Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper
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  1. #1
    Member DSuper's Avatar
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    Default Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper












    You can see, as mentioned in the title I have restored the nuts and bolts on my car. Unfortunately funds ran out so I will have to save for a wee while to do the rest!

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    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-p1060111a.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-p1060112a.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-p1060113a.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-p1060114a.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-p1060116a.jpg  

  2. #2
    VIP Sponsor richo's Avatar
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    At least you have a D Super, they're rare here in Australia.
    Keep on saving.

  3. #3
    Member DSuper's Avatar
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    OK - maybe I'm not funny! I have actually done more than the nuts and bolts...

    I'll stick up a series of photos documenting what I have done so far.

    Firstly a reminder of what I have posted about so far

    The car was lightly crashed into from behind. One thing led to another and I had the car stripped except for engine, hydraulics, clutch pedal, remnants of the brake pedal, steering wheel, most of the wiring. ie. the car could be driven at idle speed with a temporary fuel tank, but was otherwise stripped bare.

    I stripped all paint, underseal etc by hand, from the front bulkhead back and from the sills up, and applied rust gobbler to keep rust away (as advised by a professional) ; 1st mistake - do not apply rust converter to non rusty metal.

    I painted the chassis frame with high build primer (as advised through professional panelbeater by paint supplier) 2nd mistake - high build is porus, it should have had an intermediate primer under it (I later looked up the specifications online myself), and it is not necessary (for its ability to be smoothed) as these areas are unseen.

    The best method is to have the metal abrasive blasted and coated as soon as possible (within hours) with 2 pack epoxy urethane primer.

    So I decided to take it to the professionals... 3rd mistake!!
    Last edited by DSuper; 11th February 2012 at 09:52 PM.

  4. #4
    VIP Sponsor richo's Avatar
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    Oh bummer, poor advice can cost big time on a restoration.
    Please, post some good news, I hope some good fortune comes your way.
    I do briefly recall some previous posts.
    Good luck with the recovery.

  5. #5
    Member DSuper's Avatar
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    No photos of the accident damage!! Der!


    The stripping begins.



    rust hole in the bootside gutter. And a little rust at the bottom of the rear edge of the C pillar - where the glass fits in. And the front edge of C pillar will need rectification.







    The outer 1cm of the roof rail rusted out.







    Paint dissappeared off many surfaces around the back - mainly surface rust - it looks worse in the photos!!







    Ragged edge of 'elephants ear'





    Bumper mount disintergrated. (look in the hole)





    Triangle drilled off ready for replacement by the panelbeater - only treated behind with rust gobbler - wish I knew about weld through primer? at the time - That would have been the best think to do, ay?




    Again the outer 1 cm of roof rail rusted.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-037.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-038.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-044.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-050.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-051.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-053.jpg  

    Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-054.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-060.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-066.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-067.jpg  
    Last edited by DSuper; 11th February 2012 at 09:54 PM.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by richo View Post
    Oh bummer, poor advice can cost big time on a restoration.
    Please, post some good news, I hope some good fortune comes your way.
    I do briefly recall some previous posts.
    Good luck with the recovery.

    Excellent advice from Darrin, Citroen Classics - in line with what resident 'know-all' Shane says. Best to abrasive blast (for efficiency, speed and "key" for the paint, then 2 pack epoxy). Sadly prior to that I had a lot of bad advice.

    I was at the paint shop ready to spend $1000 - $1500 on paint and gear (primer, paint, guns, air fed respirator) and they (the paint shop) recommended a panel beater and painters "Who would do a good job for not much more than that" (~$1500 - $2000)...

    Sadly not a lot of good fortune since - I'll try not to have a moan-fest but there are some lessons to be passed on! Someones word, and a handshake sounds very honourable, but it does not work!!
    Last edited by DSuper; 12th February 2012 at 08:50 AM. Reason: spelling

  7. #7
    VIP Sponsor richo's Avatar
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    Weld through primer is great stuff.
    Don't know what is available in NZ, over here the best is Wurth, with a price to match.

    I've used Rust converter with success, but only on surfaces which are rusted and must admit to completely remoiving the converted surface material to new metal in favour of etch primer, then a sealer.

    The roof rail outer looks nasty, I believe now you can purchase prefabricated replacement pieces from suppliers in Europe. You'd need to check that out.

    It's good to see you're prepared to address the hard work,rather than attempt a cover-up.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by richo View Post
    Weld through primer is great stuff.
    Don't know what is available in NZ, over here the best is Wurth, with a price to match.

    I've used Rust converter with success, but only on surfaces which are rusted and must admit to completely remoiving the converted surface material to new metal in favour of etch primer, then a sealer.

    The roof rail outer looks nasty, I believe now you can purchase prefabricated replacement peices from suppliers in Europe. You'd need to check that out.

    It's good to see you're prepared to address the hard work,rather than attempt a cover-up.
    This is actually a bit of a retrospective. The car is back on the road... but may have to be largly stripped again due to cowboy workmanship (of painters, Not of panelbeaters where the car is pictured!). Just thought I should document it as I have found others progress interesting, informative, inspiring

    Re the roof rail. I wanted to use those prefab peices from europe, but the panelbeater wanted to cut through the A, B and C pillars half way down and replace with the top from a (1960s) wrecked car - not the best option in my belief, because everything below it was solid - a compromise was to cut through the A pillar with a large step in the cut for strength, drilled off at the top of the B pillar and C pillar (replaced with parts off the wreck). The back end had dropped a little and it was attached at the C pillar before the length was checked, the roof frame now 4-5mm too long and the fibre glass roof now almost? contacts the metal frame at the rear of the roof - all bolts at the back of their adjustment. Grr. Can just slide a peice of paper through so it should not rub on the paint.
    Last edited by DSuper; 11th February 2012 at 10:42 PM. Reason: clarification.

  9. #9
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    Default Roof rail process

    As mentioned I don't think this was the best way, but its how it did happen!

    I was doing all the donkey work, dismantling, drilling out spot welds, a little cutting out and shaping bits of metal, grinding welds, stipping paint.

    The panelbeater was the expert, welding and fabricating (not that a lot of fabricating was required, the car was generally solid)




    My fibreglass roof, the frame cut off the wreck.





    Starting to drill out welds at top of the B pillar





    drilling off at B pillar







    Drilling off at C pillar, and the C pillar will need some attention.









    Separating the problem metal from good metal.





    Preparing to cut through A pillar??!!






    Roof frame removed, cut through A pillar but left U section inside intact for plenty of overlap/strength.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-064.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-067.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-068.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-077.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-078.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-079.jpg  

    Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-081.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-099.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-102.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-118.jpg  
    Last edited by DSuper; 11th February 2012 at 09:41 PM. Reason: adding captions

  10. #10
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    Default New roof rail on



    New roof rail fitted





    Back - "New" parts are grey (primed). Old is black (rust convertor)



    I kept just stripping a little bit more and a little bit more and find myself at this point (the clutch slips when you floor the accelerator on a hill... I should remove the engine, fix the clutch, strip the engine bay and paint that too) I'm already out of my depth and out of my budget - At this stage I feel like my head will explode.

    Lesson 842: Don't start a restoration on the back of and minor road accident. Lesson 843: know when to stop. Lesson 844: Only do this if you've got the money!! Lesson 845: Have your own shed space - at a panelbeaters you are forced to keep on going hanging on for dear life. Though, he was kind for letting me do much of work myself in his premises.



    Ready for paint (1st attempt!)
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-219.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-223.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-419.jpg  
    Last edited by DSuper; 11th February 2012 at 10:21 PM.

  11. #11
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    Jumping back to some of the other repairs.




    LH elephants ear and bumper mounts removed by drilling out spot welds - prefabricated replacements used.





    Metal strips (that hang onto plastic sealing strips) around boot seal rusted. The one on the edge of the boot lip has been removed and the replacement will be glued on. The ones on the left and right are not yet removed (in this photo) and will be welded on.

    I retained the old boot seal (& will replace this with a new old type seal) but think that I should have modified it by using a suitable rubber mounted around the boot apeture.

    Like so: Booting the Seal





    More rust - not pretty but not too terrible either. Similar on both sides.





    Rusty around the boot, rusted bumper mount.





    Inside view - unstitching C pillar. Seen from the outside in a previous post.





    See above and below. leading edge of door jamb/c pillar looked nasty but cleand up well enough that it did not require welding. A hole in the tab that hangs onto the rubber and the bottom - no worries - it will still do its job.









    RH edge of boot floor rusted through - would have been easier to weld a patch in situ but fussy bugger here removes the floor, the has the edge of the floor repaired and the bottom of the side of the boot repaired (i think you can just see the holes in this photo) and then had them plug welded back together again.





    Spot the hole should not be there.





    All this pitted stuff is so hard to clean up with wire wheels, rotory wire brushes, stripping pads etc. It took me hours and hours. It was later restripped again in what would have been minutes or seconds by a sandblaster.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-072.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-074.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-075.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-084.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-100.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-103.jpg  

    Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-109.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-224.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-227.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-234.jpg  
    Last edited by DSuper; 12th February 2012 at 10:15 AM.

  12. #12
    Fellow Frogger! rmac's Avatar
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    What a well documented process. You are surely doing a great job on the car. Makes me wonder what lurks beneath the surface of my cars!
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by rmac View Post
    What a well documented process. You are surely doing a great job on the car. Makes me wonder what lurks beneath the surface of my cars!


    This car was described as a "remarkably rust free" too, I was not surprised by anything - plenty of little niggly bits though.



    We filled this hole and then cut a drain hole just below it.





    Another little hole that was not meant to be there. Beside the white arrow it says "local dealers signature rust proofing holes" I think this is correct? They go down the length of the sills. "Max McKay sold this car" http://www.pukeariki.com/Research/Ta...rank-max-mckay






    Another repair required.





    Fuel tank space - rust free. Yay!





    Paint time.





    "Looks great" - Sadly was not.





    New elephants ear this side.





    Pretty swish.





    Repair just inside red line. Pitting visible below sphere boss / indentation for sphere.





    Repair visible beside bonnet hinge. I think I was expecting too much - I thought it would be less visible - welding seems a tricky, messy process.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-229.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-230.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-231.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-243.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-418.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-422.jpg  

    Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-423.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-424.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-426.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-425.jpg  
    Last edited by DSuper; 12th February 2012 at 01:10 PM.

  14. #14
    Administrator GreenBlood's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DSuper View Post

    Repair visible beside bonnet hinge. I think I was expecting too much - I thought it would be less visible - welding seems a tricky, messy process.
    Really enjoying your progress here Ben, and appreciate that your car is already back on the road so we are seeing the effort and your attention to detail before the end result.

    You are fortunate to have found someone you can work with, and, who is willing to have you work alongside, a rare arrangement for sure. I'm very much looking forward to your updates with the highs and lows associated with such endeavour - we as observers learn as much, if not more from the trials and tribulations - all valuable experience and certainly illustrates that such projects are not for the faint hearted.

    Cheers
    Chris
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    Fellow Frogger! Bruce Llewellyn's Avatar
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    Default Nutz to you too!

    Hi there,

    All that I've seen here as far as the car goes looks very familiar. I've done the same header rail transplant from a '70 D super with no floors to a D Special... The rest of the special wasn't so bad and it is currently in bits. The engine was rebuilt some years back with new 2175 cc pistons & liners, re-ground crank, cam etc... about $2k worth of bits.

    Another $1k worth of bits was acquired recently, suspension boots and rebuilt / regassed spheres, paint, hydralic return hoses, DS boots etc.

    I didn't bother painting the body panels at the time but that will happen soon. I did paint the caisson, but with acrylic, not two pack and it needs some more attention now.

    Sacrelige is being committed in the form of integrated air conditioning using a variety of bits, DS condensors (but with new higher power fans) a Delphi compressor, aftermarket evaporator and the blower unit from a KE70 Corolla. It is also getting a bigger alternator. (70amp) from hilux.

    The car got a 4 row radiator core when the engine was done and a thermo switch fitting scrounged from a bent Peugeot 504 was added to the bottom tank. Further sacrelige is planned in the form of adapting a Pug 405 cooling fan to fit into the D fan shroud.

    Some pictures may appear soon. I hope!

    Bruce.

  16. #16
    VIP Sponsor richo's Avatar
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    Ben, looks like it is going along well.
    Welding end result depends on how much tim you want to spend on the tidy up. You can be there for ages doing it if you're prepared to put in the time.
    Good stuff, much better than the average repairs by some of the so called "experts".

  17. #17
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    A few more detail shots. As I say this paint was wrong so I took it to a Paintshop and subsequently everything (well contrary my instructions - not everything) got abrasive blasted and repainted. A few shots showing the paint could be pulled off with masking tape (due mainly to the use of rust gobbler being used on everything, including rust free metal.)





















    The date on the photos is 15th July 2011. I had wanted to get the car done by my sisters wedding at the end of January 2012. It would soon be leading up to the busy time for my work as a furniture maker when people start thinking they need a new cabinet or dining table "in time for Christmas"

    So the last couple of months has been long days, 7 days a week (well, shorter days in the weekend!) either working on the car or trying to make money. Cleaning and polishing till 10 or 11pm so no time to document here at the time.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-428.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-429.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-430.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-431.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-432.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-433.jpg  

    Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-434.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-427.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-436.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-447.jpg  

  18. #18
    Member DSuper's Avatar
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    Default Before and After

    As some relief from my major cock-ups, I will show some small triumphs.

    Reverse lights: I wasn't so impressed with the result... until I looked at the before photos!





    Left!






    Components separated for plating and cleaning.





    The light holder pushed out (carefully). I left the rubber seal around the edge - it looked fragile, didn't want to hunt for a replacement.

    The muck would not clean off the back. It was like underseal, but was probably layers of dirt and tar. I had to carefully scrape it off with a sharp blade taking care not to gouge or mark the chrome(d plastic) I think you can buy genuine Cibie replacement lights but the have a grey plastic back.



    Ta Dah.



    Lens slightly rust tinged and murky.





    Stone dents in the back







    Dropped a washer when removing it to photograph lights. Lucky this dude has magnetic feet and found it for me.



    Golly this is time consuming - hope it is less boring for you. I'd better go make some tea and will post more "before and after" later.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-682.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-684.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-687.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-689.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-690.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-119.jpg  

    Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-120.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-121.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-118a.jpg  
    Last edited by DSuper; 13th February 2012 at 09:03 PM.

  19. #19
    VIP Sponsor richo's Avatar
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    Nice work on the reversing light.
    That's tedious work, the cleaning without damaging the surface finish, commendable.
    Your smiling mate with the ferric feet, very handy ;-)

  20. #20
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Nice .... These piccies will make that car very easy to sell if you ever want to as well. You know how you can never tell how rusty a car is "underneath" ..... Well you have photographic evidence that this one is good.

    I figure I'll avoid pulling the ID's roof at all costs .... that way I don't need to figure out how I'm going to fix it We pulled the roof on my fathers DS23 and it's probably as bad as yours (the roof rail that is) and will need to front section replaced. You couldn't tell it was rusty until the roof was lifted off!

    seeya,
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  21. #21
    Member DSuper's Avatar
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    Default Before and After

    OK - maybe not so impressive, but I've upload the photos now, so you're going to see them.





    Should the part on the door be 'yellow plated' too, or body coloured.







    Base of catch not plated because it was both grey and yellow!!?







    I hear that you should wax chrome to stop it (and its substrate) rusting. Should I wax or grease these things in their entireity to preserve them longer (I know they may not stay yellow long anyway)
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-203.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-126.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-207.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-125.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-215.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-128.jpg  


  22. #22
    Member DSuper's Avatar
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    Default Befroe an After: Fuel Breather

    I Carefully pried/ worked this thing apart, cleaned parts plated parts and just pushed it back together again.





    The filters are similar to in the air cleaner on the engine

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-700.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-775.jpg   Nut and bolt restoration on a '72 DSuper-124.jpg  
    Last edited by DSuper; 13th February 2012 at 09:18 PM. Reason: spelling

  23. #23
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DSuper View Post
    I Carefully pried/ worked this thing apart, cleaned parts plated parts and just pushed it back together again.





    The filters are similar to in the air cleaner on the engine

    The reseviour lid comes apart in the same way as that gearbox breather if you want to have it plated

    seeya,
    shane L.
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    '78 GS1220 pallas
    '92 Range Rover Classic ... 5spd manual.

    Yay ... No Slugomatics


    Modern Junk:
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  24. #24
    Fellow Frogger! CorneSoutAfrica's Avatar
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    Wow!!

    You are doing amazing work, are you sure you're not a full time classic car restorer

    Great job on the roof!! That's just spectacular, this will be one very fine DS

    Keep up the great work!!

    Cheers
    Corne
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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleChevron View Post
    Nice .... These piccies will make that car very easy to sell if you ever want to as well. You know how you can never tell how rusty a car is "underneath" ..... Well you have photographic evidence that this one is good.

    I figure I'll avoid pulling the ID's roof at all costs .... that way I don't need to figure out how I'm going to fix it We pulled the roof on my fathers DS23 and it's probably as bad as yours (the roof rail that is) and will need to front section replaced. You couldn't tell it was rusty until the roof was lifted off!

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    Its when that one screw hanging all the trim on the front together pops that it become obvious. Mine was not obvious, it was still passing WOF's (warrants of fitness) OK, but I knew it needed doing.

    You'd be the one to fix any problems if found.

    Quote Originally Posted by CorneSoutAfrica View Post
    Wow!!

    You are doing amazing work, are you sure you're not a full time classic car restorer

    Great job on the roof!! That's just spectacular, this will be one very fine DS

    Keep up the great work!!

    Cheers
    Corne
    Thanks. Was full time for a month there. Now just taking an intake of breath thinking where to from here.

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