DS23IE fuel remains pressurized how long?
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  1. #1
    Thank God for my Hydroen harrisson_citroen's Avatar
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    Default DS23IE fuel remains pressurized how long?

    I need toget to the pressure regulator this weekend and need to disconnect some conduits.
    Given I haven't started the car for 2 weeks, I'm wondering for howlong the fuel stays pressurized in there?
    Anyone knows? Also any easy way to remove fuel pressure regulator?

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  2. #2
    Fellow Frogger! CorneSoutAfrica's Avatar
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    Most of the fuel pressure is gone as soon as the fuel pump is off. So you don't have to worry about that.

    To get to the fuel pressure regulator you need to remove the intake manifold, just to make the fuel pressure regulator easier to get to. That's the easy way in my experience I probably missed it but why do you want to remove the fuel pressure regulator? Do you think it is causing the hassles you have? I am just asking

    Replace the fuel pipes if you haven't yet done it, but I think you already did You know why

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  3. #3
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    If in doubt have a piece of rag around the end of the fuel hose as you prise it off.
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  4. #4
    Fellow Frogger
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    The regulator is between the injectors and the tank on the return side. This should be about 30 psi, or whatever the book shows, but it's about that. So, if the fuel system is good and there are no weak parts to leak internally, that pressure should remain in the rail after shutoff, at least initially. It would probably depend on what pump it now has as some pumps may have internal one-way vales and accumulators. If it's sat for a few weeks, then it's probably no longer pressurised.

    It's quite easy to change to a BX style Bosch pump, but you'd need to simplify the piping and remove the Y-piece.

    If any of the hoses are at all suspect, you must change them as the risk of a fire is real. If you still have original style hoses, you can remove the woven covering and slip them over new hose just to improve the appearance. Free them from the old hose with a pick and then push them back like a sock to increase the diameter and slip them off.
    Last edited by David S; 27th June 2012 at 12:40 AM.

  5. #5
    Thank God for my Hydroen harrisson_citroen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CorneSoutAfrica View Post
    Most of the fuel pressure is gone as soon as the fuel pump is off. So you don't have to worry about that.

    To get to the fuel pressure regulator you need to remove the intake manifold, just to make the fuel pressure regulator easier to get to. That's the easy way in my experience I probably missed it but why do you want to remove the fuel pressure regulator? Do you think it is causing the hassles you have? I am just asking

    Replace the fuel pipes if you haven't yet done it, but I think you already did You know why

    Cheers
    Corne

    Corne,

    I still suffer from too much fuel after about 3 or 4 minutes running. The consensus from the experts seems to be the next thing to look at is the pressure regulator. I have found one for a reasonable price ($100) and so it will go in on the weekend and I'm very hopeful. The pipes come as a tee piece don't they, so which one do you un-plug first to make it easy? and also how do you re-install?
    DS Un jour, DS toujours !

  6. #6
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrisson_citroen View Post
    Corne,

    I still suffer from too much fuel after about 3 or 4 minutes running. The consensus from the experts seems to be the next thing to look at is the pressure regulator. I have found one for a reasonable price ($100) and so it will go in on the weekend and I'm very hopeful. The pipes come as a tee piece don't they, so which one do you un-plug first to make it easy? and also how do you re-install?
    Wouldn't a fuel pressure gauge fitted in there be a sensible first step Just plug it in instead of the cold start injector.

    seeya,
    Shane L.
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  7. #7
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    The regulator is adjustable, but if it's very old it may be best to replace it. A fairly tight fit as it has three connections, all with short hoses. You could test it's setting using compressed air and the compressor's adjustable regulator.

  8. #8
    Thank God for my Hydroen harrisson_citroen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleChevron View Post
    Wouldn't a fuel pressure gauge fitted in there be a sensible first step Just plug it in instead of the cold start injector.

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    Very good option, of which I hadn't thought of unfortunately .
    However my view is that this DS is a looooong term resto project, and considering the regulator is most likely 40 years old, I am changing it anyway as a reasonable priced one has come along.
    Whenever I can afford a new bit, I throw it in there.

    So far: new paint, recon gearbox, recon steering rack, new fuel pump, new seat covers and cards, plugs etc.. oil, diff oil, lhm. I am waiting for the money to indulge in a full set of the richo-sphere spheres, but that is only once the car is mobile.
    DS Un jour, DS toujours !

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