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Thread: early C5 suspension questions

  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by gerry freed View Post
    I was always very happy with the suspension on my C5. It could be caught out on certain surfaces, but essentially it gave a very comfortable ride with excellent handling and stability in all conditions.
    Once it started to give problems I threw the car away. The repair costs and the uncertainties created by the poor knowledge of the system by even French CitroŽn mechanics meant it was a time to cut my losses and move into a new car.

    I thought you junked that C5 due to an uneconomic to repair rear brake problem???

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    Quote Originally Posted by gerry freed View Post
    I was always very happy with the suspension on my C5. It could be caught out on certain surfaces, but essentially it gave a very comfortable ride with excellent handling and stability in all conditions.
    Once it started to give problems I threw the car away. The repair costs and the uncertainties created by the poor knowledge of the system by even French CitroŽn mechanics meant it was a time to cut my losses and move into a new car.
    Wise man indeed, wish i could afford to move on but!!!, And resale price has dropped so low I would be better off cutting my loss and leaving it on the side of the road to save on transfer fees. JOKING.

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by shanadoo View Post
    Ah! perhaps I didn't explain it right. Suspension on high is firm, as it should be, drive off letting the computer take control and when it lowers to normal height after the 40kph mark, the ride is probably nearer to normal. But it never seems to last for long, I've never recorded the time or distance, probably because the ride hardens over a indefinite period. There's no side sway, no boating, goes up on door opening, down on boot opening, down on lock, everything working as it should. Rear wheel track has been checked,
    And I've just noticed it's lost one rear bump rubber and the other is without its center plug. They were there on Thursday evening. Ah me, at witts end.

    Interestingly, and here I'm speaking only about those world wide Citroen C5 forums and I'm starting to see double after two days at the computer seeking info, but this seems to be a fairly regular complaint with the Hydractive 3 suspension. All sorts of diagnostics and could be fixes have turned up zero. It appears that when all else fails, blame the BHI unit, but no one seems willing to pay $2500 dollars for a new unit, just in the hope it fixes the problem. Some people claimed to be fitting second hand units but there's been no follow up forum posts, so we don't know either way. And they're to far out of date to warrant posting an inquiry.
    Also interestingly, a lot of these bloggers are "dyed in the wool" Cit owners who say they're disappointed with the C5s ride and wish they'd never gotten rid of their BX or whatever. Even those with the Hydractrive 3+ suspension voice displeasure. and they're supposed to be much better.
    We don't seem to hear much about the good ones, cars or dealers, I guess well pleased owners have little need to post on a forum.
    For me I'm pleased with the Cit now that I've sorted out all its faults. Suspension aside. It's a great car, but it has been an expensive one.
    Just wish I could get it to ride better without spending another squillion $s, it sort of spoils the fun. Once more unto the breach dear friends, once more.
    Talk about unto the breach. Just ordered bump stop rubbers. Ex France 3 weeks. Have to devise something for a temp fix. Can't do without car for that long, last time it was nearly 2 months. Tried all over the world, stops not carried for C5. And seeing as how the C5 sits only about 12mm off the stops when empty and stationary, [probably part of the ride problems] I'm not game to drive it without them. Chance of strut or sphere damage I reckon.
    GGGGRR

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by David S View Post
    I thought you junked that C5 due to an uneconomic to repair rear brake problem???
    No, it started as a soggy brake pedal which I hoped was due to air in the system and I asked a friend who is a CitroŽn mechanic to bleed the brakes, since it needs computer intervention when you have the ESP fitted. He suggested changing the master cylinder first. After trade discount the special version for the ESP cost me 300 euros. I was ill with the flu and slept in his showroom while he did the work and never saw exactly what he did. When he drove the car off the lift I pointed out the pool of fluid on the floor which he wasn't concerned about and said his apprentice would clear up. On the test drive the brakes were just the same so I had wasted 300euros and the fault lay elsewhere. However, we ran out of suspension during the test. When he put back on the lift, the last of the suspension fluid poured out of a rear cylinder.
    I then spotted that the piston had disengaged from the swinging arm. Apparently while he was removing and replacing the wheels to do the bleeding he had the suspension depressurised. On closer inspection I found that where the clip is normally fitted to retain the piston, in one side of the cup there was the head of a cotter pin of the kind sold in hardware stores. It took a lot of force and effort from both of us to get the piston back in the cylinder and it was unlikely that it was undamaged being bashed with the road movements during the test. He then replaced the fluid which is no cheap affair and we rang the other CitroŽn garage that had changed the split gaiter on that cylinder, a few months previously. They wanted to see the car and so I drove it round and they admitted liability and agreed to pay my friend for his work. However, the suspension was not working properly and it was not possible to diagnose how much was damaged by running without fluid, with a damaged piston and an unresponsive height corrector. I then faced an unknown bill of several thousand euros, lack of use of the car, the brake problem and a protracted legal case which here can take 5 years. I had Australian visitors coming the following week with whom we wanted to spend time touring. So I quit, having lost confidence in the local repair facilities and sent the car to the wreckers, also having just spent 100 euros on having it detailed to look smart for the visitors.
    My plan had been to hang on to it for two more years and then buy an EV for the rest of my driving days. They were not yet available in quantity and so I was pushed into a compromise and bought a hybrid, which PSA do not yet make. While I live in this town I will certainly not own another modern CitroÍn, as I cannot trust the maintenance facilities.
    So far the warranty claims on my Japanese Honda are zero and I hope it stays that way because the dealer network is sparse. The first service is after one year and most of the components are sealed for life, with a 10 year guarantee on the 100volt electrics and battery.
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    Last edited by gerry freed; 14th March 2011 at 07:04 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by gerry freed View Post
    No, it started as a soggy brake pedal which I hoped was due to air in the system and I asked a friend who is a CitroŽn mechanic to bleed the brakes, since it needs computer intervention when you have the ESP fitted. He suggested changing the master cylinder first. After trade discount the special version for the ESP cost me 300 euros. I was ill with the flu and slept in his showroom while he did the work and never saw exactly what he did. When he drove the car off the lift I pointed out the pool of fluid on the floor which he wasn't concerned about and said his apprentice would clear up. On the test drive the brakes were just the same so I had wasted 300euros and the fault lay elsewhere. However, we ran out of suspension during the test. When he put back on the lift, the last of the suspension fluid poured out of a rear cylinder.
    I then spotted that the piston had disengaged from the swinging arm. Apparently while he was removing and replacing the wheels to do the bleeding he had the suspension depressurised. On closer inspection I found that where the clip is normally fitted to retain the piston, in one side of the cup there was the head of a cotter pin of the kind sold in hardware stores. It took a lot of force and effort from both of us to get the piston back in the cylinder and it was unlikely that it was undamaged being bashed with the road movements during the test. He then replaced the fluid which is no cheap affair and we rang the other CitroŽn garage that had changed the split gaiter on that cylinder, a few months previously. They wanted to see the car and so I drove it round and they admitted liability and agreed to pay my friend for his work. However, the suspension was not working properly and it was not possible to diagnose how much was damaged by running without fluid, with a damaged piston and an unresponsive height corrector. I then faced an unknown bill of several thousand euros, lack of use of the car, the brake problem and a protracted legal case which here can take 5 years. I had Australian visitors coming the following week with whom we wanted to spend time touring. So I quit, having lost confidence in the local repair facilities and sent the car to the wreckers, also having just spent 100 euros on having it detailed to look smart for the visitors.
    My plan had been to hang on to it for two more years and then buy an EV for the rest of my driving days. They were not yet available in quantity and so I was pushed into a compromise and bought a hybrid, which PSA do not yet make. While I live in this town I will certainly not own another modern CitroÍn, as I cannot trust the maintenance facilities.
    So far the warranty claims on my Japanese Honda are zero and I hope it stays that way because the dealer network is sparse. The first service is after one year and most of the components are sealed for life, with a 10 year guarantee on the 100volt electrics and battery.
    Ouch. I'd have done the same I think. I imagine you're enjoying the new purchase?
    JohnW

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    Enjoy is not perhaps the right word. I call it the "ordi ŗ quatre pattes". The computer on four paws.
    It is highly computerised and makes all the decisions about acceleration and braking to minimise consumption. All that is left for me to to is to tell it where to go and when to stop for the traffic conditions. It is the laziest form of driving I have ever encountered and is like a computer game at the beginners level.
    If you want, you can override the computer and use its virtual seven gear box to flit through the traffic like an MX5 or Subaru WRX. If you do, it loses its point - better to buy a sports car and be done with it.
    For low running costs, virtually no maintenance and minimal intrusion into listening to the radio it is perfect. There is still a surprise every time I turn the key and it moves off in silence and when the engine stops at the traffic lights. The Honda build quality is as close to perfection as one gets and the doors close with a fit that Rolls would envy. One day I will read the 480 page instruction book.

    It is not a statement of technology and form like a DS, it is an invisible Tadis.

    I enjoy cars and driving, nothing more so than in my H van - this is painless transport not fun.
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    Quote Originally Posted by gerry freed View Post
    Enjoy is not perhaps the right word. I call it the "ordi ŗ quatre pattes". The computer on four paws.
    It is highly computerised and makes all the decisions about acceleration and braking to minimise consumption. All that is left for me to to is to tell it where to go and when to stop for the traffic conditions. It is the laziest form of driving I have ever encountered and is like a computer game at the beginners level.
    If you want, you can override the computer and use its virtual seven gear box to flit through the traffic like an MX5 or Subaru WRX. If you do, it loses its point - better to buy a sports car and be done with it.
    For low running costs, virtually no maintenance and minimal intrusion into listening to the radio it is perfect. There is still a surprise every time I turn the key and it moves off in silence and when the engine stops at the traffic lights. The Honda build quality is as close to perfection as one gets and the doors close with a fit that Rolls would envy. One day I will read the 480 page instruction book.

    It is not a statement of technology and form like a DS, it is an invisible Tadis.

    I enjoy cars and driving, nothing more so than in my H van - this is painless transport not fun.
    Thanks Gerry. Fascinating. As you say, not "driving" but pretty effective in its way. We experienced a Prius in San Francisco this year - amazing car. I'd better stop hijacking this thread!
    JohnW

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  8. #33
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    Yes I agree they don't ride as well as the Hydractive 3+. I think Citroen tried to build a cheaper modern styled car using sphere suspension but with as few complications as possible.
    Hence 4 only spheres, but with a new shape and special diaphrams, heavy torsion bars, and as few electronic sensors as they could get away with. But is seems after the test car did a few midnight burns down the Champs Elysees, the street ladies complained the ride wasn't up to the standard they were hoping for. But production went ahead anyway,
    well it pays the wages, whilst modifications were hurriedly brought forward. They threw in a couple of extra spheres, some load firmness regulators, modified the BHI, threw a whole box full of sensors at it and did a lot of other stuff with street ladies. And the result, designated 3+, was much better. Now the street ladies were happy and, I suspect this 3+ was on the board quite early in the piece, and the simpler Hydractive 3 was only a stop gap to reduce production costs, which for many of us around the world now means we're stuck with something very much shunned by french street ladies.

    However, those speed bumps I refer to are those mountainous curb high monstrosities designed by some body styling kit manufacturer. They have an over wide pedestrian crossing on top and cliff face drop offs, and their main function appears to be the destruction of plastic bodywork and making Citroen C5 drivers seek a detour. Ah well.

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    After [BX,Xantia,CX,GS] the basic C5 feels quite disappointing. I changed ours to sit on comfort spheres and it is nice and soft. Suits to my taste.

    Unfortunately everything else starts to fall into bits now and I can't keep up with the repairs because I have CX,GS examples to look after
    I still need to keep ours for 3-5 years before I update for a later model C5... or find a mint diesel CX Wagon (quite unlikely to find anything my wife would approve of, unfortunately).

    Maybe I can buy yours for a parts car later
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    Quote Originally Posted by kimmo View Post
    After [BX,Xantia,CX,GS] the basic C5 feels quite disappointing. I changed ours to sit on comfort spheres and it is nice and soft. Suits to my taste.

    Unfortunately everything else starts to fall into bits now and I can't keep up with the repairs because I have CX,GS examples to look after
    I still need to keep ours for 3-5 years before I update for a later model C5... or find a mint diesel CX Wagon (quite unlikely to find anything my wife would approve of, unfortunately).

    Maybe I can buy yours for a parts car later
    Sorry kimmo not for sale!!!!!YET.

    However it looks like I've solved the problem, "and about time" says her alongside.
    It appears I've either got a Monday morning or Friday arvo car, because the problem appears to have been the front height sensor being badly [might I dare say "carelessly] fitted by the factory.
    The alignment between the height sensor and the actuating arm on the torsion bar was so bad that the ball end link which connects the two was fouling on the cover protecting the sensor. Fouling so badly that the sensor actually twisted on its mounting as the torsion bar rotated until the pressure became so great that it sprung free only to jam again as it returned to the center position.
    A simple realignment, by sliding the actuating unit along the bar and a reset of the height, [I reckoned it was always too low in the front, practically sitting on the bump stops as it did] If anyone is interested, the thickness of a soft pencil line will give you 5mm height difference either way.
    So now I think the ride is about the best I would expect from a C5 with only a hydrastatic 3 and standard spheres, [not 3+ which has more of everything].
    And I get side sway over the uneven road bits now, never did before, it always sat like a stone.
    I only jacked it up to do a pad change, but thought while it's up the belly and I might as well squeeze ourselves under for a look see. Don't know why I didn't do it before now. The rear is easy to get at and I was always going to raise the front height but, it became another one of those gunner jobs waiting for something positive to eventuate I suppose. Although many more miles with the sensor twisting the way it was and something very positive would've certainly been the case. I'm so glad it wasn't made in Italy, 89.000Ks would be really stretching the friendship.
    Not saying this could be the fault with every C5 with a C & B front end, but for me it explains quite a lot, so for anyone else it's gotta be worth a look. And without trying to explain the theory behind it I would most definitely check the vehicle height.
    "Each pie has a different crust but it's the filling which makes the worth"

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    Quote Originally Posted by shanadoo View Post
    Sorry kimmo not for sale!!!!!YET.

    However it looks like I've solved the problem, "and about time" says her alongside.
    It appears I've either got a Monday morning or Friday arvo car, because the problem appears to have been the front height sensor being badly [might I dare say "carelessly] fitted by the factory.
    The alignment between the height sensor and the actuating arm on the torsion bar was so bad that the ball end link which connects the two was fouling on the cover protecting the sensor. Fouling so badly that the sensor actually twisted on its mounting as the torsion bar rotated until the pressure became so great that it sprung free only to jam again as it returned to the center position.
    A simple realignment, by sliding the actuating unit along the bar and a reset of the height, [I reckoned it was always too low in the front, practically sitting on the bump stops as it did] If anyone is interested, the thickness of a soft pencil line will give you 5mm height difference either way.
    So now I think the ride is about the best I would expect from a C5 with only a hydrastatic 3 and standard spheres, [not 3+ which has more of everything].
    And I get side sway over the uneven road bits now, never did before, it always sat like a stone.
    I only jacked it up to do a pad change, but thought while it's up the belly and I might as well squeeze ourselves under for a look see. Don't know why I didn't do it before now. The rear is easy to get at and I was always going to raise the front height but, it became another one of those gunner jobs waiting for something positive to eventuate I suppose. Although many more miles with the sensor twisting the way it was and something very positive would've certainly been the case. I'm so glad it wasn't made in Italy, 89.000Ks would be really stretching the friendship.
    Not saying this could be the fault with every C5 with a C & B front end, but for me it explains quite a lot, so for anyone else it's gotta be worth a look. And without trying to explain the theory behind it I would most definitely check the vehicle height.
    "Each pie has a different crust but it's the filling which makes the worth"
    Good news! Glad you've fixed it.
    JohnW

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    Very good news indeed!
    I had a problem with the rear height corrector after I had removed the rear swing arms - I somehow managed to install the anti-roll bar wrong way round and the rear of the car kept on going up and down
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    Quote Originally Posted by kimmo View Post
    Very good news indeed!
    I had a problem with the rear height corrector after I had removed the rear swing arms - I somehow managed to install the anti-roll bar wrong way round and the rear of the car kept on going up and down
    The French ladies of the midnight hour may have enjoyed that!!.

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    I found a solution to your problem. There is what looks like a very nice CX 2500 auto for sale up your way.

    1985 Citroen CX2500 GTi

    No crazy electronics and a beautiful ride. You can even get the A/C to work pretty well with a few mods. Plus the best looking sedan ever
    Mine

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    Toyota Prius

    In the family

    Xantia SX

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    Apparently Citroen developed anti-roll suspension in the late 1940's yet didn't use it, but it puzzles me why a height corrector wasn't fitted to each wheel (4) and not just one on each roll bar (2)? I suppose doing the witches' hat handling test may catch it out if opposite side became soft to compensate then really cause a boat at sea reaction. Volvo developed something similar to the Activa / LR Discovery many years earlier and also didn't use it, then what ever happened to the magical Bose electronic magnet suspension? (check it out on YouTube) Apparently there is an after market truck seat that is the only product that employs this Bose technology available. Obviously costs influence what goes to market. So sad that Citroen has made their hydraulic suspension a very rare option. Obviously the Peugeot accountants hard at work😉

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    M. Jinandfonic,

    The concept of anti roll was in practice in the experimental cars along with 4 wheel steering, the real world production offshoot was the Xantia Activa, which can hydraulically "tune" the anti roll bars. In reality there is time delay in adding or removing hydraulic fluids, the abundance of extra fluid supply and spheres to do the roll bar tuning, the time taken to pressurise the extra spheres ( iirc 10 ?? in all )...
    The on road behavior of a Xantia Activa was less fluid than a normal Xantia ( and to some the whole point of hydropneumatics was the long travel supple ride ). These anti roll Xantia also used sporting and harder lower profile tyres that also contributed to less glide and float.
    The Hydractive system with the extra sphere front and rear means the switch from soft mode to hard mode can be done electronically in milliseconds and the "Softness" ability can be restored at the same speed. In opting in or out with the centre sphere per axle the roll stiffness is changed + / - about 25 to 35% ( ??? ) anyway. The Hydractive system means response to speed ( lowering front height above 110 k/hour, and increasing it if regular bumps are encountered. ( My C5 reacts to the Story Bridge expansion joints, just in time to encounter the next one and thus it reacts about 4 times in the space of the bridge .. not that passengers notice the trim change.
    One argument given for the demise of the powered steering was the fluid demand ( and CXs without good accumulator storage run out of assistance in the Diravi ) ... as well as the noise associated with high pressure fluid movement.

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    True, the height correction does take time, too much for cornering correction. The 2CV mechanical linkage adjusts front to back. I've not driven in one yet can imagine this would induce see sawing during heavy braking or acceleration (😉if possible?) The BMC systems are spilt diagonally? via fluid. A friend had a 1100 Morris & that was sweet little chassis. Mid corner bumps didn't upset it as much as implied. My C4 feels as if it's roll bars (especially the rear) are too resistant. Crossing a speed bump straight on shows it has the travel & suppleness. Take the same hump diagonally & one's head nearly hits the window. It works best as a press on touring device where it really does handle well. It would be nice to be able to swap characteristics. A roll bar with viscous coupling or even a disc brake at centre that can be disabled or engaged for around town would be a nice mod.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Jinandfonic View Post
    True, the height correction does take time, too much for cornering correction. The 2CV mechanical linkage adjusts front to back. I've not driven in one yet can imagine this would induce see sawing during heavy braking or acceleration (if possible?) The BMC systems are spilt diagonally? via fluid. A friend had a 1100 Morris & that was sweet little chassis. Mid corner bumps didn't upset it as much as implied. My C4 feels as if it's roll bars (especially the rear) are too resistant. Crossing a speed bump straight on shows it has the travel & suppleness. Take the same hump diagonally & one's head nearly hits the window. It works best as a press on touring device where it really does handle well. It would be nice to be able to swap characteristics. A roll bar with viscous coupling or even a disc brake at centre that can be disabled or engaged for around town would be a nice mod.
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    Hi
    A few comments.
    The height corrections on Citroens(and others) have the time lag built in to prevent instant changes. If required they could work fast.

    The 2 CV and the BMC fluid interconnection are the same principle. The BMC system was not connected diagonally but front to rear each side. They should really be looked at differently than the advertising on the day implied. The interconnecting was to adjust the pitch frequency to a low desired level on a small car with very little pitch inertia. To try and eliminate the jiggly ride small cars usually had.

    The modern cars, like the C4 obviously, have a different problem. The roll frequency has been adjusted to be very stiff by the interconnection with stiff anti roll bars. This is because people want to feel that the cars "handle" great They can throw them around on the low profile tires and feel good about it The crap ride seems to be a sacrifice the designers have made to the modern fashion.

    Some years back, some 4WDs did have disengageable anti roll bars so the off road ability was improved. However this seems to have disappeared ? People drive them like racing cars now too

    jaahn

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by shanadoo View Post
    Thanks andy

    It's a 2003 Hdi with just 90.000 ks , I don't enjoy driving it much because it's such a pig, with my back problem. There's plenty of suspension travel and at times becomes even unsettlingly floaty, as though the computer can't react quickly enough to directional change. Like when pushed over winding mountain roads. Mostly it's just like the suspension was totally seized, and yet it is far from that. I think I'm right in saying the computer is not reactive enough, being programed to hold the wheel at the nominal flat running height, ie distance from the chassis to the axle center, instead of allowing it to follow the contours of the road surface.
    Probably why most of those early Cits rode like a dray and you could take a wheel off and drive around to save tyre wear. The suspension was only concerned with point to point settings, allowing very little variation for road surface contours. And now in later times why these comfort spheres are claimed to give a superior ride. I may be wrong but remember those vehicles with what we may have jokingly referred to as having a wallowing ride?, they didn't seem to have this bump and crash problem.
    Maybe i've got a sensor problem, with the car that is, not me personally. And have you noticed how soft the C6 is on its suspension?.
    You need some perspective ... Wanna try a low milage 407 HDi ...... It rides luck a bucket of sh!t.

    The answer is to find yourself a nice old CX or DS. I might try an X7 series C5 someday too.

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    Proper cars--
    '85 Series II CX2500 GTi Turbo I
    '63 ID19 http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/citro%EBn-forum/90325-best-project-car-you-have-ever-seen.html
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas (last looked at ... about 15years ago)
    '78 GS1220 pallas
    '92 Range Rover Classic ... 5spd manual.

    Yay ... No Slugomatics


    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual

  20. #45
    1000+ Posts Greg C's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fritzelhund View Post
    M. Jinandfonic,
    One argument given for the demise of the powered steering was the fluid demand ( and CXs without good accumulator storage run out of assistance in the Diravi ) ... as well as the noise associated with high pressure fluid movement.
    Agreed with running out of assistance on a CX, maybe they should have put in an extra steering accumulator but problems with the associated noise. What noise? Only that gorgeous soft hiss as you walk away from a CX or D as it corrects back to the right height. Well at least mine used to do it, it takes too long now. Maybe I need to clean the height correctors.
    Mine

    CX Prestige
    Toyota Prius

    In the family

    Xantia SX

  21. #46
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg C View Post
    Agreed with running out of assistance on a CX, maybe they should have put in an extra steering accumulator but problems with the associated noise. What noise? Only that gorgeous soft hiss as you walk away from a CX or D as it corrects back to the right height. Well at least mine used to do it, it takes too long now. Maybe I need to clean the height correctors.
    Steering == pump capacity ..... later 5cylinder pumps have a higher capacity and work well with diravi steering.

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    Last edited by DoubleChevron; 23rd October 2013 at 01:04 PM.
    'Cit' homepage:
    Citroen Workshop
    Proper cars--
    '85 Series II CX2500 GTi Turbo I
    '63 ID19 http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/showthread.php?t=90325
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas (last looked at ... about 15years ago)
    '78 GS1220 pallas
    '92 Range Rover Classic ... 5spd manual.

    Yay ... No Slugomatics


    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual

  22. #47
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Grumble grumble grumble .. Click
    grumble grumble grumble .....Click
    Hisssss, click, hisssss click, grumble grumble grumble.

    My wife used to get annoyed with me when I would make hydraulic hissing noises emulating a BVH when driving an automatic. It was hun though ... as was playing Beethoven's 5th symphony ( first movement ) on country roads using only the air horns.

  23. #48
    Fellow Frogger! Jinandfonic's Avatar
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    I have driven an 2010 X7 C5 and thought it was too floaty. I sampled an earlier low km 2006 C5 & found the car crashed badly over bridge joints etc. I now know why. It is the Michelin tyres. They solidify with age more so than others. The X7 C5 had squishy Continentals fitted. Young Michelins provide the best experience in my opinion yet obviously not economically sensible.


    Via the aussiefrogs App
    Citroen C5 II manual '05; C4 Exculsive '07; Citroen CX2200 Pallas '76; CX2400 C-matic Pallas '78

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jinandfonic View Post
    I have driven an 2010 X7 C5 and thought it was too floaty. I sampled an earlier low km 2006 C5 & found the car crashed badly over bridge joints etc. I now know why. It is the Michelin tyres. They solidify with age more so than others. The X7 C5 had squishy Continentals fitted. Young Michelins provide the best experience in my opinion yet obviously not economically sensible.


    Via the aussiefrogs App
    Yes I agree, Michelins give a hard ride, always have with their steel cord. Tried two sets on my C5 HDi, then went to Goodyear, excellent ride, but noisy as hell on the back, and I reckon you could measure the wear on a daily basis. I now use Maxis, quiet on road at all speeds with good grip, they give a softer ride and seem to suit the C5 perfectly. They also appear to be lasting really well on the front. Which was another C5 failing with tires.

  25. #50
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    early C5 suspension questions-citroen_78.jpgearly C5 suspension questions-citroen_80.jpgearly C5 suspension questions-citroen_81.jpgearly C5 suspension questions-citroen_83.jpgearly C5 suspension questions-citroen_92.jpg
    The problem I am having with the C5 2003 HDi Sedan 160.000km is that after a 4 wheel removal for re-balancing of all the wheels the rear suspension has become very stiff. Fronts are fine as they are independent of each other. I noticed that when inspecting the rear spheres the gaitor flexible rubbers are cracked and have leaked some fluids. The hydraulic system works fine when adjusting heights etc. I have attached some pics just in case. Please PM when responding. Tx

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