DS brake caliper pistons
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Thread: DS brake caliper pistons

  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Default DS brake caliper pistons

    Hello

    I am rebuilding my brake calipers. Can anyone advise on how best to remove the pistons without damaging them? Mine are refusing to slide out of the caliper...

    AM

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  2. #2
    Fellow Frogger! Greg's Avatar
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    Compressed air

    Best regards,

    Greg
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    We Have:
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    Fellow Frogger! Rally's Avatar
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    Compressed air is the first choice , or a grease gun with a DS brake pipe thread fitting , just ease them out gently, if using air cover in rags as a piston can fly some distance if it pops out with to much pressure behind it .
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  4. #4
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    If one piston is free and the other stuck, you may need to clamp the free one in place and first remove the sticky one first. Although on a D, you can remove the pipe connecting the two halves and work on each piston separately. Don't get your fingers between two pistons as a piston that suddenly lets go with 60psi behind it can do you an injury! Ease the pressure up from a very low level until it moves. A pushbike pump might even be enough to shift it if it's not stuck. Late cars will have aluminum pistons instead of the earlier chromed items, so don't be surprised to see either type, but a mixture is probably not ideal.
    Last edited by David S; 27th January 2017 at 12:38 PM.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by David S View Post
    If one piston is free and the other stuck, you may need to clamp the free one in place and first remove the sticky one first. Although on a D, you can remove the pipe connecting the two halves and work on each piston separately. Don't get your fingers between two pistons as a piston that suddenly lets go with 60psi behind it can do you an injury! Ease the pressure up from a very low level until it moves. A pushbike pump might even be enough to shift it if it's not stuck. Late cars will have aluminum pistons instead of the earlier chromed items, so don't be surprised to see either type, but a mixture is probably not ideal.
    I removed the hydraulic pipe feed to one of the front suspension cylinders and screwed it into the caliper. Started the engine and as the pressure built the piston started to move and I shut the motor off. Worked like a charm.
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  6. #6
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    Thanks. I should have stated that the calipers are already out of the car and split into the two halves...

  7. #7
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    Both front brakes jammed on requiring all 4 pistons to be removed on my D. I took the main feed pipe from the regulator to brake accumulator and connected it to the calliper. Slackened the HP pump belt and span the pump by hand. The pistons came out very easily although you do tend to lose a lot of fluid this way though

  8. #8
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    I used the grease gun trick. You have to clean the mess up afterwards of course, parts washer or big bucket of petrol etc. I think I just stood on the separate calipers from memory and pumped like bejusuz.

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    Hi Guys,

    Any workshop you go to will use compressed air to remove the pistons from the calliper, especially on Citroens with LHM where they is no corrosion. There is no effort, and just a little LHM residue from inside the calliper. A handful of rag over the piston, the nozzle of an air gun into the LHM pipe hole, and if there is a second transfer hole, as in a 2CV or GS's a finger over that.

    Its out in seconds.

    Why would you muck around using grease guns and pumping the calliper full of grease is beyond me. What a mess, and then get your hands covered in petrol or whatever to clean it up.

    The same goes for using the hydraulic pump etc. Compressed air is so simple & clean.

    If you don't have some sort of compressor, then frankly you shouldn't be working on a car. They are a cheap as chips (you can buy one regularly at Aldi), and they are a necessity for most jobs on a car.

    Best regards,.

    Greg
    We Have:
    C5 HDI Exclusive 2.7 '09, Pluriel '09, Berlingo 1.6 HDI '10, C4 VTS coupe. C4 Picasso '08, 2CV Charleston '84 Grey, 2CV, '55 Australian delivered. 15/6 H '55, SM '74 BVM, DS21 EFI BVH, DS21 '67 BVH.
    We Had:
    1930C6F, '73 GS1220 wagon X 2, '75 G special, '75 GS panel van, '74 GS Birotor, '82 GSA panel van with factory AC, '85 CX25GTI BVM, 2002 C5 V6, 2006, C5 S2 HDI, '86 BX19GT, '72 DS21 BVM, '55 15/6H, '54 Lt 15,'73 Dyane, '82 Visa Super X, with Chrono Mecs & factory AC, 1972 SM.

  10. #10
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    I tried compressed air and it wasn't compressed enough so had to try alternative option.

    I GO to a workshop where I DO the work : )

    I also wanted to clean the outside crap off so no biggy either.

    But your suggestion is highly logical captain and no argument with that Greg.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg View Post
    Hi Guys,

    Any workshop you go to will use compressed air to remove the pistons from the calliper, especially on Citroens with LHM where they is no corrosion. There is no effort, and just a little LHM residue from inside the calliper. A handful of rag over the piston, the nozzle of an air gun into the LHM pipe hole, and if there is a second transfer hole, as in a 2CV or GS's a finger over that.

    Its out in seconds.

    Why would you muck around using grease guns and pumping the calliper full of grease is beyond me. What a mess, and then get your hands covered in petrol or whatever to clean it up.

    The same goes for using the hydraulic pump etc. Compressed air is so simple & clean.

    If you don't have some sort of compressor, then frankly you shouldn't be working on a car. They are a cheap as chips (you can buy one regularly at Aldi), and they are a necessity for most jobs on a car.

    Best regards,.

    Greg

    Compressed air is the first choice . but I have had many seized pistons ( mostly Renault 12 . 16 ) that would not move with 150 psi behind them . High air pressure means that the pistons comes out of the caliper with a lot of energy , can cause crushed fingers or lost pistons.
    When running a busy service dept I had a dedicated grease gun with a selection of threads to fit all calipers, it always worked well , then just put all the parts in the automatic parts washer and close the lid hit start button and make a cup of tea.
    What you dont have a hot parts washer , they are cheap from Hare & Forbes , really if you don't have some sort of parts washer , then frankly you shouldn't be working on a car.

    Andy
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    Wow, this is getting a bit judgemental. So just because some one doesn't have the money or space for a compressor or parts washer they can't join the club? It doesn't matter if they are only $10, if you only have $1 to spare you can't buy it.

    For years I used an old Ford crossflow sump to wash parts. It has a deep bit, a drainer and a drain plug. Now I use a 15 litre oil drain pan.

    If people are happy using a grease gun, more leverage to them.

    Many in the UK have to work in the road, hoping some bastard doesn't steal their tools when they go in for a piss. If they can park reasonably near their own house it's a bonus.

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    It reminds me of a guy at Wagga teacher's college (1970s) who lost his arm in a motorbike accident. He was kicked out of the teaching course. He was told as he didn't have two arms he couldn't be a teacher. He then started a successful business as a house painter!

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by badabec View Post
    Wow, this is getting a bit judgemental. So just because some one doesn't have the money or space for a compressor or parts washer they can't join the club? It doesn't matter if they are only $10, if you only have $1 to spare you can't buy it.

    For years I used an old Ford crossflow sump to wash parts. It has a deep bit, a drainer and a drain plug. Now I use a 15 litre oil drain pan.

    If people are happy using a grease gun, more leverage to them.

    Many in the UK have to work in the road, hoping some bastard doesn't steal their tools when they go in for a piss. If they can park reasonably near their own house it's a bonus.
    Luxury,
    What you own a house I walk 15 miles through crocodile infested dense bush to my hand dug pit, I use a shoebox for a parts washer and blow through a discarded Macdonalds straw for compressed air. . .

    Cheers
    Chris
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    Greg,
    unfortunately, there's one small problem with this assertion; in most instances, the reason that an LHM caliper on an A series Citroen needs stripping and rebuilding is because some eejit has dosed the braking system with 'universal' DOT 3/4 glycol-based brake fluid.

    Once the seals have swollen, I can assure you that the only way to shift those pistons is to use line pressure from the master cylinder or the grease gun approach.

    At a rough estimate, I'd think that at least 25% of UK-based A series cars may have been affected over the years, including the 'reverse [email protected]', where LHM had been added to a drum-braked car.
    Even in France, the same mistake has been made, since I've had to rebuild the entire brake system on several imported cars.


    "There is no effort, and just a little LHM residue from inside the calliper. A handful of rag over the piston, the nozzle of an air gun into the LHM pipe hole, and if there is a second transfer hole, as in a 2CV or GS's a finger over that.
    Its out in seconds."






  16. #16
    Fellow Frogger! Greg's Avatar
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    Hi All,

    Firstly, I thought this was a Citroen Forum, and the post was about DS callipers with LHM, but you guys never stick to the subject.

    You wander off on all sorts of tangents, mix other makes into the post, and then get you nickers in a knot when someone tries to straighten you out.

    I'm a licensed motor mechanic, and have worked on Citroen exclusively since the mid '70s. My reply was about LHM callipers and wheel cylinders only. If you reread my reply, I said especially on Citroens with LHM with no corrosion!

    I've had plenty of Traction wheel cylinders where they were so seized, you just buy new ones, but the post was not about Tractions, or early DS with LHS2, it was about removing the pistons from late DS LHM brake callipers! End of story

    Best regards,

    Greg
    forumnoreason likes this.
    We Have:
    C5 HDI Exclusive 2.7 '09, Pluriel '09, Berlingo 1.6 HDI '10, C4 VTS coupe. C4 Picasso '08, 2CV Charleston '84 Grey, 2CV, '55 Australian delivered. 15/6 H '55, SM '74 BVM, DS21 EFI BVH, DS21 '67 BVH.
    We Had:
    1930C6F, '73 GS1220 wagon X 2, '75 G special, '75 GS panel van, '74 GS Birotor, '82 GSA panel van with factory AC, '85 CX25GTI BVM, 2002 C5 V6, 2006, C5 S2 HDI, '86 BX19GT, '72 DS21 BVM, '55 15/6H, '54 Lt 15,'73 Dyane, '82 Visa Super X, with Chrono Mecs & factory AC, 1972 SM.

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    Hmm. As the originator of the thread I think I will now stay out of it...

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    If you don't have some sort of compressor, then frankly you shouldn't be working on a car. They are a cheap as chips (you can buy one regularly at Aldi), and they are a necessity for most jobs on a car.
    The above statement was off topic.

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    I'm not being argumentative over any of this (passive passive) but it was suggested to me to go the grease gun technique as with air it might shoot the piston out and if I didn't catch it result scored piston. Nobody mentioned the pipes in the clubs shed are so old a wise person decided to turn the air down to 100 so it didn't shred the pipes! someone tried to paint a D at 120psi before all this as a footnote and remarks were made regarding the 'quality' of the paintjob. Ah merdes et drole.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GreenBlood View Post
    Luxury,
    What you own a house I walk 15 miles through crocodile infested dense bush to my hand dug pit, I use a shoebox for a parts washer and blow through a discarded Macdonalds straw for compressed air. . .

    Cheers
    Chris
    You had a McDonald's thickshake. You lucky b%$*%^d!

    SF
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