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  1. #26
    Fellow Frogger! Commerciale's Avatar
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    Not sure about the hours so far but the strip down started in January 2011. The shell was ready for blasting and painting in April 2011. However, the painter could not start until November. In the interim I cleaned up and repaired innumerable small bits. Being retired, I have been able to do something most days but a trip to France mid-year and the Canberra winter slowed me up a bit.

    Latest drama has been fitting the door glass and fighting the outer sealing strips. Each front door assembly has been apart more than once but I am convinced that next time will be the last. I managed to dent one of the stainless steel surrounds and hoped that it woulld still look OK - wrong. It will have to come off for the dents to be picked up and polished out. Of course this will require removal of the quarter window again.

    More photos of the wagon as requested.

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    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 203 Wagon Restoration-copy-p1010300.jpg   203 Wagon Restoration-copy-p1010305.jpg   203 Wagon Restoration-picture-037-2-.jpg  

  2. #27
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    Looks awesome. Well done, and I'm looking forward to seeing it come together.


    Renn
    Renn
    Peugeot 205 s16
    Megane RS 225 Cup

  3. #28
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    After some time I should report on the progress of this job. In short, the progress is slow and painstaking.


    After much frustration most of the glass and door fittings are in place. The front door glasses have been in and out at least three times each in an attempt to get the outer glass seals to work as intended and to be the right shape. The seals I got from Zero 4 in France are better that those available locally but are still a slightly different shape to the originals. Some of you may be aware that these are staked between the outer window trims and an inner stainless steel locating strip. The problem is getting the rubber seal located so that when secured it follows the curve of the window trim. It also needs to protrude just the right distance so that it does not curl under when the window is lowered. After much frustration I discovered that the best way is to glue the rubber to the window trim with contact cement before re-staking the locating strip. Please contact me if you need some tips about removing and replacing front windows - I'm now a past master!
    203 Wagon Restoration-p1010402.jpg

    Most of the brightwork is now in place. I polished the stainless steel myself and forked out for the chrome. The Australian bumpers look pretty plain but at least they shine. The headlight reflectors were re-silvered.

    203 Wagon Restoration-p1010399.jpg
    203 Wagon Restoration-p1010406.jpg

    The next big job was the wiring. I was dreading this but, with a couple of my usual glitches it turned out OK. I carefully measured the three loom pieces and bought 100 metres of 3mm black cotton braided wire expecting that this would more than do the job - wrong. It appears that I overlooked the fact that the main power feeds use 4 mm. While the 3mm is good for 10 amps - well within what I thought would be peak load, the regulator is rated at 14 amps. I am sure that the larger wire was there for a purpose. I now have a an excess of 3 mm wire!

    Anyway, by following the old looms and a wiring diagram I manage to make up the new looms bound with the correct linen tape. These are now indistinguishable from the old, except that the terminals are not numbered - not a problem as I now know each wire by its location (anal retention is not a bad thing in these circumstances). The one departure is the deletion of the second horn wire - unnecessary as only one horn was fitted from new. As this wire united the front part of the lighting loom I now have wiring in four rather than three parts. The next photos show the re-wired dash resting on five new Michelin Xs, the dash front and where the whole mess will go.
    203 Wagon Restoration-p1010404.jpg
    203 Wagon Restoration-p1010405.jpg203 Wagon Restoration-p1010401.jpg
    Dano likes this.

  4. #29
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    Tony did you get new 1/4 vent rubbers? if so, where did you get them?

    cheers Pete

    I am gunna get another 403 on the road........one day

  5. #30
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    Hi Pete

    I got the quarter window rubbers as a generic kit from Spectrum in Sydney. They were not cheap, do not fit as well as I would have hoped and had to be cut to suit - a very fiddly job. Ready to fit rubbers are available from France, the cheapest I have seen is 90 Euros from Comptoir-carosserie (www.comptoir-carosserie.fr ).

  6. #31
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    Thanks Tony.
    I have some from Scotts', thought they were very ordinary, would love to have some new ones for my 403 wagon, but so un-impressed with the Scotts' ones that I am going to re-use my old ones.
    cheers Pete

    I am gunna get another 403 on the road........one day

  7. #32
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    Scott's are only an agent for Spectrum - these are the same product.

    I have just about fixed all my rubber problems with the exception of rear side window seals. These are a U section with a particularly thick (6 MM) base which is ribbed on the bottom. If all else fails I can use the old ones with a liberal dose of sealer.

    Speaking of rubber, I am still looking for lower front floor mats in a better condition than those I have and a good air cleaner hose. Please see my ad in parts wanted.

  8. #33
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    Default Nearly There- Finally

    This has been some time coming. After nearly a year of work on the drivetrain the whole lot came together in August 2014. After a protracted delay at the trimmer I finally got the whole mess back in March this year. At that point I discovered that a couple of screws had penetrated the rear wiring loom, shorting out the tail and stop lights. An intervening trip to Europe meant that it was not until June that the trimmer could come over from Goulburn to pull out the new headlining.

    That matter resolved I attempted to start the engine. Having no faith in my ability I had the final assembly done by an experienced Bugatti mechanic. The input was balancing, hard valve seats, new pistons and sleeves, bearings, new timing chain and a reconditioned clutch. No start but plenty of 203 Wagon Restoration-p1010698.jpg203 Wagon Restoration-p1010484.jpg203 Wagon Restoration-p1010690.jpgcoughing back! A few days bum scratching revealed that the distributor drive had been inserted 180 degrees out. A quick rearrangement of the plug leads saw what was an expected result - instant starting and quite as a mouse. You will see the slightly strange arrangement in one of the attached photos - something I can live with for the time being. Now all I have to do is carefully bed the rings in and I will have as new performance (a relative term for a standard 203 wagon). However........

    The clutch refused to fully disengage - more bum scratching. The wagon has the early type release mechanism which operates below the bell housing. The release fork moves right to the end of its slot so that part of the process is OK. According to the factory workshop manual the forward movement of the clutch thrust is only 1.5 mm. The only part I did not replace was the thrust, thinking it looked OK. My current theory is that I was wrong and the thrust was slightly worn - not compatible with a new unworn clutch plate. There is probably only a poofteenth in it as the engine will turn freely on the starter with the handbrake engaged but the car inches forward with it off. All this means that the engine will have to come out - aaggghh!

    The Canberra winter has not been conducive to this process - the shed has ranged from zero to six degrees over the past couple of weeks. Today it is raining and snow is forecast for Sunday. My rationale is that I could risk hypothermia but running the car before spring would not be pleasant due the lack of a heater. All this represents a cop out I can claim due to age and infirmity.

    I am now able to contemplate over four year's work and the results are a little underwhelming. In seeking authenticity I probably forgot how basic the 203 utilitares were. The overall effect is rather hair shirt. Possibly the only concession to luxury is the carpet in the load area. However, this is a non-authentic touch to preserve the painted surface and is easily removed.

    All this aside I am now (puffs out chest) claiming what is probably Australia's, if not the World's, most authentically restored 203 wagon. I make this claim on the basis that even the one in the Peugeot museum has been dolled up with familiale trimmings. All claims to the contrary will be carefully considered.


    The question remains as to whether I now have an asset or a liability. Perhaps I should have spent the money on fast women and slow horses.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 203 Wagon Restoration-p1010691.jpg   203 Wagon Restoration-p1010700.jpg   203 Wagon Restoration-p1010689.jpg   203 Wagon Restoration-p1010693.jpg   203 Wagon Restoration-p1010694.jpg   203 Wagon Restoration-p1010692.jpg  

    203 Wagon Restoration-p1010699.jpg   203 Wagon Restoration-p1010695.jpg   203 Wagon Restoration-p1010696.jpg   203 Wagon Restoration-p1010701.jpg   203 Wagon Restoration-p1010703.jpg  

  9. #34
    1000+ Posts Peter Chisholm's Avatar
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    That is one beautiful looking 203. What a fantastic job.

  10. #35
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    Please allow me to be overwhelmed for you.
    I am really surprised by all the upholstery, but then mine had obviously had a hard 22 years before my custody - and the less said about that the better ...
    Could you move to FNQ?

  11. #36
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    Won't be the thrust, you can adjust the play out of this.
    More likely the pressure plate is se t up wrongly.
    Graham

    Quote Originally Posted by Commerciale View Post
    This has been some time coming. After nearly a year of work on the drivetrain the whole lot came together in August 2014. After a protracted delay at the trimmer I finally got the whole mess back in March this year. At that point I discovered that a couple of screws had penetrated the rear wiring loom, shorting out the tail and stop lights. An intervening trip to Europe meant that it was not until June that the trimmer could come over from Goulburn to pull out the new headlining.

    That matter resolved I attempted to start the engine. Having no faith in my ability I had the final assembly done by an experienced Bugatti mechanic. The input was balancing, hard valve seats, new pistons and sleeves, bearings, new timing chain and a reconditioned clutch. No start but plenty of Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	71633Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	71634Click image for larger version. 

Name:	P1010690.jpg 
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ID:	71635coughing back! A few days bum scratching revealed that the distributor drive had been inserted 180 degrees out. A quick rearrangement of the plug leads saw what was an expected result - instant starting and quite as a mouse. You will see the slightly strange arrangement in one of the attached photos - something I can live with for the time being. Now all I have to do is carefully bed the rings in and I will have as new performance (a relative term for a standard 203 wagon). However........

    The clutch refused to fully disengage - more bum scratching. The wagon has the early type release mechanism which operates below the bell housing. The release fork moves right to the end of its slot so that part of the process is OK. According to the factory workshop manual the forward movement of the clutch thrust is only 1.5 mm. The only part I did not replace was the thrust, thinking it looked OK. My current theory is that I was wrong and the thrust was slightly worn - not compatible with a new unworn clutch plate. There is probably only a poofteenth in it as the engine will turn freely on the starter with the handbrake engaged but the car inches forward with it off. All this means that the engine will have to come out - aaggghh!

    The Canberra winter has not been conducive to this process - the shed has ranged from zero to six degrees over the past couple of weeks. Today it is raining and snow is forecast for Sunday. My rationale is that I could risk hypothermia but running the car before spring would not be pleasant due the lack of a heater. All this represents a cop out I can claim due to age and infirmity.

    I am now able to contemplate over four year's work and the results are a little underwhelming. In seeking authenticity I probably forgot how basic the 203 utilitares were. The overall effect is rather hair shirt. Possibly the only concession to luxury is the carpet in the load area. However, this is a non-authentic touch to preserve the painted surface and is easily removed.

    All this aside I am now (puffs out chest) claiming what is probably Australia's, if not the World's, most authentically restored 203 wagon. I make this claim on the basis that even the one in the Peugeot museum has been dolled up with familiale trimmings. All claims to the contrary will be carefully considered.


    The question remains as to whether I now have an asset or a liability. Perhaps I should have spent the money on fast women and slow horses.

  12. #37
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    Graham, there is no adjustment left at the thrust. The nut on the rod only gives the necessary 19mm free play at the pedal by bringing the thrust back from the clutch lever ring. My initial thought was that raising the ring by adjusting the clutch levers would solve the problem. However, I am not sure if this process would cause other problems. My question is can it be done and by how much? If so I could use a surface plate and height gauge to ensure all three levers are at an equal height.

    All ideas/opinions greatly appreciated.

    Tony

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Commerciale View Post
    Graham, there is no adjustment left at the thrust. The nut on the rod only gives the necessary 19mm free play at the pedal by bringing the thrust back from the clutch lever ring. My initial thought was that raising the ring by adjusting the clutch levers would solve the problem. However, I am not sure if this process would cause other problems. My question is can it be done and by how much? If so I could use a surface plate and height gauge to ensure all three levers are at an equal height.

    All ideas/opinions greatly appreciated.

    Tony
    AFAIK Graham is referring to the adjustment of the "fingers" on the pressure plate . This adjustment is critical in fichtel and sachs style clutch because it sets the released and engaged position of the ring the carbon thrust contacts.

    No amount of actuator rod adjustment will correct for incorrectly set "fingers" on the pp.
    Mutual Respect is Contagious


  14. #39
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    Try reducing the pedal free play to 10 mm and see if there is any improvement, quick and easy to do and may be a pointer as to where to go to next.

    Quote Originally Posted by Commerciale View Post
    Graham, there is no adjustment left at the thrust. The nut on the rod only gives the necessary 19mm free play at the pedal by bringing the thrust back from the clutch lever ring. My initial thought was that raising the ring by adjusting the clutch levers would solve the problem. However, I am not sure if this process would cause other problems. My question is can it be done and by how much? If so I could use a surface plate and height gauge to ensure all three levers are at an equal height.

    All ideas/opinions greatly appreciated.

    Tony

  15. #40
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    Reducing the free play does not make any difference as the release fork still cannot go beyond the end of the slot to provide more release. I am left with three possibilities - worn thrust, clutch plate too thick or incorrectly adjusted fingers. I gave the specs to the rebuilder who provided a new driven plate and reconditioned the pressure plate. As the specs indicate a range of two mm for the plate thickness I have just about ruled that possibility out. Again, the specified total movement at the thrust is 1.5 mm. If I could bring the fingers up by an amount within that measurement the problem might be solved. Has anyone done this before?

  16. #41
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    Aah, I see what you mean now.
    You can pack these bearings out if you have a removeable carbon.
    This was done a lot in order to use the 9 spring 404 clutch plate, just a thought, you don't have a 404 clutch do you?
    The 203 one has 6 springs.




    Quote Originally Posted by Commerciale View Post
    Reducing the free play does not make any difference as the release fork still cannot go beyond the end of the slot to provide more release. I am left with three possibilities - worn thrust, clutch plate too thick or incorrectly adjusted fingers. I gave the specs to the rebuilder who provided a new driven plate and reconditioned the pressure plate. As the specs indicate a range of two mm for the plate thickness I have just about ruled that possibility out. Again, the specified total movement at the thrust is 1.5 mm. If I could bring the fingers up by an amount within that measurement the problem might be solved. Has anyone done this before?

  17. #42
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    congratulations Tony, beautifull job ,
    we wont ask how many shekles it cost will we ?
    hand claps
    colin

  18. #43
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    No little thanks to you Colin. I hope you never want the donated bits back!

  19. #44
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    No Graham. The pressure plate is the original reconditioned. Also, the carbon probably cannot be removed being is held in place by the oil funnel and possibly a roll pin.

  20. #45
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    That is one magnificent looking PUG. You should be rightly proud of what you have achieved. Well done.

    Cheers,
    .
    Dano

  21. #46
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    Almost forgot. There are two things I am still looking for. The first is a better lower driver's side rubber mat. By better I mean no tears, relatively soft and with little underfoot wear. The second is a Peugeot wooden handled Phillips head screwdriver for the tool kit. These were also supplied with the 403 so someone must have a spare.

  22. #47
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    If it is of that style then no, it cannot be removed.
    Some were clamped in place by a bolt compressing the alloy ring.
    It does look like the fingers have been set incorrectly.
    Clutches will normally disengage fine even when the carbon has been worn right out and the alloy is making contact with the thrust pad. BGT in Dandenong are experienced with setting up these clutch plates.
    Graham

    Quote Originally Posted by Commerciale View Post
    No Graham. The pressure plate is the original reconditioned. Also, the carbon probably cannot be removed being is held in place by the oil funnel and possibly a roll pin.

  23. #48
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    Oooooohhhhhh, lovely. Just seen your efforts, and I'm full of admiration.
    I am attempting a "no expense spared" resto of a 1952 Citroen Light 15 in similar condition, but sand blasting etc are not in my lexicon as I need a project to get me off my arse and out from under a small "black dog", so paint stripper, elbow grease and profanity, plus plenty of encouragement from Froggers and my "Consultant" will hopefully achieve a comparable result.

    How long have you taken??

  24. #49
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    WOW! You have every right to puff out the chest, that's just beautiful..

    You are a very lucky guy to have found such a solid example to use as a base and the car is very fortunate indeed to have been restored by someone who cared and was prepared to do 'whatever it takes' to complete what must been an enormous task.

    No one but yourself would really know what it took to achieve that result, though some of us would have a clue.

    Well done and now the real enjoyment begins. Happy motoring.


  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by exvet View Post
    Oooooohhhhhh, lovely. Just seen your efforts, and I'm full of admiration.
    I am attempting a "no expense spared" resto of a 1952 Citroen Light 15 in similar condition, but sand blasting etc are not in my lexicon as I need a project to get me off my arse and out from under a small "black dog", so paint stripper, elbow grease and profanity, plus plenty of encouragement from Froggers and my "Consultant" will hopefully achieve a comparable result.

    How long have you taken??
    The actual restoration has taken a bit over four years. However, this was preceded by a couple of years of research and parts gathering. Being retired I theoretically have 24/7 available for tasks such as this. In practice my attention span is about 3-4 hours per day and not every day.

    Whilst I admire your desire to forgo abrasive blasting I would also suggest that while risking brain death in the process the end result cannot be as good. Your time is probably better spent in pedantic tasks such as ensuring that every nut, bolt, washer and other fasteners are original and authentic. If Citroen do their parts books as well as Peugeot you have something to memorise and follow to the nth degree. Besides which there is plenty to do if you make up your own wiring loom, brake lines and small rubber bits.

    Speaking of blasting, an indispensable aid is a blasting cabinet. All those little steel bits will come up rust free with garnet and aluminium with glass beads. The cabinets themselves are not dear (get the biggest one you can afford) but a compressor of at least 14 cfm is essential, as is a dust extractor. Old vacuum cleaners bought cheaply make good sacrificial extractors. The grit eventually gets them in the motor - I have gone through two on this project.

    And remember, your best friend is Ebay France -consult daily for surprising results.

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