Xantia Tierod replacement
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  1. #1
    1000+ Posts pottsy's Avatar
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    Default Xantia Tierod replacement

    OK, I call them the tierod, I've also seen them called trackrods. I'm referring to the rod that joins the end of the steering rack to the swivel pin. It has a normal seeming tierod ball joint at the outer end and what looks like a ball and socket arrangement into the end of the rack. Length is obviously adjustable to set the toe.

    My problem appears to be that the inner end ball and socket joint has an inordinate amount of wear in it. What I thought was simply the lower suspension arm bush needing replacement was not the case.

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    Symptoms were a rattle and "self steering" with acceleration/deceleration, as well as excess wear on the outside edge of the tyre.

    Has anyone replaced one of these rack end bushes?
    Are they in fact replaceable?
    Does the rack need to come out?
    Am I fooling myself into thinking it's a job I can do myself?

    These are all questions!

    As always, all input will be welcomed, if only to put off the major decisions and hard work!

    Cheers, Pottsy
    Buvito Ergo Sum!

    The Fleet:

    2018 C3 Shine ("Oscar" Mrs P's)
    1974 D Special Manual Sedan ("Moby Dick")
    2006 C5 HDI Wagon Auto ("Mephistopheles")
    1982 2CV6 ("Gaston") On the road! (Woohoo!)
    1957 Slough 2CV ("Alphonse") Waiting in the wings
    1975 GS Pallas ("GiSelle") Also waiting in the wings
    And for Fun, 1968 Mini Deluxe ("The R & D'luxe" 1078cc, Grin Factor 100!)

  2. #2
    1000+ Posts stuartb's Avatar
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    by memory they just screw in...I think I held the rack with a pair of visegrips and with another pair unscrewed the rackend...probably replace the gaitor too (Right side only, left has to remove the ram to replace gaitor)

    ebay UK is the cheapest and easiest for parts
    http://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_tr...k+end&_sacat=0

  3. #3
    1000+ Posts pottsy's Avatar
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    Aha! And here was I expecting it not to be that simple.

    Looks like a job I can tackle then.

    Thanks, Pottsy
    Buvito Ergo Sum!

    The Fleet:

    2018 C3 Shine ("Oscar" Mrs P's)
    1974 D Special Manual Sedan ("Moby Dick")
    2006 C5 HDI Wagon Auto ("Mephistopheles")
    1982 2CV6 ("Gaston") On the road! (Woohoo!)
    1957 Slough 2CV ("Alphonse") Waiting in the wings
    1975 GS Pallas ("GiSelle") Also waiting in the wings
    And for Fun, 1968 Mini Deluxe ("The R & D'luxe" 1078cc, Grin Factor 100!)

  4. #4
    1000+ Posts stuartb's Avatar
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    get a second opinion...it was a while ago but I did the pugs as well and dont remember cursing too much or throwing spanners...full lock the opposite to what side your doing and put it on blocks to be safe...you be inside the wheel arch...haynes should have a page on it

    pics onnhere...out of car but you can see what happens
    http://www.frenchcarforum.co.uk/foru...ic.php?t=34756
    Last edited by stuartb; 7th July 2012 at 06:49 PM.

  5. #5
    Contented Peugeot Driver addo's Avatar
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    Nice straightforward job if you prep the day before with a thorough degrease of the rack and subframe. Failure to do this, will result in great blackening of the self.

    You need both sides well up in the air on stands, wheels off. Start the car and dump the suspension with a little jack pressure under a front hub until the pressure is all bled away.

    Disconnect the dogbone first.
    Next, disconnect the lower antiroll bar link connections, both sides.
    Unbolt the offside lower arm from the chassis, and swivel it aside. As you've depressurised the struts, baling wire to hold it all far forward as possible.

    Inside the car, remove the felty stuff above driver's footwell. Ensure the steering is dead ahead and remove the key. Remove the steering shaft clamp bolt and tape it across the ignition lock for surety.

    Get back under, unclip the rack heatshield including poxy sensor wires, and remove completely.

    Back outside the car (working in offside wheelarch), disconnect the hydraulic infeed pipe from the pinion valve. Plug the end. Remove the input shaft clamp bolt, and ease the input shaft up/off the pinion splines.
    Remove the return line and immediately bung it shut with a bolt and hose clamp. It'll want to siphon otherwise. If you haven't replaced this flex line, do so when reassembling.

    Working in the wheelarches, disconnect the outer rack ends from the spindles. They're usually quite responsive to a few sharp blows with a lumpy.

    Back under the car, remove the two rack mount bolts. Now tease the rack out from the offside wheelwell, noting the subframe to rack mount shims as you go.

    While the rack is out, you can clean/repair the ram dust boot, and possibly renew the ram eye bushes if deteriorated. It's also very easy to refit the correct (genuine) dust boots this way. I used rubber lube on the lip of the boots to get them started on the shafts.

    That's about all you need to do. I bought genuine inners and outers from Germany, and genuine boots. Being fussy I painted the "raw" outer joints with VHT epoxy paint in satin black. I also fully dismantled and repacked the rack with Castrol APXT grease, but it really wasn't necessary yet - the original grease was still quite good.

    No fancy tricks for reassembly, just be thorough and remember to fasten both steering shaft clamps up. I noted the rack mount bolts almost bottom out when fully tight - watch for witness marks in your rack housing and clearance a mil or two if required.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Xantia Tierod replacement-rack_before_1.jpg   Xantia Tierod replacement-bachelor_breakfast_1.jpg   Xantia Tierod replacement-reco_rack_1.jpg  

  6. #6
    1000+ Posts stuartb's Avatar
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    I did it with the rack in car.....much easier with a bit of wriggling around

  7. #7
    1000+ Posts Ken W's Avatar
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    I have not had to do Xantia trackrods but I have done a couple of BX ones. The BX has a few one way click washers to stop them undoing themselves. I had to use stillsons on the cover of the balljoint to break past these one way washers to get the old joints off. I was able to do these in the car.



    Cheers,

    Ken W

  8. #8
    1000+ Posts pottsy's Avatar
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    Default Finally Done It!

    Hmmm. First asked the question in July, it's now nearly November. I think we can say I gave this one mature and careful consideration!

    Anyway, the new tierods only arrived last week so that's partly an excuse.

    What an anticlimax.

    I jacked the beast up on the side in question (LH) and turned the rack fully to the right. Took the ball joint out and looked carefully into the inner end. Grabbed it with one hand and it unscrewed! Wasn't loose as such, just not tightened up with a wrench apparently.

    My first thought was that maybe that was the source of movement, but the rod end is definitely cactus.

    Didn't have one of those weird ratchety type spring washers in there either. I suspect that any Loctite it may have had has been dislodged by several months of rattling.

    In any case, I removed the dust cover and replaced it on the new tierod. Fitted the new tierod with the whizz bang ratchetty washer thingys (Technical term?) and nipped it up with multi-grips. Slid the dust cover up and on and secured with zip ties just to make sure it stays.

    Fitted the other end, with suitable amounts of anti-seize of course, then put it all back on the ground.

    A quick visual alignment and a test drive.

    It's like a new car! No rattles, straight tracking and no self steering. I love my Xantia all over again!

    One day, probably if I start to hear rattles, I'll fit the RH one.

    Strange thing is that on this car I've replaced the lower wishbone on the right because the bushes were chopped out, but the LH one is spot on. Now the LH tierod went, but the RH one is spot on. Maybe it's just a Citroen thing

    In any case, I'm challenging Murphy 'cause I've now got a lower LH wishbone assembly and another tierod on the shelf, just in case!

    Thanks for all the replies guys. Cheers, Pottsy
    Buvito Ergo Sum!

    The Fleet:

    2018 C3 Shine ("Oscar" Mrs P's)
    1974 D Special Manual Sedan ("Moby Dick")
    2006 C5 HDI Wagon Auto ("Mephistopheles")
    1982 2CV6 ("Gaston") On the road! (Woohoo!)
    1957 Slough 2CV ("Alphonse") Waiting in the wings
    1975 GS Pallas ("GiSelle") Also waiting in the wings
    And for Fun, 1968 Mini Deluxe ("The R & D'luxe" 1078cc, Grin Factor 100!)

  9. #9
    1000+ Posts stuartb's Avatar
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    yes one of those jobs you spend more time thinking about than it actually takes to do it

  10. #10
    1000+ Posts Bruce H's Avatar
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    Don't have any paperwork anymore for that wagon, but the dealer who sold it to me had to replace something in that area for its roadworthyif I recall correctly, but no idea which side now. I noticed one of the front tyres wore more than the other, but put it down to pre- repair condition. Glad you're still enjoying it.
    Bruce H

    Now 99 Xantia SX x2; 96 Xantia SX; 76 GS Club Estate x2; 76 GS Club; 74 GS Club; 88 VW T3 Reimo
    Before: AX Gti; BX 19TRi Estate; CX 2200 Super & Pallas; CX2400 Pallas; CX 2400ie Prestige auto; DS3 DStyle; GS Pallas; GSA Club; Xantia Image Estate; Xantia Exclusive; Xsara VTR R4; 1.4 Special Estate; Virage; R16TS

    Contact for the Australian Citroen GS GSA and Birotor Register http://australiancitroengsgsaandbiro...com/index.html

  11. #11
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    Hi pottsy,
    Of course you know to do a proper toe-in adjustment soon as well
    Cheers Jaahn

  12. #12
    1000+ Posts pottsy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaahn View Post
    Hi pottsy,
    Of course you know to do a proper toe-in adjustment soon as well
    Cheers Jaahn
    It'll get a full alignment down the track a bit, once I get organised. In the meantime however, the toe-in is within tolerance as measured by my calibrated eye.

    The accuracy of this method, while questionable, is borne out by the fact that the car steers straight and true, doesn't scrub and doesn't deviate from line under acceleration or deceleration.

    Thanks for the thought.

    Cheers, Pottsy
    Buvito Ergo Sum!

    The Fleet:

    2018 C3 Shine ("Oscar" Mrs P's)
    1974 D Special Manual Sedan ("Moby Dick")
    2006 C5 HDI Wagon Auto ("Mephistopheles")
    1982 2CV6 ("Gaston") On the road! (Woohoo!)
    1957 Slough 2CV ("Alphonse") Waiting in the wings
    1975 GS Pallas ("GiSelle") Also waiting in the wings
    And for Fun, 1968 Mini Deluxe ("The R & D'luxe" 1078cc, Grin Factor 100!)

  13. #13
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    Default Alignment !!

    Hi Pottsy,
    I would not doubt your " calibrated eye." I use mine often in the same manner

    However I will put foward the 'alignment theory' by Jaahn, for those who may wish to contemplate it. Those who do not agree may read elsewhere.

    As there is no adjustment on any settings, (probably on your car), front or rear, other than the front toe-in, spending money on a full wheel alignment is money down the drain. Better to check the condition of the suspension joints and steering joints. If there are no worn or bent bits then just do a toe-in adjustment. Whatever, the toe-in is the most important determination of tire life. That's why the other settings are now non adjustable.

    You can do the toe-in yourself on a flat level drive with a tapemeasure and a couple of marks on the tires. And abit of grovelling The fact "that the car steers straight and true, doesn't scrub and doesn't deviate from line under acceleration or deceleration" does comment on the general alignment and joint condition, but not on the toe-in !

    Jaahn

  14. #14
    1000+ Posts pottsy's Avatar
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    Can't (and won't) argue with your logic there. By referring to a full alignment, I wasn't implying that I intend to enrichen someone with a fancy machine and a barely trained apprentice to work it. I plan to do a thorough check myself using tools that I've either bought or constructed over the years of meddling in the arcane art of automotive maintenance. The problem is finding or recovering the aforementioned tools now that I've finally moved from my old location of 29 years to the new one. (I farmed out a lot of stuff to minimise the amount I needed to move)

    Somewhere, and I suspect it's currently on loan to a mate, I've got a nifty gadget which measures the difference between the front and rear of the rim, in other words toe-in (or out). I made it years ago and it's adjustable in width to range from a Mini to a 505 Wagon, the extremes I needed to address at the time. It should work fine on the Xantia, but stretches a little for the DS.

    When I find it, or recover it, I'll check Zaphod more accurately. I appreciate that accurate setting of the toe has a profound effect on the self centering and other attributes of the way a car drives.

    Tied in with that will be a check of the camber and castor with my proprietary gauge, when I can recover that from No. 1 son!

    All that being said, my statement from the previous post, and re-quoted by you, is a sort of "seat of the pants" definition of a car that has all its settings, including the toe, close to correct. On that basis, I'm happy to drive it for a while without stressing too much until I can check it all as above.

    But thanks for the feedback. Without it this forum would be boring!

    Cheers, Pottsy
    Buvito Ergo Sum!

    The Fleet:

    2018 C3 Shine ("Oscar" Mrs P's)
    1974 D Special Manual Sedan ("Moby Dick")
    2006 C5 HDI Wagon Auto ("Mephistopheles")
    1982 2CV6 ("Gaston") On the road! (Woohoo!)
    1957 Slough 2CV ("Alphonse") Waiting in the wings
    1975 GS Pallas ("GiSelle") Also waiting in the wings
    And for Fun, 1968 Mini Deluxe ("The R & D'luxe" 1078cc, Grin Factor 100!)

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