DS Manual Height Adjustment
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Thread: DS Manual Height Adjustment

  1. #1
    Member Errol_S's Avatar
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    Default DS Manual Height Adjustment

    Greetings

    I have received conflicting opinions to my question, and am hoping someone out there can clarify things for me.

    I have had 2 DS models, a 23 Pallas and a 20. On the Pallas if I placed the manual adjuster in the low jack position, apart from the suspension lowering, the system would completely depressurise and the spheres could be moved from side to side. On the 20 however low jack simply lowers the suspension and the system remains under pressure. Which is correct, and what would make them so different?

    Thanks
    Errol

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    Fellow Frogger! marc61's Avatar
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    If the front spheres are still under pressure, the height corrector hasn’t completely allowed the line feeding the spheres to exhaust fluid back to the reservoir when the manual adjuster is set to low. I’m not sure why it happens, a mechanical linkage issue or maybe a HC problem. I had this problem on a Safari for years and never solved it, so would be interested to know how to fix it.
    Cheers, Marc.

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  3. #3
    1000+ Posts Ken W's Avatar
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    I have had lots of Citroens that have progressed to doing this. I just put some blocks under them so that they don't quite sink to the bump stops and they will then depressurise OK so the spheres can be removed easily.

    Cheers, Ken
    Last edited by Ken W; 17th October 2017 at 07:58 AM.

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    1000+ Posts gerrypro's Avatar
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    I wonder how good your accumulator sphere is, or how well your regulator seals. If regulator loses pressure very quickly it would be as if you had loosened the 12mm bleed screw to depressurise the system. Then the suspension spheres would lose all pressure and the cylinders would be able to be rocked in their mountings!
    Cheers Gerry

  5. #5
    Tadpole birks's Avatar
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    Never remove suspension spheres before releasing the hydraulic pressure !
    Some old cars loose their bumpstops due to deterioration by oil contamination or mechanical deforemation of
    the bumpstop holders.
    The mechanical adjustment of the height correctors in combination with the torque rods connected to the anti rollbars should be adjusted so as not to interfere with each other.
    This can only be done on a hoyst with ramps. NEVER ATTEMPT THIS BY LAYING UNDER THE VEHICLE !!!
    Cheers Keith.


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  6. #6
    1000+ Posts Ken W's Avatar
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    Maybe it is the bump stops that have collapsed over time and use, that cause this to start happening.

    Cheers, Ken

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    Member Errol_S's Avatar
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    Thanks for the responses. However I still am none the wiser as to whether the system should depressurise when placed on low, or not. Based on the comments by Marc I assume it should depressurise. BTW both cars referred to initially have new rubber stops all round.

    Regards
    Errol

  8. #8
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    it should depresurise. I'm betting it's a very slight linkage or rollbar clamp alignment issue. Just ignore it ... if the car drives fine and rides at the correct height it is safe. Just life the car witha jack slightly to exhaust the pressure before you remove the spheres for servicing.

    seeya,
    Shane L.
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  9. #9
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    you could give it a dose of that hydraurincage flushing fluid for LHM, see if it shakes some crap out of the system etc. Citroen Classics sell it.

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    Member Errol_S's Avatar
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    Thanks Shane. A definitive answer at last.

    I suspect there is an internal leak somewhere as the pump interval is too frequent. No sign of external leakage under the normal telltale spots such as steering. Think I might just ignore it for now as reading posts on troubleshooting these leaks looks like a never ending, and expensive exercise.

    BTW please elaborate on 'just lift the car slightly' to depressurise. I have done this without success, so guess I am lifting in the wrong spot, or do need to release the regulator valve as well?

    Regards
    Errol

  11. #11
    1000+ Posts Ken W's Avatar
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    Errol,

    I have found it best to put some blocks or stands under the car when it is at normal height and then put the height control level on low. Don't block it right up when it is in the high position and then set it to low as when you put it back to high, it may still think it is already on high and may not re-pressurize the suspension when you start the engine. If this happens, you have to lower them on the jack to about normal height and then they will rise off the jack when set to high position. Ah the joys of arthritic height controllers.

    Cheers, Ken
    Last edited by Ken W; 20th October 2017 at 01:29 PM. Reason: improve grammar

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    I found to change spheres without unscewing the regulator valve, put the height lever on lowest notch then jack one side of the car only. The low side spheres should move freely. I used to do it on the CX as the regulator was under the front of the car. David

  13. #13
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Caisson View Post
    I found to change spheres without unscewing the regulator valve, put the height lever on lowest notch then jack one side of the car only. The low side spheres should move freely. I used to do it on the CX as the regulator was under the front of the car. David
    Oh no .... don't do this ... if there is pressure in one side ... there WILL be pressure in the other side. lifting just one side will achieve nothing. If the car is on low, and the spheres rattle around, yes you can change them without releasing the regulator bleed screw ( in theory you only need to do this when working on the brakes or accumulator circuit). Lowering the car onto blocks is a good idea for releasing the pressure in a car that doesn't quite drop low enough to completelly exhaust the pressure in the system (or you could just leave it overnight ).

    Each side of the car shares the hydraulic pressure with the other. The axles however are isolated by there individual height correctors.

    seeya,
    Shane L.
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    '63 ID19 http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/showthread.php?t=90325
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    '78 GS1220 pallas
    '92 Range Rover Classic ... 5spd manual.

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    Why would anyone not depressurise the accumulator/regulator before changing spheres? It is only a matter of releasing the respective bolt several turns with a 12 mm spanner. I have been told to be careful not to completely remove the pressure release bolt.
    Caisson likes this.

  15. #15
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by moulton2speed View Post
    Why would anyone not depressurise the accumulator/regulator before changing spheres? It is only a matter of releasing the respective bolt several turns with a 12 mm spanner. I have been told to be careful not to completely remove the pressure release bolt.
    I've done it before. You will get leakage if there is leakage across the height corrector from teh high pressure line to the suspension circuit. The height correctors slide valve will be wedged over on the exhaust side with the lever on low. So you should never get high pressure leakage.

    THe smart thing to do is to open the regulator bleed screw and ensure there is no pressure left anywhere (you need to pump the brake pedal a LOT to exhaust the brake accumulator )

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    Caisson likes this.
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    Proper cars--
    '85 Series II CX2500 GTi Turbo I
    '63 ID19 http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/showthread.php?t=90325
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas (last looked at ... about 15years ago)
    '78 GS1220 pallas
    '92 Range Rover Classic ... 5spd manual.

    Yay ... No Slugomatics


    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual

  16. #16
    Member Errol_S's Avatar
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    Thanks Ken. I left my DS on blocks for over a week and it never depressurised, but then I realised I had left the adjuster in the normal position. As soon as I placed it on low there was a hiss and the system depressurised. Stupidity.
    Ken W likes this.

  17. #17
    Fellow Frogger! Bruce Llewellyn's Avatar
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    Parking it on blocks extends the suspension boot and bump stop life.

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    Fellow Frogger! caparobertsan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleChevron View Post
    Oh no .... don't do this ... if there is pressure in one side ... there WILL be pressure in the other side. lifting just one side will achieve nothing. If the car is on low, and the spheres rattle around, yes you can change them without releasing the regulator bleed screw ( in theory you only need to do this when working on the brakes or accumulator circuit). Lowering the car onto blocks is a good idea for releasing the pressure in a car that doesn't quite drop low enough to completelly exhaust the pressure in the system (or you could just leave it overnight ).

    Each side of the car shares the hydraulic pressure with the other. The axles however are isolated by there individual height correctors.

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    I am definitely with Shane. It is bloody dangerous to work on the hydaruic system with pressure in it!
    1961 Citroen ID19(2010~), Holden Frontera(R.I.P 2002-2014), Honda Accord EURO(2006~)

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