restoring cylinder head 1.4L C3. advice & which spring compressor?
  • Register
  • Help
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    ccc
    ccc is offline
    Member ccc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    brisbane
    Posts
    113

    Default restoring cylinder head 1.4L C3. advice & which spring compressor?

    Hi
    Have taken off the cylinder head and have been quoted $240 to skim the face of the head and pressure test the valves. $90 just to skim and $520 for a complete overhaul.

    As it only has 120,000km on it and it looks ok, am thinking of removing the valves to lap them in as there is a little bit of carbon around them. Would also remove the camshaft. Also replace the valve stem seals.
    Could people who have experiance on this please advise of any tips.. eg which valve spring compressor worked ok. Did the engine give no problems afterwards.
    thanks

    Advertisement

  2. #2
    Fellow Frogger!
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    brisbane Au
    Posts
    927

    Default

    Why did you take off the head.
    What makes you think it needs resurfacing.
    Carbon on the valves indicates wrong fuel or oil burning issues.

  3. #3
    Fellow Frogger
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    9,670

    Default

    You want a regular C-shaped compressor as you'd find at almost any auto parts store. Most of them have adjustment to allow for different diameter valve spring retainers. Take precautions to avoid scratching the head face. I've always preferred a large G-clamp and a piece of tube with two sides cut away. It's a little hairy, but it gives you infinite adjustment. Plenty of online options too.

    Maybe, check the face with a straight edge before doing more. If you turn the cam over, you can get some idea of how the valve seats are.

    Have a look at your head gasket and see if you can find the point at which it failed. Sometimes, you find erosion on the top face of the liner if there's been a problem for some time. In such a case, you may need another liner before going further.

  4. #4
    Fellow Frogger! JAJEA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Essendon
    Posts
    648

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by shanadoo View Post
    Why did you take off the head.
    What makes you think it needs resurfacing.
    Carbon on the valves indicates wrong fuel or oil burning issues.
    Regretfully "ccc" I would have to agree with Shanadoo: why?. At 120K kms , it should be just about run in unless it has a shit of previous owner(s). May we assume that it has "blown" a head gasket? And what problems gave rise to a blown head gasket?

    To answer your question - it depends on how long you want it to last in your possession?

    Regards JAJEA

  5. #5
    1000+ Posts Ken W's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    North Brisbane
    Posts
    1,893

    Default

    if you read the other ccc thread with the picture of the head gasket, there is some story about oil leaks into coolant. I have seen coolant leaks running down the block from a headgasket - thanks bars leaks. Also they all seem to start to leak oil at the cambelt end after ten years that comes from the oil passage from the block to the head that runs close by.

    Cheers, Ken W

  6. #6
    ccc
    ccc is offline
    Member ccc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    brisbane
    Posts
    113

    Default

    Have replaced the head gasket with a Payen one. 1.25mm thick.
    Assisted by the template holding owner.
    The head re conditioning work was done at SSCH Southside Cylinder Head Service, ERA Engine Reconditioning Australia and am very happy with the service. Will be going back for the 2.5L V6 Alfa's heads.
    4 thousand of a inch head grind (there was no warp but it cleaned the surface well, would be nice to have the exhaust manifold surface done too)
    Had the exhaust valves cleaned and lapped in and installed and all valve stem seals inserted (seals supplied from vrs kit). A clear adhesive seemed to have been used installing the seals. There was flame like sooting behind the seat of the exhaust valves and 'scale' on the seat suggesting that it wasn't sealing when closed.
    The camshaft seal was replaced by ssch also. (i didnt want to score or scratch the head trying to get the seal out myself.). The camshaft came back with a white grease in all bearings.

    The cost was ok, a lot less than another firms quote. I removed the valves beforehand and installed the inlet valves at home.
    A valve spring compressor doesn't need to be bought to remove the valves. The method is:

    Using the open end of a large spanner eg 19 mm. Grip the spanner with 2 hands and push down the the valve retainer with the open end of the spanner flat on and encompassing the colletts. Lean in using bodyweight.
    To keep the valve stationary on its seat, put a tennis ball or balled up rag under the valve.
    As the valve retainer depresses your off sider tweezers or flicks out the colletts as the load is taken off the collett.
    Installation is the reverse.

    Head bolts are tightened in 3 goes.
    1st to 20Nm bolts 1 to 10.
    2nd A 120 degree angle turn bolts 1 - 10.
    3. Another 120 degree angle turn bolts 1 - 10.

    Have attached pics of the cardboard template used to tighten the head bolts thru 120 degrees.

    To make the cardboard template:
    Use a radius the same length as the tool being used. An old torque wrench as a bar works ok.
    Unfold a cardboard box from the green grocers and draw the 120 angle using a protractor.
    To draw the circle or arc a round bird cage base who's radius was close to the length of the torque wrench was used. Have a scout around, something will fit.

    To check if your template is 120 degrees. Use it as a template on cement and
    draw a peace sign with it.
    If its 120 degrees it will form a circle. At the apex of the template cut out round notch that will be held against the socket or its extension as its tightened. About a 5 cent sized notch.

    To use the template the offsider holds the template in position, bracing their arms against the car so it doesn't move as you are turning the 120 degrees. Take up the load with wrench but don't turn yet. Align the start edge of the cardboard with the wrench handle. (A practice swing is a good idea at this time to check the offsider isnt in the way. Click the ratchet over on the wrench to do this.)
    Holding the template still, turn the wrench thru the 120 degrees, tightening the bolt, until it is aligned with the other straight side of the template.
    cheers
    restoring cylinder head 1.4L C3. advice & which spring compressor?-start-120-deg.jpgrestoring cylinder head 1.4L C3. advice & which spring compressor?-notch-details.jpgrestoring cylinder head 1.4L C3. advice & which spring compressor?-template-start-120.jpg
    Last edited by ccc; 14th September 2015 at 09:17 PM.

  7. #7
    ccc
    ccc is offline
    Member ccc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    brisbane
    Posts
    113

    Default

    Hi Jajea.
    The composite material in the old gasket didnt stand up to the job. There wasnt any corrosion and the car was well maintained by the previous owner.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •