Tool size for working on DS
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Thread: Tool size for working on DS

  1. #1
    Tadpole
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    Default Tool size for working on DS

    Hi all,

    I am SLOWLY dismantling my 1968 ID for restoration.

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    I have metric spaners and sockets but they seem to be slightly too loose on the nuts and bolts risking damage to them. This is my first time doing anything like this. What am I missing?
    I was told it was metric.
    Cheers
    John

  2. #2
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    With a few exceptions, the bolts are either 9 or 11mm unless someone has gone through and replaced a lot of them. They should all be metric but again, it depends whoís been there before.

    The majority of flare nuts are 9mm however the output from the pump is 12mm. A set of flare but spanners is highly recommended to avoid damaging the flarenuts. Supercheap auto has a set with the appropriate sizes for about $20

    Hang onto any nuts and bolts you take off as Citroen had a habit of using standard sizes with obscure thread pitches. For instance the pump body uses hard to get M9 with a 1mm thread pitch.

  3. #3
    Fellow Frogger
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    If it was a later car there would be lots of 8 and 10 mm, but slightly older cars have large heads on many nuts and bolts and some threads have a different pitch. For example, older boot hinges have thicker nuts and an odd thread that escapes me at the moment. A decent collection of metric sockets and spanners should be fine. If the tools feel a little loose, are they the sort that grab the flats and not the corners, for example Metrinch or, less obviously, something like Snap-On's Flankdrive?

    Screw heads are almost exclusively NOT Philips, but Posidriv, so get yourself a set of those screwdrivers or use bits marked PZ1, PZ2, .... and note the extra small cross on the heads. Using a Philips head on a Posidriv head causes damage.

  4. #4
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    Thanks for advice, so far I have been concentrating on doors, glass, window guides/rails, winding mechanism, etc.

    The bolt in the floor holding the seat belt is proving especially stubborn and again not matching the size well. I might take some of the odd sized nuts to someone with all the different spaners and find out what they are.

  5. #5
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    The sockets and spaners are just regular, not flank drive.

    For example the 4 bolts holding the window regulator to the inside of the door are too loose in a 8mm spaner and wonít fit 7mm spaner. 7.5 would probably be spot on.

    Perhaps I just need spaners in increments of half millimeters, if they exist?

  6. #6
    1000+ Posts FIVEDOOR's Avatar
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    I assume your tools are quality tools? I have seen the odd cheap spanner that was not acurately manufactured.
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  7. #7
    Fellow Frogger! badabec's Avatar
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    Hello, all the above plus if you can, always use ring spanners rather than open ended. The open ended tend to spread. There is never enough room, so if buying sockets, go for 1/4" drive.

    And don't forget to buy a magnet on a stick, Stahwille do a good one, as do most tool suppliers.

  8. #8
    BVH Roger Wilkinson's Avatar
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    The M5 bolts on your car have 8mm heads and 0.8mm thread pitch.

    The M7 bolts on your car have 11mm heads and 1.0mm thread pitch.

    I cannot think of any 10mm nuts or bolt heads on your car (only on earlier cars).

    The only 9mm hexes I can think of on your car are hydraulic unions.

    You do not need 1/2mm sizes. Few exist, and only in small sizes. The largest I can think of is 5.5mm for some 3mm threads.

    Perhaps some of the nuts and bolt heads on your car are worn.

    I use predominantly Stahlwille tools. I know no tools of higher quality. They are light, think, strong, accurately made and fit well in my hand.

    Most manufacturers of high quality tools have some form of flank drive these days, including Stahlwille. But I have some older Stahlwille tools without it and they work just as well.

    6 point sockets grip tighter than 12 point sockets, but if a hex has been damaged sometimes a 6 point won't fit on it and you have to use a 12 point.

    Ring spanners grip tighter than open end spanners. For hydraulic unions, flare nut spanners grip tighter than open end spanners. The exception to that is spanners with flare nut one end and open end the other end. In there, the open end is at least half as thick again as a normal open end and thus less likely to spread. I have a set of Snap-on spanners like that in Metric sizes and they are good for working on hexes at funny angles.

    Have a chat to Buttercup Bob at Carroll Gap. He is just down the road from you and knows a lot about Dees and engineering.

    Roger

  9. #9
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Buy yourself a small 1/4" socket set with single hex sockets. It doesn't need to be expensive. eg:




    see all the sockets are single hex, so they grab by the flats, not the corners. Pick the socket set that has no "recess" on the ends of the socket. If there is a 1mm recess at the end of the socket before you hit the bit that holds the nut/bolt, it will be more likely to round of bolts/nuts. Or you will need run the socket over a bench grinder and knock 1mm off the tip of it (if that makes sense).

    https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/STANLEY-...b99d22ecd16b97

    I use 1/4" and 3/8ths for most stuff on cars. The bigger heavier tools are nearly always to cumbersome to use in a lot of spots.

    seeya,
    Shane L.
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  10. #10
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    The brands are Eurotech and Kingchrome which I think are ok.

  11. #11
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    Thanks Roger,

    I did initially gain advice from Bob, before I noticed this issue. Will investigate further😀

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    I've never been in the shop, so this is not from experience, but I noticed that Bearcon in Tamworth are resellers for several of the better tool manufactturers, including $tahlwille. In my experience the Taiwan spanner and socket makers offer very good quality for much less.

  13. #13
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    Nothing like the Aldi $25 1/4" drive set (I think it was $25 as I got 2 of them, one for each daily drive.) All inclusive including the pozi drive bits (in addition to all the others).

    Keep a look out for it, it is very good quality and should you have a problem, the Aldi staff won't argue with you should there be a warranty claim.

    IMG_4921_1.jpg

    Also, good advice from Shane, do not hesitate to modify your tools as required. I have certainly ground down some sockets to ensure greater grip as required but not holus bolus. Another important bit of advice is that at all times irrespective of what tool / bit it is ensure that it sits perpendicular to the fixing (screw, bolt, not) and you rotate 90 degrees to that perpendicular axis. And as you found out, you need the correct socket bit etc tool.

    Just the other day when I was at the wreckers removing the C5 front fender, there was this guy trying to remove an alternator from a Mercedes W202. He had a good set of gear including an impact gun.

    Despite the problems I was having I could not help noticing his frustration of trying to undo this bolt, a 55 torx male head with a 60 torx socket! He was lucky that I had a hammer (I don't normally carry a hammer but was required for the fender removal) that I was able to force / belt on the correct torx socket on the condition that no responsibility if I stuffed up his torx socket set with one socket split - it did not; I was impressed and asked him where he bought the torx socket set? It was Bunnings and only around $25's; I have not been to Bunnings yet - about the only thing missing from my tools. [As David eluded to beware of phillips and pozidrive screwdrivers, subtle differences but pozidrive transmit greater torque.]

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    Quote Originally Posted by Johno1 View Post

    ...

    The bolt in the floor holding the seat belt is proving especially stubborn and again not matching the size well. I might take some of the odd sized nuts to someone with all the different spaners and find out what they are.
    Are the seat belts factory fitted or fitted later in Australia? If the latter, the attaching bolts are probably not metric.

    Cheers

    Alec
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  15. #15
    Tadpole
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    Great point about warranty process at Aldi.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Armidillo View Post
    Are the seat belts factory fitted or fitted later in Australia? If the latter, the attaching bolts are probably not metric.
    Cheers
    Alec
    And do they bolt through the floorpan? If so, you may find that any threads sticking out the far side are badly corroded and will make removing the bolts significantly harder - with the result that the bolts could shear. If there are threads on the other side, give them a once-over with a wire brush and some penetrating oil to 'help them on their way'.
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