seals for engine sleeves Citroen CX
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  1. #1
    Tadpole
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    Default seals for engine sleeves Citroen CX

    Does anyone have a sure idea about installation of the paper seals at the base of cylinder liners in a CX 2400 engine? My Haynes manual directs application of a sealant to the paper seal after it has been placed on the liner but this is not consistent with use of the same technology on engines in the D Series Citroens. On the D Series engines the paper seal alone provides an effective and durable seal.

    The need for removal of all remnants of previous gaskets is well understood.

    Tbe benefit of advice would be very much appreciated!

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  2. #2
    VIP Sponsor richo's Avatar
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    Is the gasket actually paper?
    The D series late DX4 and DX5 ( DS23 2347cc) engines have a plastic gasket called curtylene, looks very much like paper but does not tear.
    Neither require a sealant. If you were to use a sealant, Loctite Master Gasket 515 won't adversely affect the gasket or surfaces.
    Hope this helps.

  3. #3
    Tadpole
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    Thank you very much Richo. No, I haven't seen the seals for the CX 2400 engine and was not aware they are made from a plastic material. The ones I used on a 1985CC D Super engine appeared to be paper. I have taken careful note of your advice. RGC

  4. #4
    1000+ Posts gerrypro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ross Coldrey View Post
    Thank you very much Richo. No, I haven't seen the seals for the CX 2400 engine and was not aware they are made from a plastic material. The ones I used on a 1985CC D Super engine appeared to be paper. I have taken careful note of your advice. RGC
    I have recently replaced the barrels and pistons in my CX2400. The barrel seal flange was equipped with a metal seal that I did not trust so I used a High temperature silicon sealant ( the orange one ) to supplement the seal. I could not find any reference to a paper seal in the spares catalogue. I hope my solution works!!!!
    Cheers Gerry

  5. #5
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Hi Gerry,

    my father did my old CX over 20years ago.... I'm sure we used paper liners, there should be a selection so you can get the liner protrusion correct

    I've never needed to lift the head from a CX engine..... You just can't kill the bloody things

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    Shane L.
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  6. #6
    1000+ Posts gerrypro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleChevron View Post
    Hi Gerry,

    my father did my old CX over 20years ago.... I'm sure we used paper liners, there should be a selection so you can get the liner protrusion correct

    I've never needed to lift the head from a CX engine..... You just can't kill the bloody things

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    Paper seals ( curtylene? ) are certainly used in the D engines. I rebuilt one whilst working for Guy Navaud. But the CX engine has a thin metal shim that is crimped so that it can slightly compress. The barrel heights are machined to much closer tolerances than back in the long stroke days of the TA. These definitely needed careful barrel height adjustment. However when the D barrels became available the better accuracy meant that when fitting into a TA engine the barrels automatically came in correctly with just the paper shim. Much more convenient as it obviated the curse of settling barrels that all TAs suffered from over their life time. The Short stroke D engines and subsequently the CX engines do not need barrel height adjustment unless some one has re machined the deck or the barrel seatings in the block.
    And believe me you can kill a CX engine simply by neglecting to correctly bleed the cylinder head of air whilst refilling the radiator. This happened to my engine. The damage was inflicted by the previous owner. He drove the thing until the head cooked so badly that it had to have all gasket faces remachined to reclaim the head. The barrel damage was severe scoring on number three-------- just a whisker away from total seisure.
    Cheers Gerry

  7. #7
    VIP Sponsor richo's Avatar
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    Gerry, as I mentioned in my initial reply, Ds have both paper and the "23" engines have curtylene,which is a plastic.

    Fitting new sleeves to a short or long stroke D engine requires measuring (of cylinder protrusion) to ensure the correct crush.
    This is due to different manufacturing tolerances and variations in gasket thickness from aftermarket suppliers. I have checked a varietyof gaskets and the thickness variies.
    The only gaskets I have seen which are the same are the curtylene plastic gaskets.

    Genuine, original parts are rarely available.

    In the past two years I have rebuilt both a long stroke and a 2175 short stroke engine.
    Last edited by richo; 23rd March 2012 at 07:49 PM. Reason: clarity and brevity

  8. #8
    Tadpole
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    Gerry, thank you very much for your advice. I am most grateful for it. This is the one part of assembling these engines that I fearful of. RGC

  9. #9
    1000+ Posts gerrypro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by richo View Post
    Gerry, as I mentioned in my initial reply, Ds have both paper and the "23" engines have curtylene,which is a plastic.

    Fitting new sleeves to a short or long stroke D engine requires measuring (of cylinder protrusion) to ensure the correct crush.
    This is due to different manufacturing tolerances and variations in gasket thickness from aftermarket suppliers. I have checked a varietyof gaskets and the thickness variies.
    The only gaskets I have seen which are the same are the curtylene plastic gaskets.

    Genuine, original parts are rarely available.

    In the past two years I have rebuilt both a long stroke and a 2175 short stroke engine.
    I agree Richo. It would be foolish not to measure the protusion. In my experience it nearly always comes within tolerance on the more modern motors and I have never had to make adjustments. It is completely different in the case of using the original barrels from a TA motor. These mounted on 'Hugo Reintz " joints which were a mixture of carbon impregnated gasket material and copper shims. These involved a lot of messing about to get the protrusion to the maximum allowable tolerance. It was also necessary to check bore concentricity of the barrel with the head fitted and torqued to its correct value. This was necessary as the barrels always settled over the life of the motor and would eventually drop below the deck height if not given the maximum allowable protrusion. Then the head gasket would blow at the lowest point. This was usually accompanied by a plume of white out of the exhaust and a sump full of water. The spare parts department even sold figure 8 copper shims to place on the tops of the barrels to restore the barrel height before the new head gasket was fitted. "Talk about a Heath Robinson lash up" Thankfully when the D type long stroke barrels came along the more accurate manufacture removed this problem. The barrels would then settle in at just about the correct height with very little need for adjustment. As you may guess I have bult a number of these TA motors over the years.
    Cheers Gerry

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