Car storage in containers
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  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Default Car storage in containers

    Was thinking about this the other day & wondered about the problems, so highjacked this comment from another thread.
    Keeping a car in a container for any extended period of time is not recommended, plenty of reasons. Containers need modifications to prove worthy long term storage for cars.
    Our place is on the market & preparations are being made for the eventual sale with 2 shipping containers being bought ( 1 for household & 1 for my "shedshit" which includes a '48 Daimler db18 basically complete & a '30 C6F in bits). What do I then do with the B15 as we are hoping to travel for a while & I don't have access to any other storage, do I buy another container( is this getting out of hand??) to put the B15 in & what mods would I need to do to stop the potential rust from heat & humidity, apart from at least 1 "whirlybird" vent.
    cheers Dave


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  2. #2
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    I always assumed the issue was the walls, roof and floor would get covered in water whenever it drops below the dew point. How would you stop this though

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  3. #3
    bob
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    G'day,

    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleChevron View Post
    I always assumed the issue was the walls, roof and floor would get covered in water whenever it drops below the dew point. How would you stop this though

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    Maybe use insulted variety ?

    Apart from all that, we used a couple of containers at the factory, off site, for storage for a few years. I went there many times, fair weather & foul, but never noticed it raining inside. Our boxes were buried under others at times, but not always, and were used to store cartons of books that didn't seem to mind the conditions.

    They usually have a plywood floor, dunno if this makes any difference.

    cheers,
    Bob

    ps: this crowd also converted containers for use as garages......

  4. #4
    Sans Pond. STALLED's Avatar
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    What about the heat?

    How hot would the internal space of a container get, if left in broad daylight? Wouldn't want to cook a car...
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  5. #5
    Fellow Frogger
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    Whether you get 'rain' will depend on how much material is inside it to absorb the moisture. If you have cardboard, carpet etc., then I think you would have a lot less problems than in just a bare structure. Obviously, you want to minimise the humidity though, so closet camels or damp rid type desiccants would work.

  6. #6
    1000+ Posts Gamma's Avatar
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    I have some experience with container storage of a wide range of bits and bobs, (42 containers onsite at last count).

    No, it is not a good idea to store things in an "open" condition, in a shipping container, for extended periods of time.
    The floors rot out, there is a daily "dew and thaw" cycle inside the container and the fungus that can grow in there, defies the strongest of noses.

    If it is your only choice then you must,
    -have forced ventilation to keep the humidity and heat down.
    -seal all components in a dry state.
    -have a skillion roof to keep the direct heat off the container.

    The inside of the container can easily get to 100% humidity and well over 55 degrees C.
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  7. #7
    Fellow Frogger!
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    The inside of the container can easily get to 100% humidity and well over 55 degrees C.

    of the 2 containers I have, 1 is painted blue & stays reasonable cool, the other is red oxide, this gets unbelievably hot & the paint inside is seriously peeling off( i wonder how toxic it is, bet it's not water based)
    Gamma, can you please explain a little more about your comments ( I'm not sure I follow you)
    store things in an "open" condition
    have forced ventilation to keep the humidity and heat down.( extracter fans/blowers?)
    seal all components in a dry state. ( just not wet when they go into the container)

    David S, damp rid type desiccants would work. Couple of trays of kitty litter perhaps??
    thanks everyone, dave

  8. #8
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    my father has had farm stuff stored in a container in the open for the last 15 years, including never used saddlery, horse coats and other things which could be affected by moisture. all with no ill effects. and that is well inland where it gets pharking hot during summer.

    my feeling is that if there is nothing wet inside, how can there be any condensation? agreed it would get pretty hot inside, but i reckon dust, mice, moisture, etc are far more of a problem, and that is for cars stored in a shed.

  9. #9
    1000+ Posts FIVEDOOR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alexander View Post
    my feeling is that if there is nothing wet inside, how can there be any condensation? agreed it would get pretty hot inside, but i reckon dust, mice, moisture, etc are far more of a problem, and that is for cars stored in a shed.
    Humidity, but lot of that depends on where you are. Tropics would be very different from dry inland. I have heard of valuable metal material rusting into junk in Far North Queensland in shipping containers in about two years.

    Here is simple explanation under interior condensation, including steps one can take to reduce same:-

    http://www.gorell.com/pages/condensation.htm

    Condensation related and resultant mould are a huge problem in cold climates unless homes are properly designed with combination of insulation and air flow for venting.

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