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Thread: Nanyang "XAS" availability?

  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by tresbon View Post
    OK, I will just do a new message without replying to one.
    I just picked up my tyres from Tarzia yesterday. They can't balance the wheels because of the tiny centre hole, so I will be taking them to a Bob Jane place.
    I note that there is no reference on them to Nankang, only Retro and that the side marked Outside makes the tread pattern the reverse of that on my Michelin XASs. Does this matter?
    They are marked as tubeless, but is it better (albeit more expensive) if I get tubes fitted?

    Don
    If you have the ones that seem inside out then mount them outside out (see above post). The only worry I have here is tyre age. The wrong way round ones were earlier in manufacture (the mistake was later corrected) & you might be being sold old stock. I'd check the 4 digit code on the sidewall & demand a refund if the tyres are older than 2 years of age.

    Emphatically do not fit tubes to a tubeless tyre. The rim profile (a slight difference in slope of the land near the bead) is not a concern unless you have such low inflation pressures (near flat) that the most insensitive driver would sense something is wrong. Tubeless tyres on a rim originally intended for a tubed tyre is fine. Tubes in a tubeless tyre is not fine. Why?

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    The inside envelope of a tube-type tyre is smooth. The inside envelope of a tubeless tyre is not smooth; it is ridged. Put a tube in such a tyre & two problems ensue: tube chafing & heat generation. A deflation in a tubeless tyre is usually gradual but in a tube-type one it is rather sudden & more dangerous & something to be avoided, not made more probable by stressing the tube by having it work on the inner envelope of a tubeless tyre.

    So, my recommendation is to ignore the outside/inside manufacturer stuff-up & fit the more solid shoulder to the outside a la Xas & definitely don't fit tubes.

    cheers! Peter

  2. #27
    Fellow Frogger! Don B. Cilly's Avatar
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    We've had this discussion before, haven't we
    (anyone who hasn't read it, may be interested).

    After careful consideration (I'm by no means certain I'm right)... I'm still going with the tubes option.
    - In Europe, they all seem to agree.
    - My 70-year-old tyre man... what he said about seeing tubes explode because of a paper label or duct tape... but not because of ribs... somehow it rings true, difficult to explain.
    - I'm still running with tubes on tubeless (and so is everyone else I know personally).

    Best solution would obviously be the British wheels with the proper rims... expensive... failing that, I'm still (though I may be wrong) going with tubes.
    Last edited by Don B. Cilly; 30th September 2017 at 06:42 AM.

  3. #28
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    Um, I didn't suggest explosion, just the normal point that when a tube fails, the deflation is sudden when the air whooshes out of the valve stem hole.

    Yep, the discussion is, in part, repetitive but that is the way of A.F. & old threads.

    cheers! Peter

  4. #29
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    Thanks for that Peter. The tyre date code is 2317 which seems to indicate that they are still wanting us to put the tyres on with the 'XAS' tread reversed from the Michelin original. I doubt if these tyres are actually constructed in the sophisticated way like the Michelins so shall have them put on to match my genuine XASs. I will try them without tubes and see how the pressures hold up.
    cheers, Don
    Quote Originally Posted by 4cvg View Post
    If you have the ones that seem inside out then mount them outside out (see above post). The only worry I have here is tyre age. The wrong way round ones were earlier in manufacture (the mistake was later corrected) & you might be being sold old stock. I'd check the 4 digit code on the sidewall & demand a refund if the tyres are older than 2 years of age.

    Emphatically do not fit tubes to a tubeless tyre. The rim profile (a slight difference in slope of the land near the bead) is not a concern unless you have such low inflation pressures (near flat) that the most insensitive driver would sense something is wrong. Tubeless tyres on a rim originally intended for a tubed tyre is fine. Tubes in a tubeless tyre is not fine. Why?

    The inside envelope of a tube-type tyre is smooth. The inside envelope of a tubeless tyre is not smooth; it is ridged. Put a tube in such a tyre & two problems ensue: tube chafing & heat generation. A deflation in a tubeless tyre is usually gradual but in a tube-type one it is rather sudden & more dangerous & something to be avoided, not made more probable by stressing the tube by having it work on the inner envelope of a tubeless tyre.

    So, my recommendation is to ignore the outside/inside manufacturer stuff-up & fit the more solid shoulder to the outside a la Xas & definitely don't fit tubes.

    cheers! Peter

  5. #30
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    FWIW - I have been using Yokohama Avid TRZ's (205/70x15's) on both my 72 Sedan and 69.5 Wagon from years - sans inner tubes - on the original rims with nary a problem. Fantastic grip - no problem with rear fender clearance - and they handle just fine in the occasional rain we sometimes get in SoCal. They hold pressure well (as good as a tube type tire) and have gotten quite good mileage out of them - in spite of more than just 'aggressive' driving on back roads here in California.

    And have to agree - if you are fitting tubeless tires - do not fit tubes - as they 'screw' up the inside of the tubeless units big time. And with good quality tires and undamaged factory rims one should not have to balance them. That has been my experience for a long, long time. On the occasion that I had new tires fitted and store 'balanced' them, I wound up pulling those bloody weights off as soon as I got home

    Steve

  6. #31
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    Nice to hear that there would be no clearance problem with 195/65 at the rear. One really can get some nice tyres in that size.

    205/70 tends to be a commercial tyre size though some SUV type stuff is also available (the Avid TRZ is no more). If one is desperate to fit asymmetric Michelins & doesn't mind 205/70 (which preserves the gearing of 185/80) then the Latitude Cross is available in this size.

    Personally, I'd fit 4 195/65-15 PremiumContact 5 tyres now that rear clearance is attested to be not a problem.

    If one does get a slow leak from rim distortion (that rim truing doesn't solve) then there are goops available to seal things.

    cheers! Peter
    cjl likes this.

  7. #32
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    I fitted 4 new Nankang Classic RC-001 185R15/93H tyres (branded 'Retro') to my DS 23 automatic a week ago. (Nankang is the brand name on the tax invoice from Tarzia Tyre Centre in Adelaide.)

    Before fitting the tyres we had the tubeless / tube debate and Nick recommended not fitting tubes. They fitted a couple of tyres and tested them for air-tightness. One rim leaked and one was OK, so they recommended sealing all rims on the inside before fitting the tyres. So far this has proven a worthwhile step: all pressures remain as they were a week ago.

    Nick Tarzia is in the process of obtaining an adapter to enable wheels without the usual centre bore to be balanced on his tyre balancer, so in the meantime we agreed that I would try them without balancing. I have travelled at up to 65 mph since fitting the new tyres and there's no sign of any wheel shimmy or other adverse behaviour which might suggest a balance or 'roundness' issue.

    In my view the auto version of the D is a 'tourer' rather than a 'tearer'; hence, I would comment that the tyres' performance is adequate in the dry. (We haven't had any rain in the past week.)

    On the face of it, Tarzia Tyre Centre is a small independent tyre retailer owned and operated by Nick Tarzia. I was impressed with their service and so far the tyres seem fine for my requirements. Chris

  8. #33
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    "... In my view the auto version of the D is a 'tourer' rather than a 'tearer'; hence, I would comment that the tyres' performance is adequate in the dry. (We haven't had any rain in the past week.) ..."

    I think that it would be of interest to fellow-Froggers for you to report on wet grip in due course. Even for a "tourer", two wet scenarios are of potential concern: the emergency swerve & the emergency brake (perhaps combined). Each is easily simulated.

    cheers! Peter
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