DS Cooling fan
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Thread: DS Cooling fan

  1. #1
    mnm
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    Default DS Cooling fan

    Hi all

    I've noticed that some radiator fans on the DS have a hollow centre and others are conical, like an planes propeller. Did the design of the radiator fan change over the car's history? Size, capacity, etc?

    Cheers

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    Matthew

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    Fellow Frogger!
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    You are correct the design changed. The flatter profile with the cut off front is hollow and allows a small electric motor to be installed behind the radiator with the motor casing body sitting inside the nylon empty fan centre.

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    Now go make me a sandwich Hotrodelectric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mnm View Post
    Hi all

    I've noticed that some radiator fans on the DS have a hollow centre and others are conical, like an planes propeller. Did the design of the radiator fan change over the car's history? Size, capacity, etc?

    Cheers

    Matthew
    It mostly had to do with whether the car had A/C or not. The hollowed out fans were originally to allow space for the auxiliary electric fan motor. I'm guessing also a severe hot weather package for some markets without the optional A/C (like Australia and SoCal) as well. These fans were usually allied with the crossflow radiator and the overflow tank. I don't think the hollow-nose fans showed up until '69. I do know of one 23 (a '74, no A/C, but hollow fan and crossflow rad.) here in SoCal so equipped ex-factory.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hotrodelectric View Post
    It mostly had to do with whether the car had A/C or not. The hollowed out fans were originally to allow space for the auxiliary electric fan motor. I'm guessing also a severe hot weather package for some markets without the optional A/C (like Australia and SoCal) as well. These fans were usually allied with the crossflow radiator and the overflow tank. I don't think the hollow-nose fans showed up until '69. I do know of one 23 (a '74, no A/C, but hollow fan and crossflow rad.) here in SoCal so equipped ex-factory.
    Actually the factory had 3 different designs. The original 'bullet' noise fan and then two styles of the flattened nose with the opening. One was designed to accept the radiator mounted electric fan - the other the opening was not large enough to take the motor housing. Was not aware of this myself until I 'salvaged' one of the later fans off of a 70 DSpecial (IRRC) that had a top flow radiator and was being dismantled with the intent of putting it on a car that was getting a x-flow unit + electric fan as an upgrade.

    Steve

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    BVH Roger Wilkinson's Avatar
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    Steve, there were two different bullet nose fans. D241-1a was used with early DS19 water pumps that included the low pressure pump. DM241-1 was used with conventional water pumps; the mounting bosses protruded 0.5mm on the bearing face for some reason. I don't know to what extent one fan can be modified to fit the other mount.

    I had thought there was only one version of the open nose fan, so we have both learned something!

    Roger

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    Quote Originally Posted by Citroenfan View Post
    Actually the factory had 3 different designs. The original 'bullet' noise fan and then two styles of the flattened nose with the opening. One was designed to accept the radiator mounted electric fan - the other the opening was not large enough to take the motor housing. Was not aware of this myself until I 'salvaged' one of the later fans off of a 70 DSpecial (IRRC) that had a top flow radiator and was being dismantled with the intent of putting it on a car that was getting a x-flow unit + electric fan as an upgrade.

    Steve
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Wilkinson View Post
    Steve, there were two different bullet nose fans. D241-1a was used with early DS19 water pumps that included the low pressure pump. DM241-1 was used with conventional water pumps; the mounting bosses protruded 0.5mm on the bearing face for some reason. I don't know to what extent one fan can be modified to fit the other mount.

    I had thought there was only one version of the open nose fan, so we have both learned something!

    Roger
    I became aware of a difference in the open nose fans when replacing the fan on my D Special, my car has been fitted with the crossflow radiator and has the factory electric fan.

    I had to modify the new fan to accommodate the motor on the electric fan, interestingly the old fan had also been modified rather crudely. If there is an open nose fan with the larger hole I've never seen one (not that you would notice when fitted to a car). Would be interesting to see if there are in fact two different part numbers.







    Cheers
    Chris
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    Now go make me a sandwich Hotrodelectric's Avatar
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    Good gawd, only anoraks like us discuss this sort of minutiae.
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    Good at it too aren't they ! It makes me proud to share testosterone with such men.

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    Should I get a bumper sticker ...
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    BVH Roger Wilkinson's Avatar
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    Anorak warning.

    I have just looked in Parts Catalogues 562, 577, 598 and 648, which between them cover pretty well the period from 1966 to the end of production. (577 covers only 1970, not 1971, for which 604 is needed and my copy of 604 is in storage at the moment; I don't have a 611, which covers 1972, but it is superseded by 648.) They all say that before July 1968 the fan part number was DM241-1 (which is bullet-nosed as I said this morning) and since July 1968 it was DX241-1. This suggests to me there was only one hollow nose fan, DX241-1. This tallies with my memory of Carter Willey describing two bullet nosed fans and one hollow nosed fan on the Yahoo lists some time back.

    Roger

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    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Is it possible that GB's car has an aftermarket fan motor in there .... that requires the hole to be made bigger

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    Now go make me a sandwich Hotrodelectric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleChevron View Post
    Is it possible that GB's car has an aftermarket fan motor in there .... that requires the hole to be made bigger

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    I'm not really sure, Shane. That would take a dedicated set of measuring calipers, measurements both on and off the car, some careful study, and input from an expert dedicated to the cad plating techniques of the time in southern Paris. You know- an anorak.

    Seriously, aftermarket parts tend to be j-u-s-t close enough for everyone, not just Citroen. Chris needing to open out the fan a bit more doesn't surprise me in the least.
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreenBlood View Post
    I became aware of a difference in the open nose fans when replacing the fan on my D Special, my car has been fitted with the crossflow radiator and has the factory electric fan.

    I had to modify the new fan to accommodate the motor on the electric fan, interestingly the old fan had also been modified rather crudely. If there is an open nose fan with the larger hole I've never seen one (not that you would notice when fitted to a car). Would be interesting to see if there are in fact two different part numbers.


    Cheers
    Chris
    Hi Chris,

    Actually there are: DM 241-1 and DX241-1 (after 7/68 for A/C). However I think these only denote the 'bullet' nose and the one that accepts the electric motor. In later parts books only the DX 241-1 part number is listed.

    Steve

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