Installing a used fuse box C series.
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Thread: Installing a used fuse box C series.

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    Default Installing a used fuse box C series.

    Gotta fit a used under bonnet so called "intelligent" fuse box into a C5. Same collection of numbers as original, so does this thing require re-initialization. Well I hope not, 'cause I don't have a Lexia.

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    Now go make me a sandwich Hotrodelectric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shanadoo View Post
    Gotta fit a used under bonnet so called "intelligent" fuse box into a C5. Same collection of numbers as original, so does this thing require re-initialization. Well I hope not, 'cause I don't have a Lexia.
    OK, I'll bite: why are you replacing the fusebox? Some loose connections lead to melty badness?

    If there are any modules fitted to your old box- AND they're undamaged- swap them over to your 'new' box. You'll reduce the need for a Lexia because whatever body module does the reading should recognize the original parts. Also, as you're disassembling, very carefully check for connectors that feel loose or look burned- other than the obvious, of course.
    The measure of your character isn't what you do when people are watching- it's what you do when they aren't watching.

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    Plug and play. You need to reset your clock and radio.

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    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Why would the computer know if it's a different fuse box Isn't it just a plastic housing with fuses in it. I see little point in replacing crap with crap myself. I'd find the dead circuit and run a simple external (decent quality) fuse for it. More than likely you replacement fuse box will have the same design fault and issues either way.

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    Contented Peugeot Driver addo's Avatar
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    There's more inside than you credit it with having. Why not open yours up and have a look?

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    1000+ Posts robmac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleChevron View Post
    Why would the computer know if it's a different fuse box Isn't it just a plastic housing with fuses in it. I see little point in replacing crap with crap myself. I'd find the dead circuit and run a simple external (decent quality) fuse for it. More than likely you replacement fuse box will have the same design fault and issues either way.

    seeya,
    Shane L.


    Quite often these "fuse boxes" contain the load switching transistors and multiplex stuff to control them. They are addressed by the body computer.

    From a manufacturers point of view it makes sense to minimise the number of assemblies and spare parts wise to sell a single assembly.

    Personally, I use your approach where possible and replace/bypass a burnt fuse when possible. But sometimes the damage spreads to pcb and SMT components are a nightmare for an old dude , even under a magnifier.

    I notice Jap manufacturers tend to separate the assemblies, indmy van there are power and data feeds to a controller near the local devices.

    All the sliding doors have jesus boxes near them, the central locking has it own controller etc etc. But in van it probably worth the saving in cable runs. I rather like the idea of distributed switching.
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    Contented Peugeot Driver addo's Avatar
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    Allegedly the Alfa 147 uses such a system too. But it's yet to need repair.

    PSF1, as Shanadoo is dealing with, also modifies the oil temperature signal to the dash. Ive had no joy with this when it's been problematic.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hotrodelectric View Post
    OK, I'll bite: why are you replacing the fusebox? Some loose connections lead to melty badness?

    If there are any modules fitted to your old box- AND they're undamaged- swap them over to your 'new' box. You'll reduce the need for a Lexia because whatever body module does the reading should recognize the original parts. Also, as you're disassembling, very carefully check for connectors that feel loose or look burned- other than the obvious, of course.


    Yeh had melty badness a few years ago from heater resistor pack so bad, had to lengthen and re-terminal power wires at the fuse box. Hell of a job getting those Molex connectors. Just re- gunked the mosfet and it's been great ever since, [wires only get warm on full fan is all] Replaced the lot a while ago and since then all the electronic systems have never been better, until recently, got a couple of little issues that defy logic so trying a different fuse box. Evidently these things were "updated/ replaced" under warranty when certain issues arose so they had an unanounced problem somewhere. Mine missed out by a month. Bastards.

    All the stuff underneath these fuse boxes is soldered in to the printed circuit. Did a check on this a while ago looking for low voltage problems. Never found anything wrong so put it back and every thing worked again. The loss is at fuse box itself not the connectors.

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    Dry joint or failing relay perhaps? Rather hard to get at with the encapsulant smeared everywhere.
    There is a connector catalogue in Citroen Service if a specific part if needed, but it would be simpler, not to mention almost free, to harvest a harness from a wreck these days.
    Remember, some of the early C5 HDi have to be locked and unlocked before the engine will fire up after the battery has been disconnected. Something of a heart stopper with $$$$ flashing wildly across the eyes first time around!

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    Now go make me a sandwich Hotrodelectric's Avatar
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    So what's going to be the solution? Try to find one of those "replacement" boxes? That sounds to me the best option if you can find one. I'm guessing they're not segregated according to gas/diesel/4cyl/6cyl/auto/manual.
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    Quote Originally Posted by addo View Post
    There's more inside than you credit it with having. Why not open yours up and have a look?
    Done that and it appears to be a chuck away unit, all soldered together. But there's another box thingy built onto the end, unrepairable I would reckon, like a small computer, couple of chips and lots of stuff in there, got BSI on a sticker and it buzzes and squarks with the key on for a few seconds, and after turning of.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hotrodelectric View Post
    So what's going to be the solution? Try to find one of those "replacement" boxes? That sounds to me the best option if you can find one. I'm guessing they're not segregated according to gas/diesel/4cyl/6cyl/auto/manual.
    They don't appear to be. Got one coming from the UK. If it doesn't fix the problems I've only lost a few dollars, what the hell, it's a Citroen C5.

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    Quote Originally Posted by David S View Post
    Dry joint or failing relay perhaps? Rather hard to get at with the encapsulant smeared everywhere.
    There is a connector catalogue in Citroen Service if a specific part if needed, but it would be simpler, not to mention almost free, to harvest a harness from a wreck these days.
    Remember, some of the early C5 HDi have to be locked and unlocked before the engine will fire up after the battery has been disconnected. Something of a heart stopper with $$$$ flashing wildly across the eyes first time around!
    Tried a fair while ago to buy a harness from the GUYNAIGBTY wreckers in Sydney, never got any joy. eg; giveusyernumberan'i'llgetbacktoyer.

    Never had an issue with disconnecting the battery, but then I always wait until the electronics go into economy mode, which may help.

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    Received a good fuse box from the UK, 10 days and cheap.
    The last item I will ever buy from wreckers in Sydney, took 11 days from date of phone order to get here and cost more than a new unit.
    And yes addo quite correct, it is a plug and play unit. Cheers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by shanadoo View Post
    Received a good fuse box from the UK, 10 days and cheap.
    The last item I will ever buy from wreckers in Sydney, took 11 days from date of phone order to get here and cost more than a new unit.
    And yes addo quite correct, it is a plug and play unit. Cheers.
    Cool. Good luck, here's hoping it works.
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    Funny thing is, for the C5 facelift model I think there was only ever one version specified by factory part number. Yet production versions definitely evolved. Many of the surface mount relays changed brand, too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by addo View Post
    Funny thing is, for the C5 facelift model I think there was only ever one version specified by factory part number. Yet production versions definitely evolved. Many of the surface mount relays changed brand, too.
    Yes so I've discovered. It's why I played it safe and searched for a box with all the correct numbers. Doesn't explain why the dealers claimed a re-initialization would be necessary. Don't they ever get the guilts ripping off their customers?.

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