Why do people buy Citroens?
  • Help
Results 1 to 20 of 20
  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger! sdabel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    216

    Default Why do people buy Citroens?

    The other day while I was having my hair cut one of the other customers was talking about the car she was going to buy, a (new) C3. My ears pricked up and we had a bit of a chat about it, what did I learn?

    Advertisement


    • Clearly she saw my car as one of those weird/Citroens- nothing she would ever own
    • She didn't know if it was an auto/sensodrive/manual so I don't think she was buying it for its technical qualities
    • About all she did seem sure of was that it "ran on the smell on an oily rag" and her present car was a 4WD so I guess she won't be disapointed
    • She didn't have an opinion on how the dealer had treated her, so I hope she is not disapointed if they provide the usual dealer standard of service
    • The lady in question was baby boomer age and my guess either HR or marketing management
    • So why did she choose a Citroen? I didn't get a straight answer to this but it seemed that she liked they way it looked, and perhaps it seemed a bit exotic.


    So is the typical Citroen buyer?

    regards
    sean
    _____________________
    1996 XM 2.1 TD Exclusive

  2. #2
    lee
    lee is offline
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    41

    Default

    Not sure, just guess:

    Someone want looked different

    Someone read too much Euro Auto magazine or don't read at all.

    WRC fans but didn't like Jap cars.

  3. #3
    Member C2VTR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    42

    Default

    My reasons are as follows

    • Unique here in Adelaide
    • Point of difference
    • Interesting to drive
    • Wife prefers autos i prefer manual/best of both worlds
    • We have a C2 so it's small size
    • Small Price
    That's about it, and as for the socio economic side of things, i'm in the building industry & my wife is in science

    Dan

  4. #4
    1000+ Posts TroyO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia
    Posts
    2,514

    Default

    For me it was because it was an affordable Euro, well equipped for the price and was good to drive.

    Troy.

  5. #5
    1000+ Posts HONG KONG PUGGY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Yarrabilba, Queensland
    Posts
    2,760

    Default

    Our neighbour bought her Xsara VTS a few years ago with the divorce payout. She is a 50 something uni Dr of phylisophy and wanted a car that wasn't something her husband thought she should have.
    Jane liked the look of the Cit but when she took it for a test drive she told me it was so far above the Honda and Mazdas she was used to it was laughable.

    We bought ours because Sue wanted a nice small 5 dr auto hatch and nothing Korean/Asian/Jap was going to cut it. She learnt to drive in a 505 wagon so it was all uphill from there
    2016 Renault Sport Clio Cup EDC 200



    Previous

    2001 Rx-4 Privilege
    R17TL, 1973
    R20TS x 3
    R18 GTS wagon x 2
    R10





    "When you hit the tree between the headlights thats understeer. Oversteer is when you hit the tree between the Tail Lights" - Wayne Bell

  6. #6
    Fellow Frogger! Trixie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    495

    Default

    She might well be the average C3 buyer. And quite possiby the C4 falls into that category too - well-equipped, bit more character than a lot of other things in the class, standout interior and exterior design, a nice friendly ambience. Also well marketed as a stylish, cool euro choice (whether this is true or not). The C3 is a decent little car; the 1.4 SX I drove in particular compared well to Mazda 2 and 206 for most of the driving; sure the Fiesta is a better handler and the 2 more capacious but it was torquey, quite refined, rode well - likeable.

    C4 too has a distinct feel on the road; ergonomics, interior and seat design give it that. It has load of showroom appeal of course, great practicality. And, in spite of anti-Citroen sentiment at ACP its a really nice car to drive (in 1.6 SX form at least); good refinement, great handling and a brilliant speed-hump muncher.

    C5 is presumably bought for its suspension and general refinement; and that is reason enough IMHO.

    I fear most people buy cars because they like the design and it drives better than their old one, and they are comfortable its not too wierd and so they won't be laughed at, and it won't break down too often, rather than for exceptional chassis or technological advancement. Which is presumably why the C2/3/4/5 are selling better than Citroens have for a while.
    Last edited by Trixie; 15th February 2006 at 09:47 AM.
    John

    2005 Renaultsport Clio 182 Cup - French Racing Blue
    2008 BMW 325i M-sport steptronic sedan - Alpineweiss
    2010 BMW 320d Touring Innovations - Space Grey

  7. #7
    Fellow Frogger! tlampre's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    167

    Default

    My BX is a post-separation car. Something I could never have had during my marriage. Iíve always liked cars of the 1980ís, it was a time of turmoil in the industry worldwide where makers were trying out all sorts of new ideas. (If anyone had said during the 70ís that Holdens would be rebadging Jap crap in another 10 years they would have been thrown out of the pub). It was a decade of choice. And 80's cars are still technologically accessible for the backyarder.


    I enjoyed working on cars with my Dad when I grew up and inherited his insatiable urge to tinker. I also like technical innovation, admire the work of Bertone and needed a comfortable, economical car for long trips.

    Only their reputation for reliability put me off, but I kept seeing the BXís on the websites and finally decided to take one for a drive. That was all it took.

  8. #8
    Fellow Frogger! Ren25's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    299

    Default

    Q. Where do you buy a low milage 10 yr old car for less than 7 grand that's not a Korean POS, or just a general POS?
    A. Buy a Xantia
    Armageddon was yesterday
    Today we have a problem


    2000 406 Hdi X 3
    2003 307 Hdi

  9. #9
    Fellow Frogger! chris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Sydney/Marsfield
    Posts
    376

    Default

    I'll see that Q and raise you a "Where do you buy a car that rides like a limo, handles like it's on rails, will carry four adults including their knees and elbows, cover 1000km in a day without batting an eyelid, generally give the impression of being both bulletproof and dead cool, all for less than some people spend on a set of speakers?"

    A 70s Citroen

    Oh, and you can can change a tyre in about 2 minutes flat, even when the car is fully loaded, they had collapsing steering columns and crumple zones before most manufacturers would admit that their cars even crashed, the engines last forever, the seats are excellent, and (should the need arise) you can steer and brake with one front wheel missing.

    One-eyed, me?

    Chris
    GS 1220 break. Beige cars go faster

  10. #10
    Fellow Frogger!
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    169

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by chris
    and (should the need arise) you can steer and brake with one front wheel missing.
    So you've tried this have you.......or are you just propogating the myth...

    A back wheel, yes, a front wheel no.....the centre of gravity is too far forward to allow stability with a front wheel missing, especially on a GS or CX both of which are very front biased.

    And then there is the teeny-tiny problem of no forward drive due to the diff allowing one wheel hub to spin uselessly...

    If you had two flat front tyres you'd transfer a rear wheel to the front. (And yes I HAVE tried driving a GS with one rear wheel missing )

    Regards,
    Simon
    1998 Xantia Mk2 V6 Auto Exclusive

  11. #11
    Fellow Frogger! chris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Sydney/Marsfield
    Posts
    376

    Default

    Simon old son, the French are calling you a liar:

    http://137.111.107.167/~chris/commercial2.avi

    There's also someone on the GS Yahoo list who did a one-front-wheel stop from motorway speeds after one front wheel fell off! Not sure who did up the wheelnuts

    Not something I'd rush out to try, but I'm assured it's possible, at least for long enough to save your life.

    Chris
    GS 1220 break. Beige cars go faster

  12. #12
    Fellow Frogger!
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    169

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by chris
    Simon old son, the French are calling you a liar:

    http://137.111.107.167/~chris/commercial2.avi

    There's also someone on the GS Yahoo list who did a one-front-wheel stop from motorway speeds after one front wheel fell off! Not sure who did up the wheelnuts

    Not something I'd rush out to try, but I'm assured it's possible, at least for long enough to save your life.

    Chris
    Hi Chris,

    I've seen that video before...

    Thats a tyre BLOWOUT at the front, not the wheel removed entirely.... a slightly different situation you must agree (you did specifically say "one front wheel missing")

    Theres a better quality version of that video at this site:

    http://81.68.229.29/

    As well as a video showing a GS driving with a rear wheel missing entirely.

    Yes, a flat tyre is handled very well by the GS, so well in fact that most drivers will not notice a punctured rear tyre at all, while a flat tyre at the front still renders the car quite controllable.

    I've run over a board with a nail (presumably) on my GS many moons ago and punctured the rear tyre and only felt a slight bump, couldn't tell anything wrong with the handling or ride, so kept going another Kilometre, and by the time I found somewhere safe to stop the rear tyre was shredded No noticeable affect on the driving.

    As for a wheel coming off the front after you're already driving, I have no doubt that you would be able to come to a controllable stop, but again thats different to driving semi-normally with the wheel missing, which was your implication.

    Regards,
    Simon
    1998 Xantia Mk2 V6 Auto Exclusive

  13. #13
    Fellow Frogger!
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    monbulk
    Posts
    658

    Default Why Citroen?

    For more than 30 years of driving I have always driven a French car. Only last year did we buy our first Citroen - a Xsara. Now I know that some here at AF would say it's not a real Citroen. Maybe so, but friends who ride in it are consistently impressed by its handling, performance and comfort. They chatter positively about its superiority to other cars in its class. The styling and interior IMHO is better than the Pug.
    For us then its a bloody good and practical car. Thats why we bought it. It impressed us (and our friends) by maintaining those French qualities that I have sought for those 30 odd years.
    Now that I have spent time on AF, the Cit forum would have to be the most "interesting" and I read it daily. So much so that our 405 and 505 S/W are likely to make way for a "real" Cit.
    A C5 is out of our budget at the moment. (maybe the C6 will depress values a bit?) So I guess that makes it a late model Xantia manual.
    But at my house that makes me Robinson Crusoe. Others want a 406 (but the Coupe is parallel to the C5 in $ value). A Laguna is on the agenda too.
    Whatever and whenever it will be FRENCH.

  14. #14
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Ballarat,Vic,Aust.
    Posts
    16,755

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mandrake
    So you've tried this have you.......or are you just propogating the myth...

    A back wheel, yes, a front wheel no.....the centre of gravity is too far forward to allow stability with a front wheel missing, especially on a GS or CX both of which are very front biased.

    And then there is the teeny-tiny problem of no forward drive due to the diff allowing one wheel hub to spin uselessly...

    If you had two flat front tyres you'd transfer a rear wheel to the front. (And yes I HAVE tried driving a GS with one rear wheel missing )

    Regards,
    Simon
    Myth

    It's no myth, ask fellow member Roger.... His '59 DS19 lost a front wheel at highway speeds. Ground hell out of the lower ball joint apparantly, however it steered straight, and pulled up without an issue. He simply had to hike into the paddocks to find his wheel, then put the car on 'high' to refit it

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    'Cit' homepage:
    Citroen Workshop
    Proper cars--
    '85 Series II CX2500 GTi Turbo I
    '63 ID19 http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/citro%EBn-forum/90325-best-project-car-you-have-ever-seen.html
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas (last looked at ... about 15years ago)
    '78 GS1220 pallas
    '92 Range Rover Classic ... 5spd manual.

    Yay ... No Slugomatics


    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual

  15. #15
    1000+ Posts Uga Boga's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    1,057

    Default

    Why drive French?

    1. Unique.
    2. Innovative.
    3. Comfort.
    4. They know how to design interiors and exteriors.
    5. Rattles. They keep me company
    407 3.0L Exclusive (2007)

    Expert 2.0L (2009)

    Laguna 2.0L dCi (2007)

  16. #16
    BVH Roger Wilkinson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Warrnambool
    Posts
    2,413

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleChevron
    Myth

    It's no myth, ask fellow member Roger.... His '59 DS19 lost a front wheel at highway speeds. Ground hell out of the lower ball joint apparantly, however it steered straight, and pulled up without an issue. He simply had to hike into the paddocks to find his wheel, then put the car on 'high' to refit it

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    Trust me, it's no myth. A couple of years ago I was driving my "new" 1959 DS19 home from up north down the Newell. I obeyed the speed limit sign and slowed to 80km/h for the railway crossing-bend-intersection conglomeration near Tomingley (south of Dubbo). What should appear ahead and to my right than the right front wheel of my car! I felt nothing. I backed off the throttle. The wheel sailed off into the bush on the other side of the road. Luckily there were no oncoming vehicles. I applied the brakes gently and the front right corner of the car sank. The steering stayed completely neutral, it didn't pull to the side at all. I heard a horrible scraping sound. The car pulled up smoothly, doing what I told it to do the whole time. At the last it stopped with a bit of a shudder. I got out and saw that the bottom ball joint bolt thread and nut had been completely worn away and the bitumen had just started grinding away on the lower arm. The family in a Jap 4 wheel drive behind me pulled in to help. They were aghast at what happened but impressed with the fact that I had complete control of the vehicle the whole time. OK, I couldn't have accelerated because of the diff, but I was able to come to a controlled and fairly smooth stop. After a quick wander in the bush I found the wheel. Fortunately the hubcaps weren't mounted at the time. Now, how to get the wheel back on again? I put the suspension on high. With a bit of scraping away of the gravel on the road shoulder I managed to get the jack stand on the knob at its shortest setting. I lowered the suspension and up came the hub. A bit more scraping and I could fit the wheel on. Tightened up the wheel nut (properly this time) and I was away. The family in the Jap 4wd just could not believe it.

    Try doing that in aything else.

    I have also had a front left tyre blow out at 100 km/h in a D Super. Again I felt nothing and it was only the funny noise that alerted me.

    These are truly extraordinary cars.

    Roger

  17. #17
    Good Sport danielsydney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    NSW
    Posts
    4,918

    Default

    Why drive French?

    1. Unique.
    2. Innovative.
    3. Comfort.
    4. They know how to design interiors and exteriors.
    5. Rattles. They keep me company
    Here here. I like to be different also.

  18. #18
    Ashtray Polisher donat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    1,475

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by danielsydney
    Here here. I like to be different also.

    So what do you French drive to be different? A Skoda?

    I drive them because they're comfortable and its easy to find your car in a car-park.
    1972 SM
    1989 BX 16 Valve

  19. #19
    SMP addict pugjet's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Enruoblem
    Posts
    2,098

    Default

    parents roginally purchased a citroen xsara (which i now own and drive) because they were after a euro car that was reasonably priced and nicely specced, and obviously looks werent a priority .

    no other car, at the time, was even competitive 'cept for a 306 xt and xsi, but my oldman didnt like the "hatchback" look, and preferred the obviously classy proton persona look.

    its given them - and me - fairly maintenance free motoring with a non-descript flavour. the best thing about the xsara is that at least nobody tries to bail you up at the lights. and well some older folk have recognised the badge and think its as expensive as a merc, and it has that "quirky" upsy downsy suspension .

    if i ever own another citroen itd have to be a an sm or bx 16v. none of that ghey cx turbs for me.
    current frogs :
    '94 s3 alpine 205GTi

    daily ding magnet: '98 1.8 16v citroen xsara


    previous frogs:

    88 S1 205GTi
    '95 306S16


    gimme corners. . .


  20. #20
    jmn
    jmn is offline
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Mangerton NSW
    Posts
    106

    Default

    Re "myth"

    I think it was about April last year when I was driving back from Bargo to Wollongong after an astronomical observing night. Doing about 100-110 on the motorway - suddenly...floppity flop! Didn't twig to it right off as the C5 continued to track straight and true.

    However, judgement borne of 40+ years of driving suggested slow down and inspection ASAP. Drove off at the Wollongong exit, stopped under the overpass lighting and got out for a squizz. Sure enough, near-side front tyre flat as the proverbial pancake.

    Not happy Jan! I had a lot of gear in the boot which all had to come out and then there was the dreaded routine with an unfamiliar kit of tools to deal with.

    Compared to conventional cars, the Cit continued with its "wound" as if normal. This could be a disadvantage if the condition goes undiagnosed but that's how it was.

    Viva la Cit!!

    jmn

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •