Timing Belt on C5
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  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Default Timing Belt on C5

    Hi

    How hard is it to change the timing belt on a 2.0 litre petrol C5?

    Are any special tools required? Pullers etc.. to change bearings?

    Regards

    Alan

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  2. #2
    Tadpole
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    I assume you are aware if you get this wrong what damages you can do IMHO not worth it get an expert to do it but admire your determination to do it yourself Alan

    laurie

  3. #3
    jmn
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    Alan.
    In the "olden days" car makers would have reference notches to line up with. No more, unless you have the car maker's kit for this job (expensive) don't even think about doing it. Without the kit the cogs will move under tension and you will have an immobile car.
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  4. #4
    1000+ Posts Ken W's Avatar
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    Hey Fellas,

    Where is your sense of adventure. Nothing ventured - nothing gained - but there are always some risks.

    I'm sure I have a mechanics manual for one of these somewhere - yes I even have a Haynes manual. Quick check shows that it does have a procedure for changing the cambelt and even has methods to fabricate the special tools to do it if you can't get them elsewhere.

    So get yourself a Haynes Manual and at least you are keeping up with them technically.

    Cheers,

    Ken W

  5. #5
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Default

    God I admire Ken's sense of adventure but what would worry me more than the mechanicals would be after that first step that says 'Disconnect the Battery' - these days when even the bum warmers have a computer activation I'd be wanting to know what i'm doing from an electrical/electronic point of view.
    Alan, if you can get onto a manual read both sides of the job - perhaps you can hook a battery charger accross the leads b4 you remove the battery.
    PS Alan, how is the new AF on dial up with the new provider -on broadband we are getting a lot better speed - hope it is working better for you.
    Ron
    Those people that say I know - generally don't.

  6. #6
    1000+ Posts Ken W's Avatar
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    Default

    Well Ron,

    I could go on. All you need to be worried about when disconnecting a battery is to make sure you have a the security code for the radio if it has one. So long as you don't do anything silly like disconnect the battery with the ignition still on, I don't think there is too much risk. I was thinking that one should wait for at least a minute after turning off the ignition so that hydractive solenoids and key transponder system all go to sleep before disconnecting the battery. So I checked Haynes C5 manual - they suggest waiting 15 minutes qafter ignition off before disconnecting the battery. When you connect back up it should reinitialise around the multiplex buss OK. Haynes says to wait one minute before starting engine for this to happen and that you may need to reset window and sunroof winders, unlock and lock the wagon tailgate and reprogram the overspeed control settings and language not to speak of the date and time.

    That being said, I did have an experience with a Series 1 Xantia with keypad immobiliser and battery disconnection. Someone has set it up so the immobiliser was not needed to start the car - in service mode or something. However it lost this setting when the battery was disconnected for some time when the car also had a fusebox problem that really disabled the engine ECU. Ater I'd fixed the fusebox I still couldn't understand why the ECU would not pull in the injection and ignition relay when trying to start the car. After quite a few weeks I decided it was likely to be the immobiliser so I started entering codes. Luckily it all came good on code 0001 and AF came to the rescue with instructions on how to disable it again.


    Cheers,

    Ken W

    PS I must update my picture

  7. #7
    Fellow Frogger
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    Alan, I think you should leave it alone unless you are really sure of what you are doing and have the right tools. If you get it wrong, it could cost you a motor rebuild. You need at least the correct locking pins to lock the cams/flywheel and be aware that the pulley on the crank probably freewheels when the bolt is undone.

  8. #8
    Fellow Frogger! Ceenine's Avatar
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    I took the battery out of the C5 the other day to recharge it (3 hours) put it back in and didn't even need to recode the radio. How easy is that?

    Now I must find out why the battery is going flat overnight.
    2014 C5 2.2 HDI Limited Edition Sedan
    2007 C5 2.2 HDI Hatchback
    2007 C4 1.6 HDI EGS Sedan
    Peugeot Mi16 Series 2

  9. #9
    Fellow Frogger! Ceenine's Avatar
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    ]Alan, I think you should leave it alone unless you are really sure of what you are doing and have the right tools. If you get it wrong, it could cost you a motor rebuild.

    So what is the drama. With a late model car like the C5, genuine spares are easy to come by and you get to learn how to pull a motor apart(and put it back together).

    Apart from the correct locking tools what does a qualified mechanic have in skills over an owner. He doubtless would take 1.5 hours to change a belt whereas the owner would take 3.0 and would need a properly calibrated torque wrench as opposed to a cheap Chinese job.

    There is no sense of adventure around these days.

    I think for my next car I will go back to will be a thoroughly restored Xantia diesel. I can play with that to my heart's content. It won't warn me when the seatbelts in the back aren't clicked or the rear vision mirror won't fold in when I lock the car but I will learn to live without those as I did for the first 40 years of motoring.
    2014 C5 2.2 HDI Limited Edition Sedan
    2007 C5 2.2 HDI Hatchback
    2007 C4 1.6 HDI EGS Sedan
    Peugeot Mi16 Series 2

  10. #10
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Default Thanks

    Thanks to all of you who replied.

    I've decided to get it done by a mechanic.

    There just too much at stake for a novice like myself.

    Regards

    Alan

  11. #11
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    Default Old conservative owners?

    Hi Alan,
    Well they say a C5 is an old mans car Looking at the replys here I can see why . What a lod of doomsdayers and naysayers!!! Don't touch it it might bite

    I do all my own work on mine and have a manual. It's a car for g-ds sake, not a piece of art or sculpture. It's put together with nuts and bolts and wires just like any other car today. Sure its a bit complicated but that's how new cars deliver the benefits over the old models.

    If you are a carefull worker and have some reasonable experience and can read a manual then it's not beyond you. In fact I can say that my car was "professionally" serviced before I got it and they made a botch of the job and some faults were still existing that I had to fix. Not complicated things but caused by the mechanic. The cost for that job has to be seen to be believed so be carefull who you get to do it. And get a fixed quote.

    The actual markings and alignment for the pulleys is slightly more complicated that just a straight set of lines and dots, but not too hard to understand if you can read. The idea is to make the timing as accurate as possible so the parts are all pegged with the belt on and the pulleys are then tightened. You can use bolts or drills ground to size for the pegs. The sizes are in the book. Not too hard and high precision is not necessary for them. The same goes for the tensioners. Read the book and it is ok. The kits are available from advertisers here or on the net etc at good prices compared to "Genuine" parts. Overseas its seems to be common to do normal servicing like this without the rhetoric we get on this forum.

    The myths about the electrical system seem to grow to enormous heights. I might send in the 'Myth Busters' Like most new cars if you disconnect the battery and reconnect it, surprise, it will work OK. . How else would you design a car?? It may forget some minor triming adjustments, eg the windows setting and the auto / driver setings etc but if you do nothing it just learns these again, anyway as it goes. You can reset them quicker if you like. The radio has no code because you could not steal it if you tried!!
    Jaahn

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