Berlingo - cracked block - block sealer?
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Thread: Berlingo - cracked block - block sealer?

  1. #1
    Tadpole
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    Default Berlingo - cracked block - block sealer?

    Hi all

    I recently changed the head gasket on my 2002 KFW engine Berlingo (with much help from the kind people on this forum).

    After doing this I was still losing coolant. Actually it has had water in it for about six weeks while I have been trying to figure out where the leak was coming from (mostly due to a lack of time to get under the car and have a decent look).

    Whenever I stopped, water was dripping slowly (like a slowly leaking tap) from behind the oil filter housing. I was puzzled as to where this was coming from as it didn't seem to be near any hoses etc.

    i managed to heve a decent look yesterday, and when I was just about to give up I noticed something unfortunate. It seems that water is slowly seeping from an invisible crack in the block at the front of the engine (above the oil filter housing), beading on one of the ribs and then dropping. This seems to be the source of my leak.

    Unfortunately, I'm not in a position to replace the engine (especially given that I just replaced the head gasket). I probably want to squeeze another twelve months out of the van.

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    Is cooling system/block sealer a viable option?

    If so, I'd love some guidance on what to get...

    I'm assuming that if I continue driving and topping up without doing anything the problem will just get worse???

    Any opinions would be much appreciated.

    Michael

    Berlingo 2002
    1.4 KFW Engine

  2. #2
    1000+ Posts robmac's Avatar
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    You have nothing to loose, I'd give chemiweld a try.

    Chemiweld Radiator Stop Leak - 325mL - Supercheap Auto Australia
    shanadoo and jaahn like this.

  3. #3
    Tadpole
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    Thanks robmac.

    Googling, I noticed a product called K-Seal came up a lot too. I'm guessing that's due to good website SEO. It's about double the price...

    Has anyone else used Chemiweld or K-Seal?
    shanadoo likes this.

  4. #4
    Fellow Frogger
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    Chemiweld certainly works on a leaking water jacket. It does, however, likely still contain pellets in a brown sauce, so you have to be mindful of what that can do inside the engine. Stop Leak can also just end up in the bottom of the block doing nothing if it is just dumped in. If it's a minor leak, basic Bars Leak might do it. It's not expensive.

    Are you sure it's not weeping from a bolt that goes into the water jacket and that you forgot to seal or possibly from the head gasket and only forming bead further down the block?

  5. #5
    Too many posts! JohnW's Avatar
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    Retighten head bolts?

    Equally, blind bolt holes with fluid inside?????

    I'd start reversible, i.e. Bars Leaks. As Robmac observed, not much to lose if indeed it is cracked.
    JohnW

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  6. #6
    Tadpole
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    Thanks David and John

    I'm not sure, so I will take a closer look. It does seem to coming directly from the block.

    is it possible to attach video in this forum? I only half know what I'm talking about!

  7. #7
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    That clear stuff with the coppery filings in it is good too,better to start with clean water in the system ,a couple of worm up and cool down cycles can be beneficial ,as pressure can sometimes blow the sealer out ,mostly if the crack is large ,small crack you should be able to start it up and watch it stem the flow, pugs .,ps i ran a car for a couple of years with this stuff in it
    shanadoo likes this.

  8. #8
    Tadpole
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    Thank you all

    i will try some stop leak and report back.

  9. #9
    Fellow Frogger
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnW View Post
    Retighten head bolts? ...
    A good point to consider about the rebuild work. While torquing correctly is very important, it's just as important that the bolts were measured before re-using them and that they met the maximum allowed length. These bolts are designed to be 'TTY' (Torque To Yield) fasteners and you are tightening them to a point in the plastic zone of the materials and where they 'yield' and elongate permanently.
    See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torque-to-yield_fastener
    The torquing procedure will be a two stage job and sometimes there is a final, say, 45 degree, angle tightening step to finish it off.
    If it's somehow not as tight as it should be, the head gasket may not last as long as it should and might even be the cause of the leak if it's not shown to be a cracked or porous block.
    UFO likes this.

  10. #10
    UFO
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    Quote Originally Posted by David S View Post
    A good point to consider about the rebuild work. While torquing correctly is very important, it's just as important that the bolts were measured before re-using them and that they met the maximum allowed length. These bolts are designed to be 'TTY' (Torque To Yield) fasteners and you are tightening them to a point in the plastic zone of the materials and where they 'yield' and elongate permanently.
    See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torque-to-yield_fastener
    The torquing procedure will be a two stage job and sometimes there is a final, say, 45 degree, angle tightening step to finish it off.
    If it's somehow not as tight as it should be, the head gasket may not last as long as it should and might even be the cause of the leak if it's not shown to be a cracked or porous block.
    And that last 45 degrees can be quite a heave on the bar.
    Craig K
    2009 C5 HDi Exclusive

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