Rattus Rattus and Rust Preventative
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  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger! Inspector Clouseau's Avatar
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    Default Rattus Rattus and Rust Preventative

    In another thread I raised the issue of best rust preventative. I was considering fish oil or lanolin but ArchRival has suggested Tectyl. I've done a little follow up research and it sounds promising.

    One of the issues with cars on North Coast NSW - and elsewhere - is the wretched rattus rattus and other rodents; they can wreak untold damage and have done so in a beautiful old 403 and a tractor. For the last 20 years I've had my lights on in the shed every night to partially deter these nocturnal vandals and it remains a constant battle (not too happy about my contribution to global warming either, not to mention electricity bills). I suspect that both fish oil and lanolin will draw in critters far and wide, so something inorganic like Tectyl makes a lot of sense.

    Are there any other worthwhile non-delicious products froggers might care to recommend?

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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by inspector clouseau View Post
    in another thread i raised the issue of best rust preventative. I was considering fish oil or lanolin but archrival has suggested tectyl. I've done a little follow up research and it sounds promising.

    One of the issues with cars on north coast nsw - and elsewhere - is the wretched rattus rattus And other rodents; they can wreak untold damage and have done so in a beautiful old 403 and a tractor. For the last 20 years i've had my lights on in the shed every night to partially deter these nocturnal vandals and it remains a constant battle (not too happy about my contribution to global warming either, not to mention electricity bills). I suspect that both fish oil and lanolin will draw in critters far and wide, so something inorganic like tectyl makes a lot of sense.

    Are there any other worthwhile non-delicious products froggers might care to recommend?

    Thanks
    rat bait

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    1000+ Posts forumnoreason's Avatar
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    I had my D stored in a shed up at Gloucester and rodents got in and harvested the heat/noise bonnet material around to make nests. Just found a huge wad stuffed up one of the remaining heater air hoses on the fender I took off 5 years later the other day! Location location...Little buggers.

    It might be worth testing out those rodent deterring hight frequency emitters which are supposed to agitate vermin but not your pets. Wall plug in jobs from Bunnings. In conjunction with a timer. Might work?

  4. #4
    Fellow Frogger
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    A Carcoon perhaps?
    Also, old shipping containers are fairly inexpensive if you have the room.
    Rats do a lot of damage to more recent cars too, especially to wiring looms.

  5. #5
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    Default rats

    Some weeks ago on talk back radio they were discussing the same issue regarding problems with storage of cars and RATS, the advice given was to place MOTH BALLS around the car hang them in the engine area and inside the car, but NOT on seats or carpet, apparently Rats do not like the smell and stay away, as for the cost of moth balls it may be of some help.

    Tony

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    UFO
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    It's finding big enough moths is the problem.
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    Quote Originally Posted by UFO View Post
    It's finding big enough moths is the problem.
    I'm pleased to hear it Craig, I've always experienced difficulty sexing moths.

    What's your secret?


    To answer the thread question.

    Tectyl MIGHT be enjoyed by rodents, definitely lanolin and the like will be.
    Tectyl worth a try and it smells good too.

    Keeping a car in a container for any extended period of time is not recommended, plenty of reasons. Containers need modifications to prove worthy long term storage for cars.
    Last edited by richo; 9th April 2012 at 09:46 PM.

  8. #8
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  9. #9
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    And here I was thinking Gecko poo on my ID was an issue! They don't ever do that to the GS. Maybe they like the smell of brake fluid?
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    Quote Originally Posted by pug206gti View Post
    G'day,
    python

    I love pythons, made our stay in Byron Bay last easter when a very lage specimen draped herself across our balcony.

    BUT, they will not have much of an impact on the rat population. Being cold blooded they might only need one or two a week when its warm and a lot less when its cold. From memory the carpet pythons don't hybernate. During rodent plagues it is not uncommon for sleeping pythons to be gnawed on by rats and mice.

    What you need is a mammal or a largish raptor, a critter that needs a rat a day to meet its energy requirements. This can have an enormous impact on controling rodent populations because they can prevent populations going into that phase of expodential growth.

    Hunting responses are so hardwired into some species (cats and terriers) that they will hunt when they aren't hungry. (Some people believe that the reason our ancestors gave up the nomadic way of life was because they'd found ways to store their food so that rats and mice - who thrived when humans decided to live in one place - were kept check. Cats played a big role in that.

    With pest contol what you need to do is to break the breeding cycle. Rats are a hard one. They are seriously smart and risk averse. They are also good social learners, i.e., they can learn from the experiences of other rats. Simply laying rat baits may get one or two but there's noting like a dying rat to alert others that any novel food sources are bad news. The savvy rats are then harder to kill or trap. Rats are also capable of sampling novel food sources in such a way as to determine sub leathal doses.

    As much damage as they do to wiring looms the amount of "food" the looms represent is trivial. The reason there are rats where you are is because there is food, refuge and water. Have a look at the places they might live, their food sources and water. If you've got compost bins, horses and chickens you will likely have rats. If you are going to use biological controls think about creating environments that least suit rats and best suit their predators.

    If you want to employ a cat be aware that only about 40 odd percent (don't quote me on that) of cats bred for domesticity have lost the instinct to hunt. Cats typically learn to hunt from their mums, if they're removed early, and many are, they migh not develop that skill. Many breeders deliberately raise cats as non-hunters so that they have less of an impact on the local fauna.

    You need a ratbag of a cat, raised on a farm and scrawny and mean that will exchange a decapitated rat for a catty treat.


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  11. #11
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    If moth balls are too hard to grasp then get some napthalene which rats and mice hate. I hear it is getting hard to find because of its toxicity.

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    JBN
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    Tectyl was popular with the Endrust treatments. Its a Valvoline product I think. Dries to a dark brown colour. I have heard that because it does dry and form a scab, if moisture does get under the treatment, the rusting process is accelerated.

    It didn't seem to gain much favour in the UK because of that. They preferred waxol which is a wax treatment that doesn't dry and becomes more viscous in the warmer summer months.

    In your case, I suggest fishoil for rust mixed with python pee, which should keep the rodents away.

    John

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    Fellow Frogger! ARCHRIVAL's Avatar
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    Funny you talk about cats as we just arrived home from citin and low and behold to greet us in in the bedroom 2 dead rats curtisy of our moggy more than likely in thanks for $400 worth of vet attention just before we went away After she was molested by one of the neighbourhood toms maybe cat balls rather than moth balls although the napthaliine does work on the farm
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    Quote Originally Posted by ARCHRIVAL View Post
    Funny you talk about cats as we just arrived home from citin and low and behold to greet us in in the bedroom 2 dead rats curtisy of our moggy ...

    Aww, she loves you.
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  15. #15
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    Re the rust proofing.
    Years ago Cessna wings were not internally corrosion proofed unless requested at construction. mobil made a sprayable product called "aero protector' that would spray into cavities and then congeal to a waxy coating just like Tectyl. thinned with a little ATF Dexron it would creep into all seams and make a dusty and drippy mess but it would eventually dry and create a skin. As the D is already probably well rustproofed around the oily bits ( from LHM leaks ) you could just help the process along with a mineral oil spray with the red oil into the box section cavities....that should keep the rodents away too.

  16. #16
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fritzelhund View Post
    Re the rust proofing.
    Years ago Cessna wings were not internally corrosion proofed unless requested at construction. mobil made a sprayable product called "aero protector' that would spray into cavities and then congeal to a waxy coating just like Tectyl. thinned with a little ATF Dexron it would creep into all seams and make a dusty and drippy mess but it would eventually dry and create a skin. As the D is already probably well rustproofed around the oily bits ( from LHM leaks ) you could just help the process along with a mineral oil spray with the red oil into the box section cavities....that should keep the rodents away too.
    My father has the engine out of his DS23ie at the moment. from the engine forward most of the black paint has gone and there is plenty of surface rust. From the engine back, once all the filth was cleaned off was perfect black paint and no rust If your DS has factory A/C I recommend checking the copper line between the two condensers, it runs across the chassis crossmember at the front. Due to the fact this line will be covered with condensation whenever the A/C is being used, there is series of fine rust holes across the crossmember where-ever the copper pipe touches. If you have A/C this pipes needs to be lifted slightly and supported up so it doesn't hold moisture against the cross member constantly.

    You have 5litres of LHM sitting doing nothing whenever you change the fluid right .... Your car already stinks like LHM so you might as well spray that into all the box sections. If you look under my CX it seems to have wicked up into every body seam and floor .......................... due to lhm leaks under the bonnet blowing back (no I didn't do the rust proofing myself ... unless you consider my "relaxed" approach to fixing LHM leaks .... applying rust proofing ).

    Even the old ID19 is already showing signs of "rust proofing" where-ever LHM has leaked (mostly the front drivers side jacking points, floor and sill area) .... I must replace that brake valve boot at some point


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  17. #17
    Fellow Frogger! Inspector Clouseau's Avatar
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    OK. Thanks for all the advice - much to consider. We do have pythons and every other nasty snake known to man so the rats are not as bad as they would otherwise be. I don't fancy mixing python pee but I have had it on my hand from a "leaking" roof once so I know what it smells like. When I was cleaning the shed up the other day I disturbed a goanna who had set up residence. I gingerly pushed the sheet of ply he was behind back into place and returned some time later - he had gone. Some years ago I ran into the local snake catcher who was telling me he had just caught his one thousandth brown snake - seriously. When I told him about a goanna - lace monitor - living on my roof he responded with "Goannas, don't talk to me about them. I'm not going near any goanna"!!. That's when the penny dropped about how dangerous they can be. And there I was a week before on my roof prodding the goanna with a wire to get off.

    One of the issues with the DS is that it's so damn low to the ground in the shed. Is it feasible, e.g. will it do any damage, to park the front up on ramps? It'll make rodent access that bit more difficult.

    BTW I always leave the bonnets up, as well as lights on, in the shed to discourage visitors and it seems to help.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Inspector Clouseau View Post
    OK.
    One of the issues with the DS is that it's so damn low to the ground in the shed. Is it feasible, e.g. will it do any damage, to park the front up on ramps? It'll make rodent access that bit more difficult.

    BTW I always leave the bonnets up, as well as lights on, in the shed to discourage visitors and it seems to help.
    Ahhh, I think the rats will already know how to climb the ramps anyway.Hmm.
    They'll think it's a playground, created just for them.

    Trapping is probably the most effective, other than a captive cat.

  19. #19
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    Default Anti-rust treatment

    I have never foung Tectyl forming a scab thereby allowing moisture to enter beneath it. My test subjects were R12 Virage and 16TS.I would however suggest that follow up treatment every 30 years is advisable as it seems to "dry"/"thin" out over time. On that basis I will not need to reapply to any of my current projects, being 63 + years young. Beats the hell out of doing nothing and it smells nice 'n waxy too!

    I have just slathered Tectyl in 4 repaired doors on a 16TS that I am restoring and I am extremely confident that I could live beside the sea over a good number of years without the tin worm appearing.

    The only equivalent product that I have used is the Wurth product that is a lovely bright yellow. You certainly can see where you haven't applied it.
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