Masturbation and Driving
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  1. #1
    JBN
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    Default Masturbation and Driving

    The title was just to get your attention. On the news today - Distraction Causes 50% of Fatal Accidents.
    WHEN it comes to driving, technology has raced past the law - and it's time to redress the imbalance.

    The plethora of technological distractions that now turn motor vehicles into mobile lounge rooms is a killer.
    Mobile phones, texting, tweeting, Facebook, in-car DVD players, iPods, iPads, sat-navs ... the list of distractions goes on.

    As that list has risen, so has the toll.

    New figures show distraction and inattention led to 50 per cent of the 90 fatal crashes across the state during the past financial year. Some were down to fatigue, others to our infatuation with gadgetry.

    As smartphones have become part of our lives, they've invaded our cars to the point where fellow motorists and pedestrians have to worry at least some drivers around them will be distracted.

    The number of fines issued to drivers for using mobile phones behind the wheel has more than tripled since 2005 as motorists shift their attention from the road to their ring tones.

    Road-safety authorities are well aware of the danger. The latest Motor Accident Commission road-safety campaign cleverly shows how distractions such as tweeting and texting can have disastrous consequences.

    However, it is time that legislation caught up with education.

    The invasion of phones on to our roads has gone far enough.

    The current suite of fines is a deterrent - but plainly, it is not working comprehensively. Stand on any city street corner, even for a relatively short time, and you will see a procession of drivers chatting or glancing at their phones, seemingly so confident in their driving ability that they can be looking elsewhere or be distracted while moving at speed in traffic.

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    Whether it is fines so prohibitive they finally get drivers' attention, an instant loss of licence for driving while distracted by a phone, or other such heavy-handed initiatives, the rising death toll from distractions and inattention demands action.

    Such action might also extend to the growing phenomenon of cyclists weaving through city traffic while wearing earphones that dangerously block out surrounding sound.

    Advances in technology suggest a simple solution - surely there is a device for vehicles that can neutralise phones within 1m of the steering wheel when the vehicle starts, and which passengers could override.

    Perhaps Apple could invent an app - an iTurnoff - that puts unattended phones to sleep when they're inside moving vehicles.

    Meanwhile, responsible motorists should heed the MAC's brilliantly simple slogan: "Good drivers just drive."


    Read more: http://www.news.com.au/entertainment...#ixzz27wu2e3BS

    So, if SPEED is the killer, should we text slower? Speak slower?

    John

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    VIP Sponsor 59 Floride's Avatar
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    Didn't catch me..
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBN View Post
    The title was just to get your attention. On the news today - Distraction Causes 50% of Fatal Accidents.
    WHEN it comes to driving, technology has raced past the law - and it's time to redress the imbalance.

    The plethora of technological distractions that now turn motor vehicles into mobile lounge rooms is a killer.
    Mobile phones, texting, tweeting, Facebook, in-car DVD players, iPods, iPads, sat-navs ... the list of distractions goes on.
    ded initiatives, the rising death toll from distractions and inattention demands action.
    John

    G'day,
    not much happening on the postie bike
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    Les W.


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    Contented Peugeot Driver addo's Avatar
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    I read the article, too. A fumbling, vagued-out load of rubbish IMO.

    At some point, perhaps, technology to track our eye movements while steering will be mandated. Then it really will be a crime to check out the talent on the footpath!

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    Fellow Frogger!
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    It's not only the average joe that does it it's amazing the number of police i see driving with one hand and a phone held to their ear with the other.

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    Unfortunately mobile phones are an unavoidable part of life these days even when we are driving, & despite the best of intentions to pull over when the phone rings, most phones don't answer themselves with out a Bluetooth installation or device. The urgent fumbling to get the ringing mobile phone out of the pocket & answered whilst trying to find a suitable spot to pull over is potentially the most dangerous moment & yet is the easiest to avoid with inbuilt voice activated Bluetooth. It is then up to the driver whether the conversation is continued while driving or not, even if while driving , it is far safer than with the extra distraction of a phone held to one's ear. Bluetooth devices which attach to the sun visor, sit in the shirt pocket, or clip on the ear are a mixed lot but can work well.
    For this reason I maintain that Bluetooth should be a mandatory part of every new vehicle's equipment, especially as it is of negligible cost to incorporate with car's entertainment system. Even the cheapest of cars like Kia & Hyundai have it on some of their basic models& yet it is missing on the larger big three unless you option up . Bluetooth should be part of every new car's safety package.

    Cheers, Richard

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    COL
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    Just do as I do and ignore the phone unless you have a safe place to pull over to answer the phone.

    No phone call is that important that is puts your life or the life of others at risk, if the call is important to the caller they will leave a message so that you can call them back at a safe and convenient time.

    Not only are drivers on the phone the only unsafe practice but also people smoking, drinking cans of cordial or worse hot coffee; eating sandwiches or ice-creams; or any othe activity that requires the use of your hands while you are driving.

    just my
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    dvr
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    RBT led to a significant improvement in driver responsibility regarding drink driving.

    Automatic 3 month licence suspension for using the phone would do the same.

    Whilst smoking or eating an ice cream etc can be a distraction they are largely mindless. Talking on the phone is a cognitive activity which impedes the thinking that goes with controlling a vehicle.

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    1000+ Posts Wildebeest's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by COL View Post
    Just do as I do and ignore the phone unless you have a safe place to pull over to answer the phone.

    No phone call is that important that is puts your life or the life of others at risk, if the call is important to the caller they will leave a message so that you can call them back at a safe and convenient time.

    Not only are drivers on the phone the only unsafe practice but also people smoking, drinking cans of cordial or worse hot coffee; eating sandwiches or ice-creams; or any othe activity that requires the use of your hands while you are driving.

    just my

    My sediments exactly. How important can it be? Leave a call-back message/number.
    I ignore phone calls at home if I'm watching TV. Leave a message.

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    Regarding the original topic....

    I saw a numberplate the other day - and I swear I am not making this up - reading WNK 247.

    I believe it speaks for itself.

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    Quote Originally Posted by citroenut View Post
    Unfortunately mobile phones are an unavoidable part of life these days even when we are driving, & despite the best of intentions to pull over when the phone rings, most phones don't answer themselves...
    With all due respect (which means I am about to call BS), mobiles are not an unavoidable part of life. And even if you have become a slave to your mobile, they have this magic function called messagebank.

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    Australia has an obsession with lawmaking, at the expense of nurturing commonsense and decency.

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    UFO
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter J Kent View Post
    It's not only the average joe that does it it's amazing the number of police i see driving with one hand and a phone held to their ear with the other.

    IIRC, it is legal for on duty emergency services workers to use a handheld mobile whilst driving. For what exact reason I am not sure, but speculation on that matter would take (yet another?) this thread way O/T
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    1000+ Posts jo proffi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thudd View Post
    With all due respect (which means I am about to call BS), mobiles are not an unavoidable part of life. And even if you have become a slave to your mobile, they have this magic function called messagebank.
    I agree.
    I had slater and gordon hounding me for $7k for a few weeks, and I can assure you I avoided that damn phone for about that long.

    Jo

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    1000+ Posts Kim Luck's Avatar
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    I'm looking at the plusses and minusses and trying to work out why people are distracted from their driving. Aeroplane drivers get to talk and listen constantly to involved instructions and other dialogue, at the same time monitoring situational awareness, instruments, maps and a few other tasks of varying degrees of difficulty. It's not illegal to answer a 'phone whilst driving an aeroplane and doing all these other things, I'm left wondering, what's the difference?
    Don't it always seem to go that you don't know what you've got 'til it's gone............

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    Quote Originally Posted by citroenut View Post
    Unfortunately mobile phones are an unavoidable part of life these days even when we are driving
    Easily avoidable while driving and that should be standard practice.
    Phones have message services, people can leave messages.

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    CFA firemen are allowed to talk on the radio when driving but not when travellling Code1 (lights & sirens).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kim Luck View Post
    I'm looking at the plusses and minusses and trying to work out why people are distracted from their driving. Aeroplane drivers get to talk and listen constantly to involved instructions and other dialogue, at the same time monitoring situational awareness, instruments, maps and a few other tasks of varying degrees of difficulty. It's not illegal to answer a 'phone whilst driving an aeroplane and doing all these other things, I'm left wondering, what's the difference?
    G'day,
    about 1500 ft, or thereabouts, from memory. And no idiots in four wheel drives.
    regards,
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    Quote Originally Posted by pug206gti View Post
    G'day,
    about 1500 ft, or thereabouts, from memory. And no idiots in four wheel drives.
    I think he meant taxiing. Flying and driving would be comparing 'apples with oranges'. But do they really have unrelated converstions when taxiing?
    "The enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, it's the illusion of knowledge"
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    1000+ Posts Kim Luck's Avatar
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    The closing speeds in aircraft are much higher and the separation, well, sometimes, is not that good. I'm talking about the driver/pilot workload. Pilots don't have dotted or solid lines in the sky, yet. A few knots airspeed too low and you will be practicing spin recovery. A few knots too high, and some important bits might/will fall off. Car drivers don't have to manually lean or richen their fuel mixtures or adjust their propellor pitch. They don't have to ask permission to enter certain areas at certain heights. They don't have to submit a flight plan which they must adhere to. Yet they can't avoid running into each other and killing themselves on a moderately large scale.
    When you consider that car drivers at the speed limit on a highway have a closing speed of 200 km/h and that their horizontal separation may be only a couple of feet, doesn't it suggest to anyone that the skill level of car drivers is totally inadequate? They are not tested for or required to display any skills other those required for 60 km/h suburban speeds. Absolutely and woefully inadequate! My personal view, with which some of you may agree is that the minimum requirement to obtain a drivers licence should be similar to a GA pilots licence which involves a little? "disaster recovery" training, and at a minimum should involve high speed dirt driving and skid-pan training.
    Don't it always seem to go that you don't know what you've got 'til it's gone............

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    JBN
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    I don't have any problem not using a mobile phone in the car (no friends). In fact I don't have much of a conversation with my passengers when I am driving. I am driving and concentrating very hard and they are usually speechless.

    John

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    1000+ Posts Kim Luck's Avatar
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    As they should be!
    Don't it always seem to go that you don't know what you've got 'til it's gone............

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kim Luck
    ...licence should be similar to a GA pilots licence which involves a little? "disaster recovery" training, and at a minimum should involve high speed dirt driving and skid-pan training.
    Speaking from experience, it is a LOT cheaper and safer to be instructed in these than when you try to learn by yourself...

    But - how happy would the police be, if every driver was a potential Dakar placegetter? The chases would be fearsome.

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    Quote Originally Posted by addo View Post
    Speaking from experience, it is a LOT cheaper and safer to be instructed in these than when you try to learn by yourself...

    But - how happy would the police be, if every driver was a potential Dakar placegetter? The chases would be fearsome.
    But interesting......
    Don't it always seem to go that you don't know what you've got 'til it's gone............

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    I still think Bluetooth hands free phone operation should be mandatory in all new vehicles, for despite the risks drivers WILL use mobile phones, & WILL answer them before pulling over , IF they pull over.
    For ultimate safety maybe we should ban wives, husbands, kids, dogs, radios, & swinging St Christopher medals from our cars while driving.
    Or should it be mandatory for all drivers to pass a qualified defensive driving course to get & maintain a license ?
    Drive safely, Richard

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