The End is near..
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Thread: The End is near..

  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger! Vincenzo's Avatar
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    Default The End is near..

    I'm getting close to finishing the substantial interior panel work with my latest delivery from Europe. When I say "I'm" what is meant is "my panelbeater"... of course!

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    First a representative sample of the rear end delights found.. then we move on to some gentle undressing, building up to a modelling of the new couture.

    ETA is 10 days. There is a bit more to do than is seen here. I also bought a full set of door frame rubber holders since the existing ones are munted. Front cant-rail/a-pillar will need to be fabricated and the outside front guards have the usual rot in a minor way.

    The End is near..-gj-right-rear-end.jpgThe End is near..-img_0130.jpgThe End is near..-img_0133.jpgThe End is near..-img_0127.jpgThe End is near..-_mg_3683.jpgThe End is near..-_mg_3684.jpgThe End is near..-_mg_3687.jpgThe End is near..-_mg_3688.jpgThe End is near..-_mg_3694.jpgThe End is near..-_mg_3701.jpgThe End is near..-_mg_3702.jpg
    DS23 Pallas BVM Vert Argente - in ground up restoration, soon to be BVH.
    DSpecial 4speed Beige Vanneau, previous ; XM 2.0, maroon, my first.
    And a variety of the usual crapboxes before seeing the light. Except my Mini Cooper with the 3.4 cam and twin webers - that wasn't a POS.

    Bikes -
    Ducati GTS860, CB350, XT550, Z500, T250, XR200, ag90.

  2. #2
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Default

    Wow, that's a lot of work, well done for bringing the car back to life. What state are the floors and sills/box sections like?
    I had a DS where everything from the back seats forward was excellent but the boot area/inner rear wings and C pillars looked like they had been parked in the sea.....


    Sent from my iPhone using aussiefrogs
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  3. #3
    Fellow Frogger
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    I wonder when the standard repair will become a repro reshell as is already done for some rotted out high volume models? The rear wheelarches make a lot of sense given the repair sections leave a fair bit to be desired when compare them to the original compound curves.

    That c-pillar repair needs a little thought as to how you fit it up. You will probably need to butt weld at the top where it goes under the rubber to avoid a visible bump even if you lap it elsewhere. Have a look at what you can see and how the rubber fits up with the hinge and pillar cover trial fitted before you are committed and painted.

    While you are there, think about converting the boot aperture to a pinchweld rubber and dispensing with the thick foam seal. The original arrangement wasn't that good. Similarly, you could do much the same around rain gutters and delete the water trap crimping.
    Last edited by David S; 12th February 2017 at 12:03 PM.
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  4. #4
    Fellow Frogger! Greg's Avatar
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    Hi,

    Doing a great job........ Nice to see someone using the repro panels that are now available, and make the job so much easier, and the repair look so professional.

    I have 2 things that makes life even easier.:

    A hand held air powered tool that makes a rebate in sheetmetal on one side, and punches a hole in sheet metal the other side.They are about $100.00

    This tool gives you the ability to do a lap joint on a replacement panel, or on the panel on the car, that you can then spot weld the lap joint. Butt welding sheet metal doesn't work with a mig?

    The hole punch side lets you make a series of holes on a lap so you can plug weld with a Mig where you can't get access with a spot welder.

    The other tool is a spot welder, It's only a cheapy (Ebay), but I've had it for years and it makes light work of most repairs, and the repair looks correct and no grinding off heaps of over weld that you have when you use a mig.

    Leave the rear of the car original, the new boot lid seals don't absorb water like the original.

    Best regards,

    Greg
    Vincenzo likes this.
    We Have:
    C5 HDI Exclusive 2.7 '09, Pluriel '09, Berlingo 1.6 HDI '10, C4 VTS coupe. C4 Picasso '08, 2CV Charleston '84 Grey, 2CV, '55 Australian delivered. 15/6 H '55, SM '74 BVM, DS21 EFI BVH, DS21 '67 BVH.
    We Had:
    1930C6F, '73 GS1220 wagon X 2, '75 G special, '75 GS panel van, '74 GS Birotor, '82 GSA panel van with factory AC, '85 CX25GTI BVM, 2002 C5 V6, 2006, C5 S2 HDI, '86 BX19GT, '72 DS21 BVM, '55 15/6H, '54 Lt 15,'73 Dyane, '82 Visa Super X, with Chrono Mecs & factory AC, 1972 SM.

  5. #5
    Fellow Frogger
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    Spot welders are extremely useful, neat and quick. For anyone thinking of using one, consider that the typical 240V single phase units quickly run up against their limited duty cycle and capacity as the material thickness increases. There is also a tradeoff between material thickness and spot size (usually smaller than the factory welds), so it's important to know the limits of these units and not risk structural failures. It's a good idea to destructively test weld some scrap of the same type and thickness as the actual weld will be and then pull it apart to see if the welder settings are OK. If the spot weld doesn't tear out of one sheet and remain attached to the other sheet, then the weld is defective.
    jaahn and Vincenzo like this.

  6. #6
    1000+ Posts robmac's Avatar
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    Therein lies a real advantage of plug welds using the MIG.

    The "old" panel , with drilled out spot weld holes, can remain, and a new virgin panel can be attached by plug welding through the same holes.

    Even when re-attaching the "old drilled out" panel it's easy to clamp a thick piece of copper or brass behind it. Resulting a plug weld and panel repair in one.

    I'd buy a Mig every time in preference to a dedicated spot welder.
    Vincenzo likes this.

  7. #7
    Fellow Frogger! Vincenzo's Avatar
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    Thanks guys for your advice. I'm getting this done professionally by a guy who has come highly recommended. He has just rung me to say there is an issue with the repro left inside wheel arch panel and I need to go up to see him. The right hand side is ridgy-didge. He mentioned something about the c-pillar but I didn't understand. He has an industrial spot welder and can fabricate panels of all types with his english wheel and other magical stuff.

    The boot floor is going to be remade out of 1.2 steel with all the correct swaging(?) and I've seen it marked up and looking good. Also the rearseat aperture and parcel shelf is going to be replaced with fabricated steel sheeting. Photos will be forthcoming when I get up there next. What an adventure.
    DS23 Pallas BVM Vert Argente - in ground up restoration, soon to be BVH.
    DSpecial 4speed Beige Vanneau, previous ; XM 2.0, maroon, my first.
    And a variety of the usual crapboxes before seeing the light. Except my Mini Cooper with the 3.4 cam and twin webers - that wasn't a POS.

    Bikes -
    Ducati GTS860, CB350, XT550, Z500, T250, XR200, ag90.

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