C5 x7 front brake pad renewal.
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Thread: C5 x7 front brake pad renewal.

  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger! tasie C5's Avatar
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    Default C5 x7 front brake pad renewal.

    About to replace to front pads on the C5. When the rears were done, the caliper/pads could not be removed until the lip on the rotor was ground off. The brake hydraulics were not disconnected. Will the same problem occur with the fronts? Are the front pistons the screw in type like the rears?

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    Allan.

  2. #2
    1000+ Posts Ken W's Avatar
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    Alan,

    Following is a response I did for Craig (UFO) when he asked the question about discs and pad replacement on a C5X7.

    I have replaced front brake pads but not done discs yet. I bought my pads on ebay from Mick's Garage in Ireland and when they sent the shipping details, they included a link to a youtube video on how to fit them - very reassuring.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EpZxHyGqkBM

    There are a few points to mention though. After you take the plastic caps off and then undo the hex bolts holding the caliper on, there is a tendency for the rubber sleeve to turn and come with them. If this happens, try to persuade them to stay in place as it is quite a bit easier than getting them back in once they have come right out.

    To push the caliper cylinder back in, I try to leave the inner pad in place and insert a flat blade screwdriver between it and the disc to use as a lever. I find that tends to provide a more even force on the cylinder if you lever onto the middle of the pad.

    It looks like the only additional thing you need to do to get the discs off is the undo the two bolts holding the caliper holder on the hub and remove it so you get free access to disc.

    The only other trick is to make sure you put the pad wear clip on the right way around so the wire loop is closest to the disc. I think my car came from the factory with them around the other way, and there was almost no pad material left by the time they activated.

    I hope that helps.

    Cheers,

    Ken
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  3. #3
    UFO
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    Pretty much exactly what I did and it worked fine.
    Craig K
    2009 C5 HDi Exclusive

  4. #4
    Tadpole FiveSoFar's Avatar
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    Four years on and the video has disappeared, but thanks for the tips Ken.
    It helped me a bit when I renewed rotors and pads on my 2009 C5 today.
    BUT
    the "Hex bolts holding the calipers on" sent me on a wild goose chase to the (Bunnings) shop, for hex keys.
    I had (before looking for FrogHelp) decided that it was probably a TORX fitting bigger than my biggest T40.
    I read Ken's above explanation, which prompted a torch and prostrate(ish) peeping at the culprit. In the dark, with my torch, I was inclined to believe Ken... so I bought a set of Hex Keys... but alas, didn't fit properly... yet somehow I did manage to get one of the two culprits out for a proper look, ...and another trip to the shops for a better tool. (Repco this time).
    When you hold the 'culprit' bolt on the correct angle you can see the little scallop shapes around the edge of the hole, but I reckon that I'd have gotten that sucker out with a 7mm Hex key (7mm doesn't seem to be in any set, and I don't know whether they are available as an individual piece???) if I had one.
    Turns out that my earlier guess was fairly accurate, as T45 torx socket was needed, bigger than what I already possessed.
    Then the 'caliper holder' bolts needed a T55, so I was very happy that I had purchased the "set" of TORX sockets.

    SUMMARY (and going by my shonky memory, as I have already put the torx sockets back onto the rail).
    T35 to undo the rotor.
    T45 to undo the bolts that hide under the plastic caps.
    T55 to undo the two bolts that hold the caliper holder.

    Without the video, it was still a fairly straight forward job.
    Of course, the first one took four or five times longer (with trips to the shop for more tools and no Haynes guide), but with recent experience, the second side was completed in under an hour.
    By them, it was 16:40, so rears will need to wait until next week-end, but hey!!! Hopefully I now have every tool that I'll need...

    I hope that this might help someone along their way, with the tools required. Follow Ken's suggestion about old pads and screwdriver (I used the biggest screwdriver that I could find, and it worked a treat) to get your chubby pads onto your chubby rotor, and you should be home and hosed in no time.

    About the labelled photo. I only labelled the TOP bolts that are visible in the photo. There are (of course) lower bolts for you to find.
    Don't be scared to tackle this job as a handyman. Having said that, I am going to re-read UFO's brilliant description of renewing C5 rear brakes before next week-end.

    Take care froggers and interested onlookers.
    Jezxza
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    Xsaras
    It is definitely an obsession!
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  5. #5
    Tadpole FiveSoFar's Avatar
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    Many years late Allan, but "NO! Front pistons are NOT screw in type" At least, not on my old (2009) girl.
    This info is for anyone like me who stumbles along looking for info about their old cars!
    After my experience today, I imagine that you found it all pretty easy!
    Take care,
    Jez
    Xsaras
    It is definitely an obsession!
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  6. #6
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    It's a completely conventional sliding caliper, pad and disc set up. Torx isn't uncommon on modern cars, as it was designed for manufacturing simplicity with powered tools. To push back the cylinders I always use a G clamp.

    The rear calipers are fixed type.
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