CITROEN C5 Why didn't the X7 sell? - Page 4
  • Register
  • Help
Page 4 of 5 First 12345 Last
Results 76 to 100 of 105
Like Tree47Likes

Thread: CITROEN C5 Why didn't the X7 sell?

  1. #76
    JBN
    JBN is offline
    1000+ Posts JBN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    7,862

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by robmac View Post
    So true, modern car owners are too busy earning the money to pay for their "executive car".

    The decision is often made based on resale value, likely maintenance costs and ease of service. And the all important aspect of what others think.

    Advertisement


    Modern executive car owners don't have imagination, nor are they enthusiasts of any single brand. They choose a vehicle based on the accepted norm of their peer group.

    EDIT: If Citroen, had followed path that Lexus pursued, they might now be successful in the luxury car market.

    Marketing and brand loyalty is everything in the luxury car market.
    With all the money they spend for their luxury cars, none get the admiration of my daily driver 2CV. I get a nice comment every day I drive it. Most people comment on how good the paint job is. Two tone plums and custard done in a Charleston style, painted in 1995 in German Glazurit two pack. Always looks shiny. I wish the blistering rusty metal underneath was as strong and long lasting as the paint. It also sports an automatic seat height feature. Over time the rubber bands (literally, I kid you not) that hold the canvas base of the seats get old and break. After I get tired of readjusting the rear vision mirror because I sit lower and lower, I remove the seat and replace some of the old rubber bands. Bingo! I sit taller, walk taller and no longer suffer from shaggers back.

    John
    ScotFrog and Motorgnome like this.

  2. #77
    Member CC1701's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Melbourne, Sendai
    Posts
    56

    Default

    Why didn’t the X7 sell?
    The Hydropneumatic suspension.
    It excels on rough and corrugated back roads. But roads aren’t like that anymore. So on the first test drive it feels like a yacht, almost disconcerting, if you’re not familiar with it.
    A good strut spring/damper set-up (and rear torsion beams) do an equally good job on the smooth(ish) roads and highways we enjoy today with the benefit of no yacht feeling.
    There are few places where Hydropneumatic can outshine a conventional suspension set-up and active magnetic dampers are probably the best solution for the current era.
    And for some strange reason (marketing) they chose to fit the X7 with 17, 18 & 19’s on liquorice strap tyres leaving them with a sharp, crashing ride over singular irregularities. I feel they ride much better on 17’s than 18’s or 19’s (others may have different views). 16/60’s might have been a better choice for ride quality. But bigger wheels lower profile tyres equal better handling – right? What do the marketing guys think X7 owners are turning up for track days?
    From a manufacturing and engineering point of view it’s easy to see why Hydropneumatic has been discontinued, there is no net gain on the road surfaces must of us enjoy these days.
    Sadly Hydropneumatic suspension is a relic of a bygone era.
    Then there is the front cup holder – you can have a cup holder or a storage bin; not both!
    That said, our X7 Tourer is just fantastic. Driving is an event in itself. It’s wonderful and almost without equal for effortlessness and loveliness. It’s hard to fault (except for that cup holder) the steering is a bit void, but that’s easy to overlook. Just love it to bits in every respect. The X7 is without peer and one of the best kept secrets.
    Yes, yes, I know many of you love the Hydropneumatic suspension;- and it is magnificent but it had its day and the world moved on. So did PSA.
    Motorgnome likes this.

  3. #78
    1000+ Posts
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    8,066

    Default

    A large proportion of C5s are on conventional springs, without hydraulics. Both are good as any to drive in, though hydraulics deal with rough surfaces better. This journalists' notion that family sedan cars should handle like sports cars on a mountain pass is idiotic.

    I have never used a cup holder in my life. Nor do I have any interest in takeaway coffee flavoured milk drinks consumed on the road, and cannot understand why motoring writers think it's important. I asked a few people at a gathering about this once, and none of those present used them driving and half didn't use them ever.

  4. #79
    Too many posts! JohnW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Perth, WA, Australia
    Posts
    10,264

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by seasink View Post
    This journalists' notion that family sedan cars should handle like sports cars on a mountain pass is idiotic.
    Hear, hear. It's nonsense. As has been said before on this Forum, "what happened to ride comfort?" I watch some of these modern devices bumping up and down on the gentle undulations and minor irregularities on good roads and just shake my head. Their heads, of course, are being jerked around, a bit like the treatment of their wallets when they bought the things.

    Having said that, I reckon CC1701 is on the money. Although I see that M-B and Land Rover are using some sort of air suspension - two people I know have bought them and I haven't yet had a ride. But they are $80K+ vehicles and cost way more than I can imagine spending. I don't know about Toyota's rear hydropneumatics system, which Shane noted had reduced the towbar weight allowance (!) but that is also a $100K vehicle.

    Cheers
    JohnW

    Renault 4CV 1951
    Renault R8 1965
    Renault Scenic 2005 (wife's)
    Renault Scenic 2007 (mine)
    Renault Scenic 2006 (daughter's)
    CitroŽn CX Pallas 1980

    National Co-ordinator, Renault 4CV Register of Australia

  5. #80
    1000+ Posts gerrypro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Camperdown 3260 Australia
    Posts
    2,931

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CC1701 View Post
    Why didn’t the X7 sell?
    The Hydropneumatic suspension.
    It excels on rough and corrugated back roads. But roads aren’t like that anymore. So on the first test drive it feels like a yacht, almost disconcerting, if you’re not familiar with it.
    A good strut spring/damper set-up (and rear torsion beams) do an equally good job on the smooth(ish) roads and highways we enjoy today with the benefit of no yacht feeling.
    There are few places where Hydropneumatic can outshine a conventional suspension set-up and active magnetic dampers are probably the best solution for the current era.
    You should try driving on our 'wonderfully maintained' rural roads in South West Victoria. Even Highway 1 -- the Princes highway will soon sell you the benefits of Hydro-pneumatic Suspension. Seriously, Rural Victorian roads are a disgrace!
    Cheers Gerry

  6. #81
    Fellow Frogger!
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Wagga Wagga
    Posts
    326

    Default

    Haven't owned or ridden in a C7. Have owned or still do,a DS, CX, Valver and CT turbo. Now mostly drive an Evo X, RS Clio 2L and Patrol. Their ride is crappy, but the driving experience is involving in a different way than comfort- huge acceleration and handling ( except Patrol tow vehicle). Does that make up for ride? At the moment, yes. All have functional cup holders.
    The latte set get several mentions above in reference to cup holders. I think most have missed the point of cup holders in 21st century. AC is on and windows tightly up unlike the old days of getting hair blown and struggling to hear the radio or 8 track. The C7 has an older owner image which probably didn't help sales when one looks at the age of buyers in TV adverts. One health issue with ageing is declining kidney function due to dehydration. So as we enjoy our long commutes, big distances between stops in supreme comfort, coffee and beer does not cut it. Water is the only thing that will help alertness and hydrate those kidneys. Get yourself a bidon and fill with water and use those cup holders for what they were designed. Hope you are enjoying le Tour.

  7. #82
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Ballarat,Vic,Aust.
    Posts
    16,153

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CC1701 View Post
    Why didn’t the X7 sell?
    The Hydropneumatic suspension.
    It excels on rough and corrugated back roads. But roads aren’t like that anymore. So on the first test drive it feels like a yacht, almost disconcerting, if you’re not familiar with it.
    A good strut spring/damper set-up (and rear torsion beams) do an equally good job on the smooth(ish) roads and highways we enjoy today with the benefit of no yacht feeling.
    There are few places where Hydropneumatic can outshine a conventional suspension set-up and active magnetic dampers are probably the best solution for the current era.
    And for some strange reason (marketing) they chose to fit the X7 with 17, 18 & 19’s on liquorice strap tyres leaving them with a sharp, crashing ride over singular irregularities. I feel they ride much better on 17’s than 18’s or 19’s (others may have different views). 16/60’s might have been a better choice for ride quality. But bigger wheels lower profile tyres equal better handling – right? What do the marketing guys think X7 owners are turning up for track days?
    From a manufacturing and engineering point of view it’s easy to see why Hydropneumatic has been discontinued, there is no net gain on the road surfaces must of us enjoy these days.
    Sadly Hydropneumatic suspension is a relic of a bygone era.
    Then there is the front cup holder – you can have a cup holder or a storage bin; not both!
    That said, our X7 Tourer is just fantastic. Driving is an event in itself. It’s wonderful and almost without equal for effortlessness and loveliness. It’s hard to fault (except for that cup holder) the steering is a bit void, but that’s easy to overlook. Just love it to bits in every respect. The X7 is without peer and one of the best kept secrets.
    Yes, yes, I know many of you love the Hydropneumatic suspension;- and it is magnificent but it had its day and the world moved on. So did PSA.
    Wow ... where do you live with these great roads The roads around here are all crap.... Gimme a decent hydraulic car every single time!
    gerrypro likes this.
    'Cit' homepage:
    Citroen Workshop
    Proper cars--
    '85 Series II CX2500 GTi Turbo I
    '63 ID19 http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/citro%EBn-forum/90325-best-project-car-you-have-ever-seen.html
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas (last looked at ... about 15years ago)
    '78 GS1220 pallas
    '92 Range Rover Classic ... 5spd manual.

    Yay ... No Slugomatics


    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual

  8. #83
    Fellow Frogger!
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    World's largest coal port
    Posts
    376

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CC1701 View Post
    Why didn’t the X7 sell?
    .
    Yes, yes, I know many of you love the Hydropneumatic suspension;- and it is magnificent but it had its day and the world moved on. So did PSA.
    …… some brands (eg Rolls Royce, Mercedes, Lexus, Audi, Cadillac, Land Rover etc) moved to air suspension, especially in their prestige models. The advantages offered by air are not dissimilar to hydraulic (comfort, self levelling, height control, different modes etc).

    The downside of either hydraulic or air suspension is that it comes at a price. Given the kind of car PSA is now producing and the market they are seeking, I don’t think they would be price competitive offering this kind of feature today. For the non-discerning buyer, they will probably be more influenced by electronic gadgetry (and cup holders!), something that can be supplied far more cheaply than advanced suspension.

    While the ride is excellent in normal mode, it is nice to be able to select sport mode for stretches of undulating or windy roads. Similarly, it is nice to be able to raise the car to get up a kerb, or traverse a steep invert. Other advantages are less obvious eg Mercedes suggest lowering the ride height at speed results in a 3-percent improvement in drag (https://www.edmunds.com/fuel-economy...l-economy.html ). In our most recent trip from Newcastle to Brisbane, we averaged 4.9 litres per 100 kms (quite respectable for a 1780kg car loaded with luggage and not spared). I wonder whether the automatic lowering of height in some small way contributed to this?
    Last edited by turnbull151; 23rd July 2018 at 10:18 AM.

  9. #84
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Ballarat,Vic,Aust.
    Posts
    16,153

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by turnbull151 View Post
    …… some brands (eg Rolls Royce, Mercedes, Lexus, Audi, Cadillac, Land Rover etc) moved to air suspension, especially in their prestige models. The advantages offered by air are not dissimilar to hydraulic (comfort, height control, different modes etc).

    The downside of either hydraulic or air suspension is that it comes at a price. Given the kind of car PSA is now producing and the market they are seeking, I don’t think they would be price competitive offering this kind of feature today. For the non-discerning buyer, they will probably be more influenced by electronic gadgetry (and cup holders!), something that can be supplied far more cheaply than advanced suspension.

    While the ride is excellent in normal mode, it is nice to be able to select sport mode for stretches of undulating or windy roads. Similarly, it is nice to be able to raise the car to get up a kerb, or traverse a steep invert. Other advantages are less obvious eg Mercedes suggest lowering the ride height at speed results in a 3-percent improvement in drag (https://www.edmunds.com/fuel-economy...l-economy.html ). In our most recent trip from Newcastle to Brisbane, we averaged 4.9 litres per 100 kms (quite respectable for a 1780kg car loaded with luggage and not spared). I wonder whether the automatic lowering of height in some small way contributed to this?
    I'm not sold on air suspension. Bags are easily staked and have a finite life. The compressors seem to have a very limited life...... But the main thing is, I reckon the coil sprung cars ride better (try an early range rover classic versus an air suspended model)....... Hydraulics.......... They should have used hydraulics! So long as they protected the lines undernearth (so they wouldn't get damaged offroad) they would last the life of the car.

    The main bonus I see with air, is self levelling when you add a load/caravan to the car.

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    'Cit' homepage:
    Citroen Workshop
    Proper cars--
    '85 Series II CX2500 GTi Turbo I
    '63 ID19 http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/showthread.php?t=90325
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas (last looked at ... about 15years ago)
    '78 GS1220 pallas
    '92 Range Rover Classic ... 5spd manual.

    Yay ... No Slugomatics


    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual

  10. #85
    1000+ Posts gerrypro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Camperdown 3260 Australia
    Posts
    2,931

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CC1701 View Post
    Yes, yes, I know many of you love the Hydropneumatic suspension;- and it is magnificent but it had its day and the world moved on. So did PSA.
    Pity Vic Roads didn't move on and provide a decent road network. I am not talking about local council roads. I mean the major main road network controlled by the state authority. Garbage!!!!!!!
    Cheers Gerry

  11. #86
    1000+ Posts
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    8,066

    Default

    And yet every time my wife and I cross a border we remark about how well OUR taxes get spent when we move interstate. Try the main roads in the Hunter Valley for a change. Dungog area comes to mind.

  12. #87
    1000+ Posts garyk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    sydney
    Posts
    1,054

    Default

    The marketing people at Citroen know more than I do about the sales figures, .... however ....
    cars are so much about identity, and perception. Around where I live, it seems that to "belong" it must be a MB, BMW or Audi.
    Preferably black. Especially if you are a realtor.
    Perhaps a Golf (or a small Audi) for the "little lady" (and no disrespect meant by that), or ... a Toyota / Mazda if you want to stay "normal and average."

    Very few people regard the C5 as a prestige brand on the MB, BMW or Audi level ... even if the C5 realistically is up there.

    Or else, a massive SUV is de riggeur for mum and the kids, (and almost everyone else?)
    So MB, BMW and Audi SUVs are quite abundant (along with the rest of the brands).

    The suspension thing is somewhat similar (perception), in the 60/70s quite a few cars as well as Citroen did offer a soft ride.
    Think of the Hydrolastic BMC cars, and indeed, the quality of ride in the Peugeots and Renaults.
    Moving to the 80/90s and beyond, ride became less of an obvious design feature, and I'd say that by the 2000s, perception and expectation was that a relatively harsh ride (and seats?) was just "normal."

    Equally, as much as the C5s do ride well, it isn't in the same floating domain that the early Citroens exhibited.
    X7/C5 ride is better than offered by many cars, but not as exceptional as it was in the Good Ole Days.

    Some years ago I had the opportunity to drive a mixed lot of Mercedes models, and all had a dreadful ride excepting the E series, which was reasonable. This hasn't dampened their popularity.

    So the X7 C5 probably *falls between a number of chairs* as a perceived up market car.
    "Suspension".... with added complexity, is probably not a huge priority.

    Hasn't "the market" changed, too?

    It seems like only a few years ago we discussed the Family Car as a Holden or Ford.
    The Falcon and the Commodore may have been the parallel of the C5 as a standard sized family sedan.

    That concept is virtually defunct now.
    Putting all that together, the X7 isn't a car that is going to appeal to a wide demographic.
    Once upon a time:


    Many R4s (incl. fourgonnette), R5LS, R16TS.


    GS 1015, 1220, sedans and wagons.
    CX 2200, 2400.
    ID 1966, 1969, DS21H, DSpecial, DS23 Pallas.
    C5 2002, 2004 petrol and diesel.
    D Special 1974
    Xantia Activa 1998 (look out Gulargambone)
    GS 5 speed sedan (what a tale)
    1986 2CV6
    CX25GTi 1985 auto
    CX2500 IE Pallas 1985 auto
    DS23EFI 1975 Pallas

    And now:

    C5 2.2 HDI 2005 wagon
    DS23 1973 Pallas

  13. #88
    Too many posts! JohnW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Perth, WA, Australia
    Posts
    10,264

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by seasink View Post
    And yet every time my wife and I cross a border we remark about how well OUR taxes get spent when we move interstate. Try the main roads in the Hunter Valley for a change. Dungog area comes to mind.
    Try Menindee to Ivanhoe.... Or the bitumen from Ivanhoe to West Wyalong for that matter.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails CITROEN C5 Why didn't the X7 sell?-near-menindee-dawn.jpg  
    JohnW

    Renault 4CV 1951
    Renault R8 1965
    Renault Scenic 2005 (wife's)
    Renault Scenic 2007 (mine)
    Renault Scenic 2006 (daughter's)
    CitroŽn CX Pallas 1980

    National Co-ordinator, Renault 4CV Register of Australia

  14. #89
    Member CC1701's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Melbourne, Sendai
    Posts
    56

    Default

    By the standards of developed counties, our road in Australia can only be compared to those of sixteenth century New Guinea. Our roads and transport infrastructure are somewhere between embarrassing and disgraceful.
    That said, even the miserable state of our roads they are far, far superior to the roads of the 50’s & 60’s for which Hydropneumatic was intended for.

    Although the X7 has lots of grip, is nicely balanced and handles quite well, but it’s not a sports car. It’s a tourer; an appliance to cover distances, in varied conditions in isolated comfort. The steering is a bit of an acquired taste, though. It steers the car reasonably well, but it’s not a surgical scalpel like in an Alfa Romeo, nor should it be, or pretend to be.

    The polarised views on cup holders is, perhaps, as key to the X7 sales as is the Hydropneumatic suspension. For a long time Jag went about building nice comfortable, out of date, but charming, cars seemingly oblivious to the changes in customer expectations. Ten years ago they realised that to survive they needed to build cars that a new generation wanted to drive, not club lounges that their miniscule customer base couldn’t let go of, and didn’t update very often.
    Cup holders aren’t about drinking coffee, they are about the kind of convenience that is expected in a modern car; places to put the things that you’ll need to easily access. It’s about functional, accessible nav and infotainment systems that make a journey easy, comfortable and safe. The overall functionality of any car needs to meet with the expectation of a generation of car buyers who have become accustom too, or been spoilt with, lots of kit and features that enhance the useability, and therefore safety, of cars. Looking down to find a bottle of water in the centre console isn’t just inconvenient, it’s downright dangerous; and the safety of my family is paramount.
    Garyk has it bang on.

    Did the Hydropneumatic suspension scare customers away? – For sure. The first time my wife and I test drove an X7, she was slightly motion sick and felt the ride quite disconcerting. Customers who walk out of the showroom after such an experience never come back. Of course, after several more test drives she got used to it, but it was a hard slog to convince her to get back in one after the first test drive. “Charming, characterful cars” for a limited, specialist audience is where Jag were 10 years ago. They moved on, and rightly, in my opinion, so have PSA. I’ve ridden in a lot of modern steel sprung cars that ride almost as good as the X7. Even air suspension can’t compete with magnetically adjustable dampers.

    All that said, the X7 is a truly wonderful and unique car in a world of otherwise identically bland offerings. I can nit-pick about the steering and cup holder, but really I just love every aspect of it, and the suspension is a wonderful experience and an astonishing piece of engineering art. I am glad to have one.

    So much do we like X7 that we’ll get another one as a runabout for when we are “back in the old country”. I’ve my eye on a low km 3.0 V6 petrol already.

  15. #90
    JBN
    JBN is offline
    1000+ Posts JBN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    7,862

    Default

    I leave tomorrow for Kalgoorlie, Laverton and the Anne Beadell highway to Coober Pedy. Instead of whinging as to how bad our roads are, I am chasing the worst before they become civilised.

    John

  16. #91
    Fellow Frogger!
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Mirboo North
    Posts
    158

    Default

    I realise they no longer offer the C5 in Australia, but do Citroen still build the C5 or x7 or whatever it's called for other markets still?
    Cheerio,

    Geoff (in Mirboo North)


    1994 405 SRDT white - (free to a good home, unreg. & needs injector pump re-fitting)
    1997 Toyota Hilux Surf
    2007 Citroen C5 Hdi Wagon
    2003 Merc Vito 112Cdi
    non-sequitur - 1951 Hudson Pacemaker brush-painted matt black!

  17. #92
    1000+ Posts gerrypro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Camperdown 3260 Australia
    Posts
    2,931

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JBN View Post
    I leave tomorrow for Kalgoorlie, Laverton and the Anne Beadell highway to Coober Pedy. Instead of whinging as to how bad our roads are, I am chasing the worst before they become civilised.

    John
    Are you taking the Deux Cheveaux or an X7 C5 as per discussions?
    What ever you will be comfortable.
    I just had a moment of revelation" if everyone drove Hydraulic-pneumatically suspended cars then our governmental bodies would opt out of repairing the roads"
    Perhaps we should keep these things a closely guarded secret!!!
    Last edited by gerrypro; 29th July 2018 at 02:14 PM.
    electroboy likes this.
    Cheers Gerry

  18. #93
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    33

    Default

    Hello
    Well I did my bit and bought two C5 new - a 6 speed diesel 1st series and an X7.

    Would I buy another new X7? I would if I could, but I can't.

    Have you checked out the new for 2019 508s on the Peugeot website. A bit more of an aggressive look AND a hatch!! What a shame this hasn't translated to a X7 Series II.

    The earlier X7 are starting to come on to the 2nd hand market at very attractive prices. That would be because if anyone goes to a dealer for a trade in this exposes the X7's greatest weakness - no it is NOT cup holders- it is depreciation.

    I have already had a bleat on Aussiefrogs about how I was insulted at Brisbane Citroen when trying to do a deal on one of the last new X7 wagons. Yes I was certainly prepared for a 3rd round of new Citroen, but not at any cost.

    So I am just going to keep driving this C5 because it IS a wonderful drive. My 17 year only drove it for the first time in +6 months (can't get her out of her C4) and she remarked how absolutely comfortable the C5 is "Just like driving around in the lounge room".

    Furthermore I'm going to put my money where my mouth is and I will happily shell out for a 3.0 V6 diesel X7 as a second special car. (Unless I stumble across a bargain C6 or an execeptionally low km C5 upgrade V6 petrol 6-speed).

    Cheers and happy in my X7 world
    Jason

  19. #94
    Member MELso's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    62

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by electroboy View Post
    I realise they no longer offer the C5 in Australia, but do Citroen still build the C5 or x7 or whatever it's called for other markets still?
    Still built in China, alongside the fugly C6. No hydro suspension on either though.

    Why didn't it sell? My thesis is that PSA cars, thanks to successive crap distributors, have become a marginal presence and are (sadly) in a slow motion death spiral. At one stage, you could get the X7 Attraction for about the same price as a Camry and less than a Mazda 6 ($33k driveaway), yet the Camry comfortably outsold it. Why? A tiny (mostly uninterested) dealer network.
    seasink and electroboy like this.
    2011 Citroen C5 - 'La Barge'

  20. #95
    1000+ Posts Ken W's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    North Brisbane
    Posts
    1,841

    Default

    Citroen have been there before. I bought a GSpecial for $4700 back in 1975 which was the same cost as a Toyota Corolla at the time. I love my C5 X7 as well and am just about to give it a huge mid-life service to hopefully get it all back to near new condition ready for another 200kkm.

    Cheers, Ken W
    GreenBlood likes this.

  21. #96
    1000+ Posts George 1/8th's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Melbourne, Victoria.
    Posts
    1,383

    Default

    I've never traveled in an X7, but I've sat in a few. I have a 2004 C5 V6, hatch, Auto. I've had it now for over 3 years. Absolutely the best car I've ever owned, including the DS21, The CX 2400 C-matic, and the the Xantia.
    Today I went for a fair drive down the Peninsula to attend my aunt's 97th birthday celebration. The car was faultless. I normally drive it very little these days , so the occasional long trip is always enjoyable.
    I really like the C5 X7s, but I have never seen one with a V6 petrol engine. It probably was never sold in Australia. I'm really not interested in diesel. If I find a good X7 I'll be very tempted to buy it. I'd want it to have everything I now have, so I'll just keep my current one because it's a hatch and sometimes I have to carry my son's drum kit around. Cheers.

  22. #97
    Fellow Frogger!
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    World's largest coal port
    Posts
    376

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by seasink View Post
    And yet every time my wife and I cross a border we remark about how well OUR taxes get spent when we move interstate. Try the main roads in the Hunter Valley for a change. Dungog area comes to mind.
    Drove the Stroud Hill Road to Dungog yesterday and this has to be the worst bitumen road I have encountered. In many sections, just wall to wall badly repaired (overfilled) pot holes. The Citroen twitched sideways on a couple of bends. In fairness, perhaps the engineers who designed the car never envisaged it would be driven on such rough roads!

  23. #98
    1000+ Posts
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    8,066

    Default

    The shire has the worst road surfaces to be found anywhere, and your sample was actually one of the better ones,

    It's a hangover from bitumen paving rural roads without the income to maintain them.

  24. #99
    Fellow Frogger! 505604's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Junee, NSW
    Posts
    638

    Default

    The shire has the worst road surfaces to be found anywhere
    Ummm, have you been to the Young Shire or the Wagga Wagga City Council areas lately?

    I recall driving in the Young district a little while back and heard over the 2way some truck driver using many expletives. Another truckie responded, asking him what was wrong, and the first came back with something about the state of the road he was driving on, that he'd never driven on such a bad road! The second driver's reply was simple - "welcome to Young Shire!".

    And Wagga's roads aren't a whole lot better.
    Last edited by 505604; 7th January 2019 at 06:30 PM. Reason: My quoting got lost.
    Current cars: Peugeot 307 HDi Touring; Peugeot 306 Cabriolet; Peugeot 406 HDi, Peugeot 505 Familiale
    Previous cars: Peugeot 404;
    Renault 16TS;
    Peugeot 504 1800;
    Peugeot 504 GL;
    Peugeot 504 LTI;
    Peugeot 505 Familiale;
    Peugeot 604 (converted to TD)
    Peugeot 306 Cabriolet

  25. #100
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Ballarat,Vic,Aust.
    Posts
    16,153

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by turnbull151 View Post
    Drove the Stroud Hill Road to Dungog yesterday and this has to be the worst bitumen road I have encountered. In many sections, just wall to wall badly repaired (overfilled) pot holes. The Citroen twitched sideways on a couple of bends. In fairness, perhaps the engineers who designed the car never envisaged it would be driven on such rough roads!
    Citroens bump steer now .... Like I said, as a daily driver for myself I'd have an X7 tomorrow...... One with proper hydraulic suspension. But really, if it has to be a modern PSA vehicle........ I want a C6s
    'Cit' homepage:
    Citroen Workshop
    Proper cars--
    '85 Series II CX2500 GTi Turbo I
    '63 ID19 http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/showthread.php?t=90325
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas (last looked at ... about 15years ago)
    '78 GS1220 pallas
    '92 Range Rover Classic ... 5spd manual.

    Yay ... No Slugomatics


    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual

Page 4 of 5 First 12345 Last

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •