ID19 manual steering
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Thread: ID19 manual steering

  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger! marc61's Avatar
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    Default ID19 manual steering

    I am looking at a good 1966 ID with LHS2 but it's got manual steering. Was wondering is it straightforward to convert to power steering. I can see myself getting hold of a power steering rack, but what else will be required?

    Also makes me think if I'm going to do that, it might be worth switching to LHM and work my way through the whole system seal by seal. Has anyone done that, any advice appreciated.

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    Cheers

    Marc
    Cheers, Marc.

    1987 CX GTi T2 Maikonics
    1972 SM 2.7 carb
    1972 DS21 EFI

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    Fellow Frogger! Rally's Avatar
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    I had an ID19 with manual steering . it was far to heavy for the wife to drive.
    To solve the problem I fitted a LHM power steering rack ,the shorter relay arms , belt driven 5 piston pump and a LHM resivior .
    I left the brakes and suspension running the origional LHS from the cam shaft driven single piston pump
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    Fellow Frogger! marc61's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rally View Post
    I had an ID19 with manual steering . it was far to heavy for the wife to drive.
    To solve the problem I fitted a LHM power steering rack ,the shorter relay arms , belt driven 5 piston pump and a LHM resivior .
    I left the brakes and suspension running the origional LHS from the cam shaft driven single piston pump
    That's an interesting way of doing it! A lot quicker than changing all the seals I bet. Did you have to make a different camshaft pulley to drive the pump?
    Cheers, Marc.

    1987 CX GTi T2 Maikonics
    1972 SM 2.7 carb
    1972 DS21 EFI

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    BVH Roger Wilkinson's Avatar
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    Good LHS power steering racks are hard to find. Rally's solution seems the simplest, though you would also need a pressure regulator and main accumulator. You also have to change the steering wheel (smaller diameter, different fitting where it engages rack).

    Roger

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    BVH Roger Wilkinson's Avatar
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    If you keep the manual steering, having plenty of tread on the front tyres and high pressure in them helps. I had a 1963 ID19 with manual steering for a few years and that was my solution.

    Roger

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    Fellow Frogger! marc61's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Wilkinson View Post
    Good LHS power steering racks are hard to find. Rally's solution seems the simplest, though you would also need a pressure regulator and main accumulator. You also have to change the steering wheel (smaller diameter, different fitting where it engages rack).

    Roger
    Must admit I find Rally's option pretty encouraging as I've got lots of spare LHM bits already. Thanks for the advice, feel more inclined to give this ID a thorough look over now.
    Cheers, Marc.

    1987 CX GTi T2 Maikonics
    1972 SM 2.7 carb
    1972 DS21 EFI

  8. #8
    Fellow Frogger! Rally's Avatar
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    My solution of a LHM steering rack was considered , as I was wrecking a later model DS due to rust,
    Just a matter of swaping all the bits over .
    The second resiviour for the LHM gave the engine bay a unique look.
    Not a hard job to do , finished in a day .
    Peugeot 504 Rally car V6
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  9. #9
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Take the car for a drive with it's manual steered rack. I don't mind them without power steering. They are nowhere near as bad as the non-power steered CX's.

    If your wifes anything like mine, she probably won't want to drive it anyway

    seeya,
    Shane L.
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    Fellow Frogger! caparobertsan's Avatar
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    Yes not bad as long as i don t go to shop car park or metropolitan area
    1961 Citroen ID19(2010~), Holden Frontera(R.I.P 2002-2014), Honda Accord EURO(2006~)

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    they're fairly light as far as armstrong steered old cars go in my opinion!
    As Roger said, good tyres at decent pressure makes a huge difference.

  12. #12
    1000+ Posts George 1/8th's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by badabec View Post
    Great alternative suggestion badabec.

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    1000+ Posts gerrypro's Avatar
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    I Drove a 6H for many years and the wife had no problem steering the car. Waaay heavier than an ID19. The trick is to turn the wheel when the car is slowly rolling. Turning a stationary wheel requires much more effort!
    !D 19s are getting to be rare beasts. It would be a shame to corrupt the original design brief of a simplified DS.

    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleChevron View Post
    Take the car for a drive with it's manual steered rack. I don't mind them without power steering. They are nowhere near as bad as the non-power steered CX's.

    If your wifes anything like mine, she probably won't want to drive it anyway

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    Cheers Gerry

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    Fellow Frogger! Middlemoon.1's Avatar
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    I loved the steering on my ID. If the correct tyres are well-inflated, front end is properly lubed and maintained, it is crisp, positive and responsive. The big white wheel is a fabulous and distinctive feature. Reverse-parking is greatly assisted by the car's geometry and broad front track. Heavy steering on an unknown car could be down to a variety of things that might not be normal.

    Tim

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    Fellow Frogger! marc61's Avatar
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    Think I'd better go and have a drive in it then. Stopping the wife driving it could be an incentive!

    I noticed its got what look like XAS tyres on the front and Michelin X tyres on the rear. Is that correct, I'd always thought XAS were on the 5 stud wheels and that earlier D's should have X's all round?
    Cheers, Marc.

    1987 CX GTi T2 Maikonics
    1972 SM 2.7 carb
    1972 DS21 EFI

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    Fellow Frogger! Middlemoon.1's Avatar
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    Hi, I'm guessing that the 66 would have the five stud with the later tyre. But there are interesting transition cars around this time in Australia at least. This would definitely be all around. The Michelin X tyre is on the single stud wheels. Let's face it, if you've got a chance to get a decent ID, grab it!

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    Too many posts! JohnW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marc61 View Post
    Think I'd better go and have a drive in it then. Stopping the wife driving it could be an incentive!

    I noticed its got what look like XAS tyres on the front and Michelin X tyres on the rear. Is that correct, I'd always thought XAS were on the 5 stud wheels and that earlier D's should have X's all round?
    My Renault 16 experience suggests high tyre pressures, the narrowest tread you are allowed and new tyres was the best for steering weight.
    JohnW

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    I seem to recall that when I replaced the ancient Michelin X on my ID19 with new ones the steering was transformed. Stopped squealing too. Only time when the steering effort was really noticeable was in multi-story car parks, and as the long wheelbase is not suited to such venues I learnt to stay away.
    roger

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    Fellow Frogger! deesse's Avatar
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    In my experience replacing old tyres with new on a DS also reduces the steering effort.
    cheers Tony

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    I drove a 1961 Citroen 1D19 for over five years and never felt the need for power steering. However, before that I owned a Citroen Big 6 and that had heavy steering. Currently I own a 2000 model Citroen Berlingo with over 210,000 km on the clock and the steering in this vehicle is still pin point sharp, light and accurate. (It is power assisted)

  21. #21
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    I've got one 2 ID19's here ... one with manual steering and one with a powered rack. Both the same vintage, same tires same drivetrain. Your welcome to try them both (the ugly pink one with the power steering drives waaaayyy better). Not due to the power steering, due to the lack of wear in it's mechanical components.

    You buy DS's/ID's not by the specification, but by the amount of rust in them. If it's not rusty, it's the one to buy. specification doesn't matter at all!

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    'Cit' homepage:
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    Proper cars--
    '85 Series II CX2500 GTi Turbo I
    '63 ID19 http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/showthread.php?t=90325
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas (last looked at ... about 15years ago)
    '78 GS1220 pallas
    '92 Range Rover Classic ... 5spd manual.

    Yay ... No Slugomatics


    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual

  22. #22
    Now go make me a sandwich Hotrodelectric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marc61 View Post
    Think I'd better go and have a drive in it then. Stopping the wife driving it could be an incentive!

    I noticed its got what look like XAS tyres on the front and Michelin X tyres on the rear. Is that correct, I'd always thought XAS were on the 5 stud wheels and that earlier D's should have X's all round?
    Not technically correct. The XAS came out in I think '70. However, your car is a '66, so it would be the first of the 380mm wheels, as opposed to 400mm for '65 and before. Your pair of XAS isn't a shock because of fitment, it's more of a surprise because they haven't rotted away yet!!

    Yes, I am aware you can buy (incredibly expensive) reproductions.
    The measure of your character isn't what you do when people are watching- it's what you do when they aren't watching.

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