What tyre pressures do you run in your DS?
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Thread: What tyre pressures do you run in your DS?

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    Thank God for my Hydroen harrisson_citroen's Avatar
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    Default What tyre pressures do you run in your DS?

    I definitely know what they're meant to be.
    But wondering what the majority here use on their cars.
    It seems every tyre shop nowadays pumps every tyre to 38 psi. I tried it in the C5 , and to my surprise, it's actually still comfortable.
    Would the DS also benefit from higher pressures in the "lookalike" michelin/retro nankang?

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    I think running higher Tyre pressures on the front tyres will increase the weight of the steering feel. I run with the pressures recommended by Longstone Tyres.
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    Quote Originally Posted by gsowner84 View Post
    I think running higher Tyre pressures on the front tyres will increase the weight of the steering feel. I run with the pressures recommended by Longstone Tyres.
    I disagree with that statement. I looked in the DS21 handbook which suggests 27 PSI front and rear. ( size 185X380 mm tyres ... fitted front and rear on export cars ).
    I believe a higher pressure 32 to 34 will give sharper steering response and be a little lighter at parking speeds.
    Back in the days of ID 19s ( on 165X400 Michelin X Stop pattern ) the recommended pressure was only 24 front and 20 rear which resulted in many "you've got a flat tyre Mister" comments....and huge biceps....but of course no power assistance. While CXs will regularly run out of steering assistance a DS with less than optimum accumulator performance will run out too, especially at parking speeds.
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    Quote Originally Posted by fritzelhund View Post
    I disagree with that statement. I looked in the DS21 handbook which suggests 27 PSI front and rear. ( size 185X380 mm tyres ... fitted front and rear on export cars ).
    I believe a higher pressure 32 to 34 will give sharper steering response and be a little lighter at parking speeds.
    Back in the days of ID 19s ( on 165X400 Michelin X Stop pattern ) the recommended pressure was only 24 front and 20 rear which resulted in many "you've got a flat tyre Mister" comments....and huge biceps....but of course no power assistance. While CXs will regularly run out of steering assistance a DS with less than optimum accumulator performance will run out too, especially at parking speeds.
    Yes , I am running the front at 34 at the moment, it seems to give a good compromise between steering lightness and comfort. Although I know it is a fair bit higher than recommended.....
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    Quote Originally Posted by fritzelhund View Post
    I disagree with that statement. I looked in the DS21 handbook which suggests 27 PSI front and rear. ( size 185X380 mm tyres ... fitted front and rear on export cars ).
    I believe a higher pressure 32 to 34 will give sharper steering response and be a little lighter at parking speeds.
    Back in the days of ID 19s ( on 165X400 Michelin X Stop pattern ) the recommended pressure was only 24 front and 20 rear which resulted in many "you've got a flat tyre Mister" comments....and huge biceps....but of course no power assistance. While CXs will regularly run out of steering assistance a DS with less than optimum accumulator performance will run out too, especially at parking speeds.
    I am more than happy to be corrected on this. I have only had a D for about two years. Be great to hear about what other drivers use as ideal Tyre pressures.
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    Four comments:

    First, it is correct that higher front pressures will result in lighter steering effort owing to a smaller contact patch to squirm around.

    Second, just upping front pressures will change the handling balance (less understeer, more eager turn in, greater tendency to lift-off oversteer).

    Third, the faux-XVS is structurally different to Xas or XVS Michelins. Differently structured tyres have different handling balances even if on the same pressures & some front-rear pressure differential playing around is in order to get the balance one desires if fitting a different tyre type. The point is more pronounced if the decision has been made to move from poor tyre types (Xas, XVS, faux-XVS) to superior ones like 195/65-15 Continental PremiumContact5 tyres.

    Fourth, most manufacturer recommendations bias tyre pressures towards comfort & towards an understeering handling balance (safer for poor drivers). Thus a usual recommendation is to up pressures absolutely & up the fronts relatively.

    cheers! Peter
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