Were is CX Fuel Guage Sender?
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  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Default Were is CX Fuel Guage Sender?

    My sons CX ran out of fuel again and I must fix the fuel guage because it only works somtimes
    The sender in the tank is the first thing I will try.
    A mate told me that if I short the wire that goes to the sender the guage will show full thus ruling out the sender as the culprit, then I must look elswere.
    The sender I am hoping is in the floor of the boot but I do not want to pull up the soundproofing if I do not have to as it is stuck to the floor pretty well and will be a bas..... fatherless child if the sender is located elsewere.

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    cooch

  2. #2
    CitroŽn, what else? smiffy1071's Avatar
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    Sorry mate, but yes you do have to pull up the carpet in the boot.
    When you do, you will see 1 or 2 large round plastic plugs
    (depends on model) in the steel floor of the boot. Pull these up to expose either the fuel pick up, or the sender. It might have a combined unit....
    again, this depends on model. john s
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  3. #3
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    If you own a later CX you can simply lift the boot mat and pry up the metal cuttout.

    If you own an aussie CX .... You have no inspection hole in the boot so must drop the tank (which isn't actually a big deal, it's quite simple as there is only two straps to unbolt).

    If it makes you feel better check the boot floor... Who know you may have got lucky (I never have).

    I have never been really concerned about the guage. The petrol light is a seperate guage and will still work when you only have a few litres left.

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  4. #4
    1000+ Posts George 1/8th's Avatar
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    Hi Cooch, I'd be pretty darn careful about shorting any wire that goes into any petrol tank....in case you make a spark....in the tank!!! Not a good idea. You could try testing the guage in the dash...no petrol there to blow up in your face....
    It might be a good idea to fit a new sender unit in the tank. In my CX , you just undo one bolt to lower the tank...and there you have access to the top of it. It's a good excuse to check the condition of all the rubber hoses too while you are there....there is the filler hose, the breather hoses and the fuel lines...all of which could have deteriorated with time....well worth checking.
    It's a really good idea to do this when the tank is empty or near empty....that way it's a lot lighter to lift it and hold it when re-fitting the bolt that holds it all up.
    Cheers....George 1/8th.

  5. #5
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Quote Originally Posted by George 1/8th
    Hi Cooch, I'd be pretty darn careful about shorting any wire that goes into any petrol tank....in case you make a spark....in the tank!!! Not a good idea. You could try testing the guage in the dash...no petrol there to blow up in your face....
    It might be a good idea to fit a new sender unit in the tank. In my CX , you just undo one bolt to lower the tank...and there you have access to the top of it. It's a good excuse to check the condition of all the rubber hoses too while you are there....there is the filler hose, the breather hoses and the fuel lines...all of which could have deteriorated with time....well worth checking.
    It's a really good idea to do this when the tank is empty or near empty....that way it's a lot lighter to lift it and hold it when re-fitting the bolt that holds it all up.
    Cheers....George 1/8th.
    Thanks Froggers

    I will have a look in the boot on the weekend if the temperature is under 40 degrees. George's idea of droping the tank sounds good as it only has about a litre of mower fuel in it at the moment, I might even find where the pesky fuel smell is coming from. The Haymes bible does'nt even mention the removal, location or anything to do with the tank.

    So wish me well in my endevours and I'll let you know how I get on.

    Low fuel warning light?


    Cooch

  6. #6
    Too many posts! JohnW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cooch Goodwin
    Thanks Froggers

    I will have a look in the boot on the weekend if the temperature is under 40 degrees. George's idea of droping the tank sounds good as it only has about a litre of mower fuel in it at the moment, I might even find where the pesky fuel smell is coming from. The Haymes bible does'nt even mention the removal, location or anything to do with the tank.

    So wish me well in my endevours and I'll let you know how I get on.

    Low fuel warning light?


    Cooch
    The petrol smell was driving me mad in my CX and there are a couple of threads on the subject. I traced mine eventually to the gasket between the original filler cap base and the screw on base for the locking cap, in parallel with a leaking gasket on the lockable cap itself. I replaced the gasket (2-3 mm rubberised cork) and bought a new locking cap from Supercheap (it said it was for an Alfa Romeo among other things, but didn't mention Citroen - there's quite a range of these things).

    Good luck with it.
    JohnW

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  7. #7
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnW
    The petrol smell was driving me mad in my CX and there are a couple of threads on the subject. I traced mine eventually to the gasket between the original filler cap base and the screw on base for the locking cap, in parallel with a leaking gasket on the lockable cap itself. I replaced the gasket (2-3 mm rubberised cork) and bought a new locking cap from Supercheap (it said it was for an Alfa Romeo among other things, but didn't mention Citroen - there's quite a range of these things).

    Good luck with it.
    Well its still too hot in the shed to work without a lot of liquid replacement.

    I did remove the carpet & insulation from the boot though, there is a couple of holes in it but the metal plates that cover them seem to be glued in. A job also for cooler weather.

    The Hi Lux that is over the pit (never work under without one, even a peek) will soon be outa here (a couple of months) and work can begin.


    Cooch

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