2CV Michelin tyres best place to buy
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Thread: 2CV Michelin tyres best place to buy

  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Default 2CV Michelin tyres best place to buy

    Hi there all, I was recently advised by Jason Hantos that I should start to think of getting new types for my 2CV.

    He suggested Nankang, and I know many use these on 2CV, but I want only Michelin, as I don't drive the car a lot and really love original touches like French branded tyres on a French car. I know there other brands around.

    Does anyone one have any leads where they can be sourced for a reasonable cost and I know they are expensive.

    The he ones on the car I purchased from TORCU Tyres at Greenacre in the late 90's for about $90 a tyre. I would expect that figure to be double by now.

    During the the cars restoration, I purchased most parts through Peter Foselius in France, and suspect I might be told to contact him. He is great and I would not hesitate to get more stuff through him but interested to see if there are other options.

    Chris M

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    JBN
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    The best tyres for a 2CV on bitumen are the Michelin X. Nankangs are about the only tyre you can buy in Australia that are 135 X 15. They are cheaper (last cost me $120 each) and they are a better tyre for stony outback roads (ie Raid conditions).


    I bought four new Michelin X - 125 X 15 from Longstone Tyres in the UK a few years ago. They were doing a special of buy 4 tyres, have them shipped to Australia for free. They advertised through Aussie Frogs and many took them up on the offer for their classical Michelin tyres for D's, CX's and 2CVs.

    Check with Viking. I believe he is sending a container to Australia later this year with stuff for Raid 2016. I expect he could include a set of tyres for a better transport costing if you can wait.

    John

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    Hi Chris,

    Michelin are bringing their "classic" range into Australia again now (as of only one or two months ago) so there must be a Sydney specialist dealer who can get and fit them. Down here we have Stuckey Tyres and I am sure I have seen an advert from someone in Brisbane as well.

    The new local pricing is still a little above what you can import them for but with the $AUD dropping every week, plus local availability and fitting, I think you should look for a local supplier.

    I'd be very surprised if your "X" tyres were not part of the new imports.

    regards, Leconte
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    John and Leconte, thanks and both great suggestions. Shall explore both. Would be great to have a new set of four on the baby. Chris

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    JBN
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    If you search this forum for Longstone Tyres you will find a thread called that written by Dougal, the owner in 2014.
    It has his web address and phone number and it would be worth getting a quote. With either Longstone or 2CViking,
    the absence of VAT helps towards the freight.

    John

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    Tyre Plus Caringbah was able to get Michelins for our GS's. Give John a call. I am sure he will be able to help you.
    Regards,

    Garth.


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    Guys thanks.

    will chase.

    Have been drooling all night with a MEHARI-2CV CASSIS magazine.

    All parts readily available.

    Website Pièces détachées 2CV et Méhari - Vaste choix de pièces auto

    they seem to have a modern showroom of "new" cars. Amazing. Chris

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    current unique cars mag has advertorial for Stuckey with a 2cv pictured, so ...

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    JBN
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    Quote Originally Posted by qmusic View Post
    Guys thanks.

    will chase.

    Have been drooling all night with a MEHARI-2CV CASSIS magazine.

    All parts readily available.

    Website Pièces détachées 2CV et Méhari - Vaste choix de pièces auto

    they seem to have a modern showroom of "new" cars. Amazing. Chris
    Club Cassis brought out a new late model dual throat carby. They probably had it made in India. Remember, Club Cassis inherited all the Citroen 2CV parts and perhaps some tooling and certainly the design specs. Consequently, virtually all parts for 2CVs are available.

    My problem in dealing with them direct is that they wouldn't accept MasterCard, but would accept a cheque (in Aussie Dollars???). They tend to speak with thick French accents and perhaps the thickness extends further.
    The way around it was to get Viking to get it from them and send it to me with other bits a pieces I regularly get from him.

    John

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    Is the new double throat that much different?
    I know that the new resin coil and a fresh set of points
    makes it start up hot straight away
    first key touch ,
    so thanks for that

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    Thanks again John.

    They have a tyre that looks exactly like a Michelin currently on my car, labelled PNEU or something like that. Possibly their own brand. I think with wheel and tyre each piece was about 93 EUROs which seems very reasonable.

    having issues with credit cards is a pain in the butt but I will contact Viking and see if he can supply. Chris

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    I had Mabor on mine and they were perfectly fine. A less known brand by Continental Corporation Germany was stamped with; "Made in France"

    Not sure if you can still get these.


    Adrian

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    John & I have had a discussion on the topic of the 125/80-15 X & alternatives before but to just flag an, as yet unmentioned) alternative, I suggest the Continental EcoContact EP in 145/65-15 (early Smart fronts).

    I suggest that, as a tyre, it is superior to all of the above in crispness & wet grip. That said, John's view, as I recall it, is that it would be unsuited to the 2CV given its adoption of +ve camber in corners.

    He hasn't tried the tyres & I haven't tried the 2CV (although I have many years of experience of fanging rear-engined Renaults with swing axle rear suspensions (which move to +ve camber under lateral load) & a vast suite of tyre & wheel combinations (including unfond memories of 135/8O-15 X & ZX& 145/80 XZX).

    I note, though, that the Conti is hardly mega-wide, has a not overly shorter sidewall height (equal to that of a 115/80-15) &, although crisper in its sidewall than the X, ZX & XZX, it is hardly a track-day special incapable of the degree of sidewall distortion & tread migration that a positively cambering wheel requires to avoid climbing onto the tread edge overmuch.

    My own surmise is that, were someone to actually try them, they would be rewarded by a transformation in grip & responsiveness.

    My comments are, of course, aimed only at those who would be willing to fit non-Michelin tyres.

    cheers! Peter
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    JBN
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    I would not use 145 tyres on a 2CV. Too heavy. Good suspension is about reducing unsprung weight, not increasing it. And on a day like today (snow at Berrima and Hume Highway closed for a while), 145 are vastly inferior to 125 for snow. The 125 finds traction in 4" of snow because of its skinniness, not that that is such a factor in Australia. I would prefer the 125 to 145 in serious wet conditions as they don't aquaplane being so skinny.

    John

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    Quote Originally Posted by JBN View Post
    I would not use 145 tyres on a 2CV. Too heavy. Good suspension is about reducing unsprung weight, not increasing it. And on a day like today (snow at Berrima and Hume Highway closed for a while), 145 are vastly inferior to 125 for snow. The 125 finds traction in 4" of snow because of its skinniness, not that that is such a factor in Australia. I would prefer the 125 to 145 in serious wet conditions as they don't aquaplane being so skinny.

    John
    Um, certainly a factor in good suspension design is reducing unsprung weight. So, other things being equal, it's a good thing. But: other things are not equal & sometimes it's worth trading off that virtue for others (otherwise rally cars, which are indeed interested in suspension performance over uneven surfaces, would have narrower tyres than they do). For a car that is mainly driven on tarmac roads of no great bumpiness, the importance of a low unsprung/sprung mass ratio is of less importance. In any event, the 145/65 is hardly hugely heavy.

    Wet roads? I think that you are wrong in your analysis. There are two scenarios of interest: one is streaming wet roads (especially at a fairly high speed); the other is merely slick roads.

    Consider the first. The tyre has two tasks to perform: get its "rubber" in contact with the road surface & have that "rubber" engage with that surface. The first task is primarily (not totally) a tread pattern story & the second is primarily (not totally) a "rubber" compound story. Other things being equal, a tyre with greater ground pressure than another has a better chance of performing each of these tasks. But, again, other things are not equal. The X has mediocre longitudinal drainage & a relatively poor compound for wet conditions. The Conti is far superior in both matters. The issue of longitudinal drainage may not matter much at 2CV speeds unless deep water (a puddle in a dip, say) is encountered but the Conti is going to be superior, not inferior (even on a vehicle as light as a 2CV).

    To the possible cry: 'you've never dviven a 2CV in the wet' I would respond that no, I haven't but, as earlier noted in part, I have driven rear-engined Renaults very quickly indeed in the wet over 50 years. These cars have very light front ends & a tendency to tight-corner understeer cum slide & to locking fronts under braking in the wet. I have had each front end behaviour vastly improved in the wet simply by moving from various narrow (& earlier mentioned) Michelins to 165/70 or 165/65 -14 front tyres (currently Conti EcoContact3 or PremiumContact2). My spares for my current 4CV, R8 (& Djet) are the above-recommended 145/65-15 & last year I had cause to fit a pair to the front of my R8 while some 14" wheels were being fettled. They were good when I experimented with their limits under braking & cornering on some favourite roads. Certainly far superior to my Michelins of old but, despite being narrower, they were inferior to my 165/65 or 70 normal fitments. Some of this experimentation was in heavy rain (not just merely slick roads) & all of it was on uneven "C" roads.I mention all of this to allay any point that my argument is but theoretical - in any event, without theory, practice is blind but I here cite relevant practice as well.

    I mentioned two scenarios; the second (& more common wet driving situation) is merely slick roads. In these conditions, the pattern is of less importance than the compound (which is why some high land/sea ratio "track day" tyres are very good in such conditions). What one wants is a compound of sufficient distortability to interlock with the small peaks & troughs of the road surface. The Conti has a more suitable compound for this than the Michelin (& my point allows that the X would not have the same compounding as that of past ones).

    Again, try the 145/65 Conti fitment; I predict a pleasant surprise but, if I'm wrong, at worst, the result would be mild disappointment, not disaster.

    cheers! Peter

    (Incidentally, I have no tribal loyalty to Continental or antipathy to Michelin: I have fitted a vast range of tyre brands & types to my vehicles over the decades & one highlight was Michelin's MXF; I would also never recommend Continental's current ComfortContact 5).

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    JBN
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    All good theory with which I agree. However, you obviously haven't driven 2CVs which basically do everything completely opposite to any other car. The 2CV probably had the longest gestation period for its design (ie the Second World War where the originators had nothing to do but mentally rework the design for 5 or 6 years). The fact that the design remained basically unchanged for over 40 years and 4 million vehicles speaks for the success of that design.

    Except for people like Harley, I would not tempt to stray from the very successful original formula. Remember the original problem was to just shod a 2CV. Using the original rims, that allows 125 or 135 tyres. With wider tyres come changes in rims. KISS.

    John

    I run Continental ComfortContact 5's on my Xantia. I have had good experiences in the wet with them (much better than similarly priced Yokohamas). I don't experiment with brands. If I am happy with the tyres (price and performance) I replace with the same. Any tyres always feel better new than the old ones that need replacing. I came to the Continental V's Yokohama comparison by having two identical BXs, one shod with Yokos and the other with Contis. Over the two years that they were on the cars, I never liked the Yokos in the way they pointed into corners. Hence the bias to Continentals. I have never been able to compare tyres like and like except for my two 2CVs. However they are not identical in that the town car (Michelin X) has "bateurs" (inertial shock absorbers) on the front and different shock absorbers (Boge) to the bush car which has cheap Nankangs (albeit with a good tread pattern) and the suspension is at its maximum recommended height.

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    Of course I obviously haven't driven a 2CV; I explicitly stated that!?! So what? My points are unaffected by this.

    As far as I can see, the only substantive responses are that the current formula is very successful & that nothing over 135 fits on the standard rims anyway. I have indeed been under the impression that the standard rims are 4". If so, then 145/65 is fine on that width; if they are just 3.5", then 145/65 is unsuitable and I withdraw my suggestion. As for the "things are fine, change nothing" point, things can be fine but if they can easily be better, why not make them so? The KISS maxim is hardly transgressed by a simple tyre change (assuming that that is all that is involved).

    cheers! Peter

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