DS maintenance.
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Thread: DS maintenance.

  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger! mberry's Avatar
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    Default DS maintenance.

    When it comes to regular maintenance on the DS, I confess, I have always been a bit in the dark. I always thought there was some magic that happened when you dropped your car off at the garage. Having taken charge of these tasks myself for a, a very long time, I'm only now feeling confident that I have everything covered off............ As I type that I'm am pretty sure plenty will be able to think of things that I have missed.
    Only this week, I accidentally left the car running in the garage when I arrived at work, I was distracted when I arrived.
    It wasn't until half an hour later that I received a call to tell me the girls in the downstairs office were being slowly asphyxiated, KINDLY TURN THE CAR OFF, I replied. Then later, without giving it anymore thought, I jumped in the car and drove home for lunch.
    The car barely made it the 2 kms home coughing and spluttering all the way up Chapel street. I guess I have burnt out the points, I thought. So I replaced the points and the capacitor. No problem, car ran fine on the trip back to the office, but I knew I hadn't set the gap very carefully, just assumed I would sort it later. When I did set it all up properly that night, I was amazed at the result. Just found what feels like another 25% more power.

    The point of all this is, no one ever showed me or told me what to do with DS maintenance, I never asked, for fear of exposing myself as a fraud when it came to things Citroen.
    I use the factory lube and maintenance chart, which is great, but there are many other aspects that are not included. I'm going to have a go a the definitive maintenance chart. Unless of course one already exists, and I have been in the dark for the last 30 years.

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    Fellow Frogger!
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    Congratulations
    Welcome to the mid 20th century
    I am amazed at qualified mechanics that have no idea of how to tune carburettors and replace an set points and condensers in classic cars
    Hint: if the distributor comes out easily take it out to set the points
    After noting its position relative to the block

  3. #3
    Fellow Frogger! Middlemoon.1's Avatar
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    It's a very relaxing and pleasurable thing, spending a couple of hours servicing a D. And then noticing the changes and improvement when you do the test drive. Call it 'slow' motoring if you want. Should be more of it. Good for the blood pressure and good therapy!

    Tim

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sherman View Post
    Congratulations
    Welcome to the mid 20th century
    I am amazed at qualified mechanics that have no idea of how to tune carburettors and replace an set points and condensers in classic cars
    Hint: if the distributor comes out easily take it out to set the points
    After noting its position relative to the block
    ... and be careful of the change to the timing setting about 1970. There's a difference of about 10 degrees in the peg position. It's explained in the manual.

    Other than the hydraulics and some of the DS specifics, servicing a D should fall back upon quite basic mechanical training.

    Without wanting to start an oil war ... the later oil formulations like SL, SM may have lower anti-wear additives that older oils of the same viscosity have. As one example, Penrite's HPR30 claims to have 'Full zinc'.

  5. #5
    1000+ Posts Greg C's Avatar
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    I love servicing my CX. I never have felt it go any better after a service and if it did I would be worried. This would mean I have not given the car the attention it needed. Especially when a car is not used as much as in the past, servicing needs to be more meticulous. I was picked up when my daughter complained the rear door locks were very stiff. Oops, a bit of spray lube all over the hinges and door locks got it back to normal. Now to fix the courtesy light switches.
    Mine

    CX Prestige
    Toyota Prius

    In the family

    Xantia SX

  6. #6
    Too many posts! JohnW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sherman View Post
    Congratulations
    Welcome to the mid 20th century
    I am amazed at qualified mechanics that have no idea of how to tune carburettors and replace an set points and condensers in classic cars
    Hint: if the distributor comes out easily take it out to set the points
    After noting its position relative to the block
    There's so much to be said for dispensing with points and capacitor altogether. Go for a "Hot Spark" kit or similar with a Hall Effect magnetic switch instead. They really are "set and forget". Then there's a 123 distributor, better again but rather more expensive.
    JohnW

    Renault 4CV 1951
    Renault R8 1965
    Renault Scenic 2005 (wife's)
    Renault Scenic 2007 (mine)
    Renault Scenic 2006 (daughter's)
    CitroŽn CX Pallas 1980

    National Co-ordinator, Renault 4CV Register of Australia

  7. #7
    Now go make me a sandwich Hotrodelectric's Avatar
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    It ain't nothing but a thing. We all gotta start somewhere. I didn't know a damn thing about electrical until I got tied up with a friend's Willys wagon too many years ago. I wasn't too sharp on Citroen D electrical until Wally tossed me under the bus at Rendezvous 6 years ago- and I'm still learning! The whole upshot is this- NEVER be ashamed to ask for help. A dumb question is always easier to fix than a dumb mistake.

    Congratulations
    Welcome to the mid 20th century
    I am amazed at qualified mechanics that have no idea of how to tune carburettors and replace an set points and condensers in classic cars
    Hint: if the distributor comes out easily take it out to set the points
    After noting its position relative to the block


    Think about it Sherman. How many cars do you see today with the "traditional" technologies? You can't really blame today's techs. They're not schooled in how to set up a Weber dual side draft. They're schooled in how to read a scanner telling them to replace "X" module or component. The people who can tune a carburetted, points ignition car are dying out, and almost nobody to replace them. Even streetrods and the like- what was a bastion of "old school" wrenching- has become more modern with injection and module this and controller that, and digital everything.

    I don't know what the answer will be, except that people like us- like MBerry- take an interest in learning for themselves.
    mberry and robmac like this.
    The measure of your character isn't what you do when people are watching- it's what you do when they aren't watching.

  8. #8
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    Oldtimer mechanic to colleague around mid-20th century ...
    These young kiddies couldn't even adjust a trembler, let alone align acetylene lamps.
    ScotFrog likes this.

  9. #9
    1000+ Posts robmac's Avatar
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    adjust a trembler
    And the meaning may indeed be different for them.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by David S View Post
    Oldtimer mechanic to colleague around mid-20th century ...
    These young kiddies couldn't even adjust a trembler, let alone align acetylene lamps.
    But as an official "older bloke" .. who cut his teeth on a Traction, and conventional the rusty points and coil cast iron age cars ... didn't M. Citroen teach us a lot !
    Andre's men taught us about hydraulics, fluid chemistry ( where else have you seen the word "miscible" except here ?), reading hydraulic schemas ans circuit diagrams and plain old METRIC spanners. Hydropneumatic needs and care, fuel injection and the wonders of metal fatigue and heat sink, brittle rubber, inaccessability, lost bark, dirty fingernails and oil bathed air cleaners, unsealed batteries, delamination, and most of all LEAKS !! of every description.
    Now my leaks are of a more organic ( not orgasmic ) origin.
    Hotrodelectric likes this.

  11. #11
    Now go make me a sandwich Hotrodelectric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fritzelhund View Post
    But as an official "older bloke" .. who cut his teeth on a Traction, and conventional the rusty points and coil cast iron age cars ... didn't M. Citroen teach us a lot !
    Andre's men taught us about hydraulics, fluid chemistry ( where else have you seen the word "miscible" except here ?), reading hydraulic schemas ans circuit diagrams and plain old METRIC spanners. Hydropneumatic needs and care, fuel injection and the wonders of metal fatigue and heat sink, brittle rubber, inaccessability, lost bark, dirty fingernails and oil bathed air cleaners, unsealed batteries, delamination, and most of all LEAKS !! of every description.
    Now my leaks are of a more organic ( not orgasmic ) origin.
    Now you're just describing an average weekend for most of us.
    The measure of your character isn't what you do when people are watching- it's what you do when they aren't watching.

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    Fellow Frogger! mberry's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=Hotrodelectric;1387602]A dumb question is always easier to fix than a dumb mistake.

    Gold, I'm using that in the office already, lol.

  13. #13
    Now go make me a sandwich Hotrodelectric's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=mberry;1387738]
    Quote Originally Posted by Hotrodelectric View Post
    A dumb question is always easier to fix than a dumb mistake.

    Gold, I'm using that in the office already, lol.
    Oh, my, that's a mantra. The alternative is "A dumb question is cheaper to fix than a dumb mistake".
    forumnoreason likes this.
    The measure of your character isn't what you do when people are watching- it's what you do when they aren't watching.

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