berlingo engine part list ?
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  1. #1
    Tadpole
    Join Date
    May 2016
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    Melbourne
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    Default berlingo engine part list ?

    Afternoon everyone, I'm in the process of repairing a blingo with stripped timing belt and need some more info about engine parts. Its 2002 1.4 tu3p (kfw) engine, i will replace timing belt and water pump together with tensioner, than head gasket, and 6 of the valves need replacement.
    Is there a blueprint of engine parts, im not sure if small black gasket next to head gasket is part of the HG kit? Also, i've dissembled a water/oil thingy next to the head, is there a gasket for it or silicone needs to be used there? I can add pics if needed.
    The engine is now in parts and im in the process of ordering the above parts, i found
    http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/citro%EBn-forum/115081-timing-belt-kit-1999-citroen-berlingo-1-4l-petrol.html very useful.

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  2. #2
    Fellow Frogger
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    Jan 2004
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    Sydney
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    Hi. The motor is also used in the base C3 sold here, so that widens you choice of parts if you need to chase used items. Talk to forum sponsor French Connection as they would have scrapped a few Berlingos / C3s and Pug equivalents containing the relevant engine.

    You can find all of the parts diagrams by VIN for no cost if you register at
    CitroŽn Service
    You don't get any repair manual etc. for free as those are subscription services.

    I'd be thinking there is a formed gasket involved, but sealant / gasket eliminator is used in some places, often the sump.

  3. #3
    Tadpole
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    May 2016
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    Melbourne
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    Thanks. Was able to find out the rubbery thing is actually part of the head gasket, and that silicon gasket is used on oil/water chamber on the side of a head. Will get in touch with French connection in regards to parts, was surprised with quotes by big retailers, at the moment considering ordering from uk through ebay. It looks like peugeot 206 also uses tu3jp engine so i would expect internal parts of the engine like valves are shared with blingo, that would make my life a lot easier...

  4. #4
    Fellow Frogger!
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    canberra
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    750

    Default

    You may need new head bolts as well as they stretch, best check yours against max length
    as per previous posts support AF sponsors, EAI in Box Hill Melb are also good source of parts

  5. #5
    Tadpole
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    May 2016
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    Melbourne
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    thankyou both, service box site was really useful, was able to source all the parts locally (EAI for valves, local supplier for gasket and timing kit). Had a quick look at the bolts and they look within the specs so will reuse them after proper cleaning. Will start with valve job and hopefully finish it all up this weekend.
    On a side note, the cooling system looks really odd - water house goes from engine block through chassis and onto the radiator , wanted to flush the coolant but scared of disconnecting the pipe next to the radiator. Is there a trick to properly flush it, some sort of hidden plug, or ill do it while the water pump is out through that hole?

  6. #6
    Member
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    Feb 2003
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    Hobart Tasmania
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    Hi Dovlak, I am nearly finished doing a similar job on my 2007 Citroen Berlingo with 1.4 liter petrol motor.

    I too measured the head bolts and intended to reuse them. However, today I got very strong advice from a competent mechanic that you never reuse head bolts on vehicles with aluminium cylinder heads.

    He explained that a used bolt has stretched and lost it's elasticity and will not do the job of a new bolt. Considering the cost of new bolts is not excessive, I am going to take the mechanic's advice and not re-use the old bolts.

  7. #7
    Tadpole
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    May 2016
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    Melbourne
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    Im gonna risk it this time. I've just finished everything today, so far so good, the parts were arround $450 but all parts except valves needed replacement anyway, ie t belt kit, water pump, even headgasket was coroded once i took the head off.
    I have 2 questions though. Whats normal operating temp of the engine? My fans are starting when temp gauge goes one half into 3rd section , and off when temp is at half of the gauge.
    Also, exhaust manifold is cracked, is there a way to weld these or only replacement helps?

  8. #8
    Fellow Frogger
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    The bolts are sometimes OK to reuse, so you measure them up and discard any that have been stretched beyond the allowed limit.

    Most of PSA cars of the period suggest you use a filling cylinder on the reservoir to properly bleed them. The idea is you fill it and there will be a couple of bleed nipples, usually on the outlet tank on the end of the head and another at the heater union on the scuttle. The idea is you over fill the cylinder and then run the car until the fans cut in and out a couple of times. Then remove the excess coolant and filling cylinder. Without one, just make sure you bleed air at each bleed point and keep topping up the reservoir. The bleed caps are quite easily split, so tighten and check with care.

    The cooling fans on the early models sometimes played up. If the temperature sensor (light blue) on the outlet tank fails, the fans will likely go to high speed and you get an overheat warning when it isn't. If you lose low speed fans, the resistor pack on the radiator support is suspect. It should run around 90C, but if it goes immediately to the hot end of the gauge and you know it isn't, try another temp sensor.

    Manifold cracking was very common even when these cars were new. You may find the Oxygen sensor will not come out of your old one. Welding cast iron is always a bit of a challenge as you introduce cracks, but you have little to lose if have the tools and can ensure the face is flat afterwards. Best to replace or weld up some tubes instead.

    Another common issue on the earlier models was the gearbox. The bearings inside can fail, so don't ignore noises. There is a rivet that can let go on a selector fork and you then can't select gears. The linkages have probably been replaced over the years, but you still can get them falling off and the end of the selector rod bending. If the clutch feels stiff, start with the cable, but the release bearing can wear prematurely. Let reverse just slip in and don't try to ram it into gear.

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