CX thermostat housing
  • Help
Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    sydney
    Posts
    77

    Default CX thermostat housing

    i have been tinkering around with my recently purchased CX c-matics cooling system ie flushing it out in my garage making an awful mess etc. I was convinced that the source of the rusty discolouration of the coolant was from a rusted out transmission fluid cooler. So on Sunday morning I decided to replace it with one in good condition from a car that I wrecked. The job took longer than I thought such that we arrived at the French car day in Sydney at 3.45! But there were still some friendly folk there to chat to.
    Anyway still not happy with the colour of the coolant today I took the car to a radiator place and asked him to flush it out for me. As he insisted upon cash as payment I insisted upon another few goes until what was coming out was clearer. He expressed his dislike of Citroens, Volvos & Mercs but I stood my ground and said I aint selling the car and it has to run properly. He thought that it had too many hoses!

    Whilst I know that the thermostat is opening and that the fans are coming on tonight I decided that I would take the thermostat out and test it in the kitchen -
    but damn it the first bolt that I tried to remove snapped.
    I am going to leave it alone but lube up the other 2 before attempting to to take off the housing. So often a little tinker leads to another problem - at least with me! but I know it has to be done so that I am sure that the cooling system is working properly.

    I did notice though that the heater was definetly working better after todays flushing.
    This car has been in storage and possibly explains the build up.

    Advertisement

  2. #2
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Ballarat,Vic,Aust.
    Posts
    16,756

    Default

    Not unusual at all. Infact I'm surprised you didn't sheer all of them

    I pulled the water pump off of mine to extract the bolts. However if you heat the area with a little butane torch to expand the alloy you will probaby find the stud will unscrew with some vice grips.

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    'Cit' homepage:
    Citroen Workshop
    Proper cars--
    '85 Series II CX2500 GTi Turbo I
    '63 ID19 http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/citro%EBn-forum/90325-best-project-car-you-have-ever-seen.html
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas (last looked at ... about 15years ago)
    '78 GS1220 pallas
    '92 Range Rover Classic ... 5spd manual.

    Yay ... No Slugomatics


    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual

  3. #3
    Fellow Frogger!
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Cootamundra Australia
    Posts
    209

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleChevron
    Not unusual at all. Infact I'm surprised you didn't sheer all of them

    I pulled the water pump off of mine to extract the bolts. However if you heat the area with a little butane torch to expand the alloy you will probaby find the stud will unscrew with some vice grips.

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    Yep Shane, even without the heat they often come out. My Q is do you replace the bolts with the same, do you use coppercoat or do you use a higher corrosion resistant bolt?

    Cooch

  4. #4
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Ballarat,Vic,Aust.
    Posts
    16,756

    Default

    Copper, alloy and metal don't like each other, so I wouldn't use copper grease... There's an alloy paste you can use I've heard. Me ?? I just put some more bolts back in.

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    'Cit' homepage:
    Citroen Workshop
    Proper cars--
    '85 Series II CX2500 GTi Turbo I
    '63 ID19 http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/showthread.php?t=90325
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas (last looked at ... about 15years ago)
    '78 GS1220 pallas
    '92 Range Rover Classic ... 5spd manual.

    Yay ... No Slugomatics


    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual

  5. #5
    CitroŽn, what else? smiffy1071's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Bristol/England!
    Posts
    1,486

    Default

    On nuts and bolts that are known to corrode, or snap when you try to remove them, it might be an idea to use stainless steel bolts instead.
    I'm sure they can't be that expensive? john s
    2005 C5 2.0 VTR Hdi 138, 1986 Kawasaki GPz 750G2

  6. #6
    Moderator Alan S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    8,923

    Default

    I have a 30 year old 70HP outboard that I can still get most of the bolts that I've ever had out (ie) leg, water pump, thermostat etc because when I remove them, I always soak firstly in WD (Turps or kero = same thing) then use some penetrene followed by ordinary oil usually start one weekend and remove the next, and upon reassembly, coat with grease including head and any part of the thread either male or female that is still exposed. If you are or know anyone whose a dab hand with a welder, get the broken bit just stuck back on with a MIG and wind the thread out when it's almost cool.
    The rusty coolant is probably coming from inside the heater and I doubt you're out of the woods with it yet.
    Remove the three way plastic fitting that diverts water to the matrix and the other hose that has a connection close by the 3 way. (We call the 3 way connector "the carrot" and if you want to know why, just use any pressure whatsoever when removing; brittle as all hell) I have back flushed these several ways; one is by having the hose in one end and blowing compressed air up the other, another is to alternate the hose or air from one direction, then the other until it loosens. Water should flow almost impeded through these connections and if it either won't flow or only trickles, I have even in desperation, carefully used a piece of fencing wire, slid up until the obstruction is felt, wriggled around with the hose poked in from the other direction, water on, until it has dribbled and then let go.
    When it lets go, there is often a ball of rust and gunk best described as looking like a dog turd that will fall out. Flush for a bit longer once this comes out, then reconnect and use a good coolant in future.
    If you have this common blockage in there, you will never get clean coolant until it's been shifted.


    Alan S
    If it ain't broke, use a 12" shifter.....that usually does the trick!!

  7. #7
    Fellow Frogger! chris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Sydney/Marsfield
    Posts
    376

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleChevron
    Me ?? I just put some more bolts back in.
    Be fun taking them out again next time, won't it? You can buy a Moly anit-seize paste from Repco if you're worried about the copper.

    The only car I've ever worked on that came apart easily had been owned by an engineer (of the fitting and welding type) who put anti-sieze on everything. BEAUTIFUL. Shame we were wrecking it for the engine

    Chris
    GS 1220 break. Beige cars go faster

  8. #8
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Ballarat,Vic,Aust.
    Posts
    16,756

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by chris
    Be fun taking them out again next time, won't it? You can buy a Moly anit-seize paste from Repco if you're worried about the copper.

    The only car I've ever worked on that came apart easily had been owned by an engineer (of the fitting and welding type) who put anti-sieze on everything. BEAUTIFUL. Shame we were wrecking it for the engine

    Chris
    Like most things I do on these cars, once I have done it the first time for my ownership, I have no problems in the future (probably because I use decent coolant and maintain the cars). Much like rounded sump plugs, horenoudly tight oil filters, gearbox drain plugs that need to be "chiseled" to loosen, spheres that were obviously done up by a 150kg giant with the strength and tools to match....

    Once I've changed them for the first time, all I usually need is a clean rubber glove on for traction and I can undo the filtres/spheres with my bare hands etc....

    Alan, you guys have got to use your heaters more up there !!! I've never experianced that rust problem you speak of

    seeya,
    Shane L
    'Cit' homepage:
    Citroen Workshop
    Proper cars--
    '85 Series II CX2500 GTi Turbo I
    '63 ID19 http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/showthread.php?t=90325
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas (last looked at ... about 15years ago)
    '78 GS1220 pallas
    '92 Range Rover Classic ... 5spd manual.

    Yay ... No Slugomatics


    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual

  9. #9
    CitroŽn, what else? smiffy1071's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Bristol/England!
    Posts
    1,486

    Default

    Of course decent quality anti-freeze helps. I know that freezing in Australia is not common, but anti-freeze also contains a corrosion inhibitor.
    Alternativly, just fill with dexron III
    2005 C5 2.0 VTR Hdi 138, 1986 Kawasaki GPz 750G2

  10. #10
    Moderator Alan S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    8,923

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleChevron

    Alan, you guys have got to use your heaters more up there !!! I've never experianced that rust problem you speak of

    seeya,
    Shane L
    Think about it; it's through LACK of use that they get the build up. If they were being used constantly I doubt the problem would have arisn. This car has been laid up so naturally it has the build up.
    The Dexron3 throwaway line should be ignored too before someone takes it serious and gets into some real strife.


    Alan S
    If it ain't broke, use a 12" shifter.....that usually does the trick!!

  11. #11
    CitroŽn, what else? smiffy1071's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Bristol/England!
    Posts
    1,486

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan S
    Think about it; it's through LACK of use that they get the build up. If they were being used constantly I doubt the problem would have arisn. This car has been laid up so naturally it has the build up.
    The Dexron3 throwaway line should be ignored too before someone takes it serious and gets into some real strife.


    Alan S
    Alan, that WAS a joke, a bad one perhaps, but still a joke! john s
    2005 C5 2.0 VTR Hdi 138, 1986 Kawasaki GPz 750G2

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    sydney
    Posts
    77

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by smiffy1071
    Alan, that WAS a joke, a bad one perhaps, but still a joke! john s
    thanks to all for that advice - I have taken it on board (except the Dexron 111 bit - alas I don't have any use for it in my little workshop - mind you I've got plenty of other cans of this and that around) I am going to 'treat' the remaining 2 bolts on the thermostat housing before I take them off.
    Alan when the radiator guy flushed up thru the heater hose a lot of gunk did come out initially and then did run pretty clear. Also I just took the car for a good run down the F6 here in southern Sydney (towards Wollongong - heater and fan on full stopping to check that it was'nt bubbling along the way) and there was no prob. Let it cool a bit when I got home and checked the contents of the overflow tank - looked pretty clear - whereas before I started on it the colour was about the same brown as my Dad's dam water where we catch yabbies! (for the benefit of our English corrospondent a yabbie is an Ozzie prawn that happily lives in fresh to muddy dam water). For the time being I am going to tidy up my workshop a bit - have a little break from tinkering- and then get back to it.
    I am learning along the way. But given that this car has been in storage I feel that I need to check things

  13. #13
    Fellow Frogger!
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Cootamundra Australia
    Posts
    209

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by citx2
    thanks to all for that advice - I have taken it on board (except the Dexron 111 bit - alas I don't have any use for it in my little workshop - mind you I've got plenty of other cans of this and that around) I am going to 'treat' the remaining 2 bolts on the thermostat housing before I take them off.
    Alan when the radiator guy flushed up thru the heater hose a lot of gunk did come out initially and then did run pretty clear. Also I just took the car for a good run down the F6 here in southern Sydney (towards Wollongong - heater and fan on full stopping to check that it was'nt bubbling along the way) and there was no prob. Let it cool a bit when I got home and checked the contents of the overflow tank - looked pretty clear - whereas before I started on it the colour was about the same brown as my Dad's dam water where we catch yabbies! (for the benefit of our English corrospondent a yabbie is an Ozzie prawn that happily lives in fresh to muddy dam water). For the time being I am going to tidy up my workshop a bit - have a little break from tinkering- and then get back to it.
    I am learning along the way. But given that this car has been in storage I feel that I need to check things
    We call them craybobs

    cooch

  14. #14
    Fellow Frogger! Ren25's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    299

    Default

    Stainless bolts are not a solution where alloy is in the mix. Back in the days when I was a grotty yachty we used to use a product called "Duralac" on all stainless fittings onto alloy (masts etc) to stop galvanic corrosion. I have warned also about copper based anti-seize in alloy for the same reason ie galvanic corrosion), a moly or aluminium based equivalent would be the go. Alloy is very touchy stuff and lurks down towards the bottom of the galvanic scale whereas stainless and copper are a long walk, up near the top.
    Cheers
    Mike
    Armageddon was yesterday
    Today we have a problem


    2000 406 Hdi X 3
    2003 307 Hdi

  15. #15
    Member cabbage tree's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    auckland new zealand
    Posts
    81

    Default

    "(for the benefit of our English corrospondent a yabbie is an Ozzie prawn that happily lives in fresh to muddy dam water). For the time being I am going to tidy up my workshop a bit - have a little break from tinkering- and then get back to it.
    I am learning along the way. But given that this car has been in storage I feel that I need to check things"


    "We call them craybobs"

    "We call them 'Koura' down here in the Land of the Long White Cloud."

  16. #16
    CitroŽn, what else? smiffy1071's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Bristol/England!
    Posts
    1,486

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cabbage tree
    "(for the benefit of our English corrospondent a yabbie is an Ozzie prawn that happily lives in fresh to muddy dam water). For the time being I am going to tidy up my workshop a bit - have a little break from tinkering- and then get back to it.
    I am learning along the way. But given that this car has been in storage I feel that I need to check things"


    "We call them craybobs"

    "We call them 'Koura' down here in the Land of the Long White Cloud."
    That's ok mate, I have my mate from sydney staying with me at the moment, and he can do the trasnslations! john s
    2005 C5 2.0 VTR Hdi 138, 1986 Kawasaki GPz 750G2

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •