Xantia Octopus - Billet Replacement
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  1. #1
    Contented Peugeot Driver addo's Avatar
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    Default Xantia Octopus - Billet Replacement

    Not the whole thing.

    In the interests of maintaining a good level of personal insolvency, I've commissioned a billeted block with fittings to accommodate the main junction of return lines near the LHM reservoir (four in, one out).

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    Benefit in this, is it allows the use of "normal" rubber fuel line or fluoropolymer lined silicone tubing. No more thermoplastic hoses to break when it's not convenient.

    The cost? $350. So I have scripted Shane's reply before he can write it:

    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleChevron
    $350??? That's outrageous! Is it made of gold or something?
    Stage Two will be bespoke black silicone lines from reservoir to accumulator/pump hardlines. No ideas yet on the cost there.

  2. #2
    Sans Pond. STALLED's Avatar
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    Can you have it anodised in gold/yellow, for that special effect?
    2005 Renault Clio 182 Cup

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  3. #3
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Gerry has made a "junction" box for the power steering octopus on the CX. He silver soldered a small amount of sheet metal together and silver soldered the pipework on.

    I was going to make a junction such as you have there.... just by using "reseviour -> pump" sized pipe (maybe copper), and just drilling holes and soldering the fittings to it for all of the returns ( I think Alan S has a version of such a thing years ago on his CX).

    My reasoning for making up this sort of stuff is to save paying through the nose for proprietary piping.... But surely at your cost, the full octopus through one of the re-sellers would be less expensive (I think the CX full octopus was about $120 last time I purchased one about 3years ago). Of course your version will last forever. The factory one will only last another 15->20years

    seeya,
    Shane L.
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    '78 GS1220 pallas
    '92 Range Rover Classic ... 5spd manual.

    Yay ... No Slugomatics


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  4. #4
    Contented Peugeot Driver addo's Avatar
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    If I could buy one, Shane, it would be about $250 imported from Europe. Can you imagine the Ateco (and successor) price? They have, however, been discontinued.

    The fabricator did offer me a quantity discount; it would be more like $550 for two and then sliding decrements to a quantity wholesale rate. However, if people aren't interested in saving 1/4 the cost on a $32 tin of polish, can you imagine their reticence to spend $300?

    This gives me a tidy fix and keeps oil off the road. In answer to Joel, I may get a black coating. Not sure yet.

  5. #5
    Contented Peugeot Driver addo's Avatar
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    Here we is, in a marine grade of aluminium alloy. The hose spigots were freehand turned in the end.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Xantia Octopus - Billet Replacement-billet_block_1.jpg  

  6. #6
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleChevron View Post
    But surely at your cost, the full octopus through one of the re-sellers would be less expensive (I think the CX full octopus was about $120 last time I purchased one about 3years ago). Of course your version will last forever. The factory one will only last another 15->20years

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    I have to agree with you Shane ..BUT when you have a not so classic right now say a BX or Xantia ..every cost becomes a issue..ESPECIALLY when it comes to the labour costs or your personal time invested in a repair...

    FWIW an octopus bypass arrangement is a very viable alternative to the home mechanic who doesn't want to shell out some large dollars to have an octopus replaced in situ into a car that was never originally intended to outlive its octopus!!!

  7. #7
    1000+ Posts robmac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by addo View Post
    Here we is, in a marine grade of aluminium alloy. The hose spigots were freehand turned in the end.
    Addo,

    Comments from someone who is not an anal retentive Citroen purist nor an a mechanical purist who over engineers an object that is fundamentally a junction of LP lines.

    It's a thing of great beauty and could be black anodised. But it is a "gold plated" mousetrap IMO.

    Why not have the device from an engineering plastic? Better and faster machining, even possibly cut out on a band saw against a template and then dressed on a belt sander.

    Then drill the galleries and tap the holes and use standard brass barbs with a sealant.

    Same result, faster manufacture and cheaper. It's the production engineer emerging.

    However I build stuff for myself the same way 'tho. Because I can.

    cheers

    Rob

    Edit: You have got me thinking.

    How about a nice thick silicon rubber mold off what you have.
    Make an Epoxy box to support it.
    Then cut the silicon rubber in half down the middle.
    Take the mold off

    Put the two halves in the cast box, with a small hole to pour into
    And cast up in a liquid engineering polyester resin with finely divided mat
    The holes can be drilled later

    You can produce them very fast, very cheaply.


    T
    Last edited by robmac; 15th August 2012 at 10:23 PM.

  8. #8
    Contented Peugeot Driver addo's Avatar
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    I will happily take flak from people like you all day on these matters because you are correct. It's nice, but 100% over-engineered.

    The rapid progress to failure of so many return components in the car, has made me reasonably gun-shy of all plastics in these applications. It's also perilously close to the autobox fill plug, so reefing the pipes aside for a fluid change is yet another stress to deal with.

    As an aside, the plastic cam covers warped so badly from heat/age they started to weep. Rather than billet them up, I used RTV in the really wonky bits, together with new gaskets. So I occasionally show restraint!

  9. #9
    1000+ Posts robmac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by addo View Post
    I will happily take flak from people like you all day on these matters because you are correct. It's nice, but 100% over-engineered.

    The rapid progress to failure of so many return components in the car, has made me reasonably gun-shy of all plastics in these applications. It's also perilously close to the autobox fill plug, so reefing the pipes aside for a fluid change is yet another stress to deal with.

    As an aside, the plastic cam covers warped so badly from heat/age they started to weep. Rather than billet them up, I used RTV in the really wonky bits, together with new gaskets. So I occasionally show restraint!
    Engineering plastics are fantastic Addo, get the correct advice.

    My hearing aid battery carriers and 1mm thick and 4 mm wide and very, very, strong.

    OEM car components are built to last 10 years. If you use the right plastic cost can be no object compared to the current masterpiece!

    Read my edit about casting....

  10. #10
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by addo View Post
    Here we is, in a marine grade of aluminium alloy. The hose spigots were freehand turned in the end.
    It will be nowhere near as nice, but I look at that and think you could make one quite easily with some 20mm solid round for probably $5.00..... Drill a hole the length of it and tap the threads for the two end fittings, then the fun part. Drill down at an angle for the other hose connections (I'm sure you have a nice pedestal drill with big vices to achieve this), tap and screw in the fittings. It'll look ugly, but last the life of the car and cost basically nothing

    I can't help myself, I'm always going to take the [email protected] approach My wife would bloody shoot me if I spent $350 on my car..... Gee's I get enough flack just 'cos it needs to much petrol if I drive it

    Wouldn't you LOVE to own a milling machine so you could try to make stuff like that joiner you have there

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    'Cit' homepage:
    Citroen Workshop
    Proper cars--
    '85 Series II CX2500 GTi Turbo I
    '63 ID19 http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/showthread.php?t=90325
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas (last looked at ... about 15years ago)
    '78 GS1220 pallas
    '92 Range Rover Classic ... 5spd manual.

    Yay ... No Slugomatics


    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by addo View Post
    If I could buy one, Shane, it would be about $250 imported from Europe. Can you imagine the Ateco (and successor) price? They have, however, been discontinued.

    The fabricator did offer me a quantity discount; it would be more like $550 for two and then sliding decrements to a quantity wholesale rate. However, if people aren't interested in saving 1/4 the cost on a $32 tin of polish, can you imagine their reticence to spend $300?

    This gives me a tidy fix and keeps oil off the road. In answer to Joel, I may get a black coating. Not sure yet.
    I fear that the blue SX wagon which I purchased recently may need such a device - it leaks LHM from the right area. So far all I can say for sure is that it drips off the bottom of the gearbox....

    Cheers

    Alec

  12. #12
    1000+ Posts cruiserman's Avatar
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    And on the 11th month it arose....We have built two bx returns, both high volume and octopus using hydraulic hose and a collection of off the shelf brass joiners, tees and reducers/enlargers depending on which way you look at them. Total cost for everything (except the time and labour to make it up and remove and refit the engine) $170
    Neil
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