did you replace Valve seals yourself?
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  1. #1
    Tadpole
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    did you replace Valve seals yourself?

    Well... would you be so nice and tell me if it's very difficult? Do i need special Cit tools? Are there any pitfalls?
    Somebody on the XM list already told me to push a rope in the sparkplug hole, thus filling up the cylinder to prevent the valve falling in.. funny technique, instead of compressed air.. but seems OK.

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  2. #2
    Moderator Alan S's Avatar
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    Hi Paul,

    Out here in Oz I can't say that I've ever heard of anyone using either of the systems that you are speaking about. I personally have heard of both on the UK Citroen BX Tech Forum (now Q & A) & it apparently does work. Personally, the prospect of a collett not seating properly & dropping a valve down the pot scares the hell out of me & being a bit old fahioned, I like to see what's going on inside. I also believe that if a motor has done enough work to need valve seals there has to be a lot of other stuff ready for servicing so why not do it all at the one time.
    If it's any help to you though there is a Japanese site that goes through complete with good pics just what has to be done.
    http://www.page.sannet.ne.jp/moribayashi/di-000102.html

    That may be some help to you. Just a point worthy of note; a woman wrote to the BX Q& A forum a couple of weeks ago with a BX diesel with 535,000 MILES (no misprint) which was still on the original motor. It turned out she worked for a research company & we managed to clobber her for a fair amount of discussion. She told us that their engineers had discovered on petrol engines, that if they were burning oil via the valve stem seals, that they went for lighter grade oil as opposed to normal practice of going thicker. It was found that within a couple of weeks that oil burners via valve stems either dramatically reduced or stopped altogether. They based this on the fact that the oil drained back to the crankcase faster, thereby reducing or eliminating the oil loss via the stem seals. A couple of BX's have tried this & claim it does work. May not work for you, but got to be worth a try.

    Alan S
    If it ain't broke, use a 12" shifter.....that usually does the trick!!

  3. #3
    Tadpole
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    Hi Alan, that's excactly what's been buggin me in the compressed air area. Most garages just "modify" a sparkplug by removing all the glass bits and inner stuff, welding a small tube on it and connecting it to a compressor. You're right, some idiot might stumble and pull off the airhose... there goes a valve... The "rope" idea appealed to me as simple. BTW, what doe you expect to see inside? Been there before (previous car, a BMW) at was'nt very impressed... i was told the seals wear out faster nowadys because of the higher temperature of the engines caused by environment demands. I'll check out the Jap site.... thanks for your reaction.

  4. #4
    Tadpole
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    So, i 've printed out the japanese site, it gives a clear idea of what has to be done. Thank you.
    I wonder, can you buy such a valve-spring-pressing device somewhere or is it "home-made" ? My Russekmanual says, if you don't have this thing, use a pipe and a blow of a hammer.. but remounting will be a problem then...

    regards, Paul

  5. #5
    Moderator Alan S's Avatar
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    Paul,
    I would imagine that the valve spring compressor for this operation would be an "over the counter" item over your way. I would start by asking the question of Andyspares in the UK, after all they now distribute parts for the 3 French brands plus Swedish & German cars. They have a website & the guy who is webmaster is employed permanently by them is called Jon Wood who is also a Cit freak so a question asked directly of him should yield results.
    About the piece of pipe & hammer, that is just to break the seal between the collar & colletts, an old trick from way back.
    As to why i say look around & service, it is my belief that you may have a valve starting to leak which will cause it to burn out in the future. This would be detected upon removal & could be replaced or refaced, you could also have a heavy carbon build up due to the burning of the oil which has been leaking down the valve stems which in turn may cause pinging & loss of power as well as increased fuel consumption, again this would be cleaned off whilst the head was removed.
    Just me I suppose; I come from the "if a job's worth doing it's - - - - -" school.

    All the best. Can't talk you into trying the thinner oil trick though

    Alan S
    If it ain't broke, use a 12" shifter.....that usually does the trick!!

  6. #6
    Tadpole
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    Hi Alan,

    That's a whole lot of miles for a BX. I suppose it was a diesel, they're known for their reliability at high mileage. Mine's a petrol car, if you don't drive too much in Holland you don't want a diesel. The ownershiptax is twice as high for a diesel, so you have to drive a lot to make it worth. As for hte thinner oil, well, it does make sense.. I'm using regular 15w40 oil from the supermarket right now. I added Wynns smokestop last week, see if that makes a difference...
    goodmornig from a sunny Delft,
    Paul

  7. #7
    1000+ Posts michaelr's Avatar
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    Default

    I thought I should add my question to this ten year old thread , better than starting a new one as although this thread was started to discuss BX valve stem seals it is probably relevant.

    My DS23 has been off the road for over ten years and is now ready for a blue slip (Initial roadworthy check in NSW) except for smoke from the exhaust .

    It seems the more I run it (iding or up and down the driveway) the more smokey it gets. It gives a big cough on start up and then calms down a little, but getting worse. It was not like this a few months ago. The crank case pressure is low (in fact it is negative) and the motor is smooth and reasonably quiet. I suspect of course that valve stem seals are the culprits.

    I am reluctant to do much work until I have the car registered and on the road as then I will be better able to estimate what other jobs, if any, are needed. Can anyone tell me if the inlet valve stem seals can be changed in-situ (as per the "rope in cylinder trick below) on a DS? What parts and tools do I need and where from?
    Michael
    Member, Citroen Car Club NSW

    DS23 Pallas 5 sp. "Francoise" , BX19TRi Auto "Jacques Dutronc" , Teardrop Trailer "The Toad", BMW R65 "Rosamund"
    In the past: Renault 750, Dauphine, R4, R8, R10, Peugeot 504 Familiale, ID 19 (x2), Safari (x2)

  8. #8
    Fellow Frogger! Techbuy's Avatar
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    Default Smokey..

    Quote Originally Posted by michaelr View Post
    My DS23 has been off the road for over ten years and is now ready for a blue slip (Initial roadworthy check in NSW) except for smoke from the exhaust .
    Hello Michael,
    I was talking to Michael (who is restoring a 23) and he suggested as its been unused for so long the rings might be tight in the pistons and its worth taking the plugs out and squirting a small amount of diesel in each of them and leave it for a day or so. He maintains it very often frees the rings and reduces or stops the smokey exhaust.

    I have never tried it myself and a Google search turned up this for what its worth.
    Its worth pressure testing the cylinders as it will soon tell you if the rings are poor.

    Actually you have combined 2 old farmer's techniques we used to do.

    We used diesel to free up a seized engine. You would pour some into each cylinder and let it soak. It frees up the rings.
    Or this if you have a blue smoke
    Plan on a ring job (replacing the piston rings) if blue smoke is coming from your vehicle's tailpipe--blue smoke indicates that oil is getting into your combustion chamber. A ring job involves removing the cylinder heads of your engine and is a major job. If you are an experienced engine mechanic or if you know someone who is and is willing to help you, then plan on spending a whole day replacing your car's piston rings. Otherwise take you vehicle to a garage and have your compression pressure checked--low pressure indicates the need for new piston rings.



    cheers

    Colin
    Last edited by Techbuy; 6th August 2011 at 06:56 PM. Reason: add more info
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    1975 DS23 IE Pallas Auto
    1972 D Special 4Sp
    1/2 a DS23 Auto
    www.ds23.com.au
    Had a 1974 D Special 4Sp (by now reborn as a Toaster)

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