B.B.B.B.B.Berlingo a fault to watch for??
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  1. #1
    Moderator Alan S's Avatar
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    B.B.B.B.B.Berlingo a fault to watch for??

    Just received an e-mail from a guy I know in the UK who has a Berlingo just on 12 months old. Not trying to put the mockers on anyone but it has had a couple of problems and I suppose if you own one and are aware of these, at least you can jump on them quick if they start to appear.
    Here's part of his mail which is self explanatory.

    Not much luck with our Citroen fleet. The Berlingo suffered an electrical
    problem which meant that the cooling fan ran all night, and flat the
    battery. It was taken away by Citroen Assist to the dealer. Diagnosed a
    faulty sensor that had shorted out, causing this problem. Thats the third
    time its been back. The last 2 times were because the Airbag light kept
    coming on. Its only done 10,000 miles, and will be one year old next month.
    The fact that I have little confidence in it, and that the warranty also
    will expire then may mean that we have to reconsider its future. Shame
    really, great car otherwise.

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    Hopefully these are problems which were detected before they decided to bring them out here but who knows?


    Alan S
    If it ain't broke, use a 12" shifter.....that usually does the trick!!

  2. #2
    Local Tyrant gibgib's Avatar
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    Well so far I've had the airbag light stay on until I ignition off/ back on again. That was quite a few months ago & hasn't done it since.
    The engine light also did the same thing about 2 months ago & again that stopped.
    Wish they had of got rid of the spanner from the odometer last time they serviced it telling me it needs a service

  3. #3
    Member Dave B's Avatar
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    I bought a Berlingo in Febuary and the airbag light started flickering recently. The dealer rewired the seatbelt pre-tentioners and the light now behaves itself. Its a common fault on Saxo's as well. I was speaking to a bloke last week who's had 4 altenators on his Berlingo in less than a year, and 10000 miles. They dont make 'em like they used to......
    The bloke with too many BX's

  4. #4
    Local Tyrant gibgib's Avatar
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    4 alternators
    I give mine hell as I have dual battery setup so it's running at full stick all the time topping both up. I had thought of an upgrade (more current o/p) alternator but Continental Cars are not too familar with alternatives I get a flat battery every 2 days & I don't even bother resetting the clock anymore. To get going I bridge the aux battery as normally it's isolated.
    Mine has 25,000k's on it now. It's never been out of Sydney & as I've said above - no major issues yet. in fact it's been great

  5. #5
    Local Tyrant gibgib's Avatar
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    Actually I noticed today while I was washing it that the left hand front tyre is down pretty bad on tread already. All the others seem ok.
    Whats the normal proceedure for rotation?
    Should I go diagonally opposite to rear & vice versa?

  6. #6
    Moderator Alan S's Avatar
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    gibgib,

    The tyre gurus tell me that under no circumstances do you go diagonal on tyre rotation. The argument is that a tyre that has spent its life spinning in one direction can quickly wear the tread off if spun in the opposite one. It has also been claimed that on distance driving it could lead to a blow out also due to overheating
    It apparently needs to be Left front to left rear; right front to right rear and the rears to the correspomding fronts.
    I'll have a talk to the resident head thumper in the house if you like to see if he can come up with a solution to the charging problem as some of his sound gear can flatten a BIG battery in a matter of around 1/2 hour and ask what can be done; he'll probably suggest leaving the van idle all night :p

    Alan S
    If it ain't broke, use a 12" shifter.....that usually does the trick!!

  7. #7
    Local Tyrant gibgib's Avatar
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    Leaving the van idling is a good option. It is also an opportunity for a thieving butthead to jump in & drive away
    Depending on the area I'm working in, I do often do this during the day.
    At night & idling, the alternator cannot keep up with the hazard lights, parking lights, spot lights (on the top) & the inverter running. After 40 or so minutes the engine karks & I hope I'm on a hill

  8. #8
    Member Dave B's Avatar
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    gibgib,

    I've noticed my front tyres are showing wear on the outer edge more than anywere else, the rears are like brand new. I noticed in the handbook that the tyres should only be replaced with the same brand and size. I wonder if this is because its the Multispace version with extra seats and doors, that it is a special tyre for the job.
    It's a great car, and dare I say that it is NEARLY as good on the road as a BX, especially with a bit of weight in the back.
    The bloke with too many BX's

  9. #9
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    gibgib,

    can't you leave a brick on the throttle to keep the revs up to make sure the alternator is actually charging?

    If you want I can give you a contact in Guildford who can fabricate some new brackets to mount a second alternator (if that's possible).

    On tyres, the XM wears front left quickly on the outside as well. The tyre place reckons it because of roundabouts... in general you do more hard cornering to the right leading to wear on the left tyre. Sounds feasible, but not too sure about that!

    Derek

  10. #10
    Local Tyrant gibgib's Avatar
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    Funny I've tried the brick method but the little bastard knows something is on the accelerator after about 5 minutes it adjusts itself back to idle
    Now this is bad as when I do take the brick away the engine cuts out due to the new setting it has established, & this means I need a hill again
    Has this place at Guildford done any work for you before?

  11. #11
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Gibgib,

    I can't understand why this is a problem. Any autoelectrician worth a pinch should be able to fit a high output alternator... Hey that's not exactly a 'unique' car when it comes to the motor it has. If they can't fabricate some new mountings to suite they don't deserve to be in business anyway.

    My guess is the main problem is $$$$??? Alternators (especialy big ones) are expensive...

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  12. #12
    Moderator Alan S's Avatar
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    gibgib,

    Ever thought of a deep cycle battery They are capable of taking big loads for a long time and jump back quickly when needed, or alternatively if the "flat battery won't start" is the main problem, what about those battery that NRMA were handling that have the facility to start the car once the main part of the battery is flat?

    Alan S
    If it ain't broke, use a 12" shifter.....that usually does the trick!!

  13. #13
    Local Tyrant gibgib's Avatar
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    Alan there isn't a problem with capacity. The cranking battery (standard one) is quite a big one & my aux battery in the back is a truck battery (big, big bugger).
    I am using an isolator which uses 2 FETs to regulate the current from the alt, favouring the cranker first then the aux.
    Main problem is not enough current going back to store, when the distance between jobs is not great for getting some juice back in there
    I haven't had to call NRMA or Citroen Assist because of it yet as I can usually bridge the aux battery for cranking or roll start...
    I either live with it or get a bigger alternator

  14. #14
    Fellow Frogger! Paul Smith's Avatar
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    Hi Alan, Shane,

    I can vouch for the expense, but I recommend both the deep cycle battery and a big alternator. I have owned my Automatic D for nearly four years now and always had trouble with batteries going flat if you used the car for shorter journeys, particularly with the A/C and lights on.

    The standard 55A alternator on an Automatic D is just not up to the task, particularly if you let the car drop into top gear immediately as it always wants to do - you end up spending most of your time at between 1000 and 2000 rpm in town, so you simply don't get enough charge.

    When we rebuilt the engine I installed a US made Odyssey sealed unit, which cost me $300, but generally retails for over $400. It guarantees a starting current of twice that of a normal unit, plus a 3 year warranty. This made things a lot better, but still after a trip to town and back on a wet night with lights, fans, A/C and wipers the car would only just start in the morning.

    I looked at the suggested use of a BX unit, which is apparently an easy fit, but it was only 70A - not really enough gain for the trouble. So we went the whole hog and put in a 110A Mitsubishi unit - very compact, and so far absolutely wonderful - only a couple of weeks use, but I have really cold air even at idle - you can hear fans whirring loudly - the D has 4 running when the A/C is on, and the indicators even flash steadily and brightly with the headlights and the A/C on - I would recommend this to any one who has an Auto car - they are notorious for not having enough charge at idle.

    It cost over $500, but as we had the engine out to replace the gearbox, it added only a small amount to an already nasty bill! The autobox is really good though - very smooth, and kicks down very readily.

    Paul
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  15. #15
    Administrator GreenBlood's Avatar
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    Gibgib,
    I'm a little curious as to what is causing such a drain on your start battery, we have a Landie with a duel battery set-up and as Alan suggests the second battery is a deep cycle, we can run a fridge and lights for about 24 hours without touching the start battery, which is issolated until the ignition is on and always gets priority on charge. Never had a problem?

    Cheers
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  16. #16
    Local Tyrant gibgib's Avatar
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    Cranking battery can have the hazard lights & radio going for up to & over an hour. I need the hazards as I park in the most difficult situations.
    Rear battery is (at the same time) running an inverter which powers a TV, 2 cable modems, laptop, decoder & sometimes my FM radio station, GIBGIB FM 105.3
    The later has taken a back seat due to my "power" prob...
    So you can see it's a fair wack & there usually isn't enough *drivies* to put it all back in there.

  17. #17
    Moderator Alan S's Avatar
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    gibgib,

    I don't even think that a deep cycle battery is an option with that kind of useage but more of a necessity. The charge of the battery must be up and down like a yo-yo and that is exactly what they are made for. They originally were very popular with the battery operated scale model racing cars who use a charger about as gentle on a battery as droping a 1/2" iron bar across the terminals and they can handle that which is an enormous strain on any battery. They take a long time to run down but don't suffer as badly as a normal battery that gets totally flattened and then recharged. The other option of course is a generator but if hooked up to the van as a charger, don't forget that the battery has to be disconnected first so that is a drama unless of course you are using it on the auxilary battery. There are heaps of them kicking around on the second hand market that have done very little work. Of course if it doesn't have to be 12Volts, the generator eliminates the problem completely anyway

    Alan S
    If it ain't broke, use a 12" shifter.....that usually does the trick!!

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