Hydraulic maintenance/repair/overhaul/test equipment etc.
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Thread: Hydraulic maintenance/repair/overhaul/test equipment etc.

  1. #1
    1000+ Posts gerrypro's Avatar
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    Default Hydraulic maintenance/repair/overhaul/test equipment etc.

    OK here goes!
    Some response from another threads contents has encouraged me to start off this thread!
    I plan to make a test bench to accurately monitor the state of my system in the CX.
    I am inviting those who have been there/done that to contribute their ideas, tips, expertise on ANY AREA of the hydraulic system, so that we can share the knowledge. Our cars are getting older and there are fewer and fewer professionals still in the game to turn to. So how about it who wants to set the ball rolling?

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    Cheers Gerry

  2. #2
    1000+ Posts gerrypro's Avatar
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    29 Views so far! No contributions!
    So here is one to start off:-
    A useful tool for removing O rings in the steering rack can be made easily by flattening one end of a 15cm length of 2mm welding wire. Flatten it out until there is a spatula shaped end then file the edges smooth!
    The difficult O rings are in the aluminium housings of the rack and must be removed before the end seal carriers can be with drawn from each housing!
    And another:
    Here is a good source of liquid filled Pressure gauges to use in making a pressure tester.
    http://cgi.ebay.com.au/ws/eBayISAPI....m=281319482416
    Cheers Gerry

  3. #3
    Fellow Frogger! deesse's Avatar
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    I have never attempted to do any work to my cars hydraulic system myself, though I am keen to get started with some basic maintenance, like how to change the LHM and bleed the system to removing and testing a sphere.

    What I would find useful is a test process for when you feel that maybe your suspension is not working as it should.
    Is there a method to working through the system testing each component so that you are sure it is not faulty.
    Alternatively a list of common hydraulic system and suspension faults and possible causes and cures.

    So I look forward to referring to this thread in the future and gaining the knowledge to maintain my car myself.

    cheers Tony

  4. #4
    Fellow Frogger! rmac's Avatar
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    As one of the more isolated owners of hydraulic/oleopneumatic suspension cars I suppose I should have a test unit so that I can attend to my spheres. I have a 'dead' CX so can source a pump and sphere piston to start with. What I need are the precise plans of what else to do.
    Current Cars
    Australia's 2016 C5 2.0HDi Last
    2011 C5 2.0HDi Comfort
    1973 Citroen D Super 5,
    1981 Citroen CX 2400 Pallas C-matic,
    1981 Citroen CX 2400ie Super Familiale C-matic - Raid Arctique 2014
    1991 Mazda E2200
    1924 Citroen 'la petit citron'

  5. #5
    Contented Peugeot Driver addo's Avatar
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    I wrote up a while back, my adventures getting some jack adaptors made. These were billeted alloy pieces that replaced the ram in a bottle jack. Used with an Ebay aluminium catch can, it makes for a tidy assembly. Half of what I did was for a slightly vindictive laugh - my spend at $170-ish per adaptor was far more than most enthusiasts would consider.

  6. #6
    Fellow Frogger
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    There was a comprehensive test kit for older cars and it's well described in the DS workshop manuals. It has a small piston pimp operated by a lever and an assortment of pressure gauges and fittings. The 7 piston pump and regulator setup is convenient for many people because they have the parts on hand and can simply join them together. The current style of factory sphere tester is a stand that the sphere screws onto with a lever to operate a small piston pump and pressure gauge. The converted jack is close in concept to it. Fitting a plug with a port for hydraulic piping where the sphere would screw in turns the sphere tester into a generic source of test pressure. You probably want to disable the regulator components if using that as a test unit.

  7. #7
    1000+ Posts gerrypro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by addo View Post
    I wrote up a while back, my adventures getting some jack adaptors made. These were billeted alloy pieces that replaced the ram in a bottle jack. Used with an Ebay aluminium catch can, it makes for a tidy assembly. Half of what I did was for a slightly vindictive laugh - my spend at $170-ish per adaptor was far more than most enthusiasts would consider.
    While this approach is commendable it is probably beyond the needs of most of us. I have on hand a CX pump , regulator and an early GS reservoir. I think that this will suffice to test spheres.
    I would also like to measure things like pump output, regulator cut in and cut out points, and pressure drop throughout the system security valve and brake valve functioning etc.etc.
    I imagine that standard metal junction "T" pieces and shorter pieces of standard piping could be used to hook up a pressure gauge to take necessary readings!
    Has anyone done this?
    Cheers Gerry

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    Fellow Frogger! frog's Avatar
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    Here's one Shane made: and the webpage is a blast from the past! For years Iíve intended to build a sphere tester

  9. #9
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by frog View Post
    Here's one Shane made: and the webpage is a blast from the past! For years I’ve intended to build a sphere tester
    Yep, super dodgy or what Just like everything I "attempt" to make.



    But hey it works and costs next to nothing

    I unscrew a pressure line from it to screw into brake calipers to expel the pistons if required (eg: DS clockwork brakes)... So it does serve a couple of purposes.
    'Cit' homepage:
    Citroen Workshop
    Proper cars--
    '85 Series II CX2500 GTi Turbo I
    '63 ID19 http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/citro%EBn-forum/90325-best-project-car-you-have-ever-seen.html
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas (last looked at ... about 15years ago)
    '78 GS1220 pallas
    '92 Range Rover Classic ... 5spd manual.

    Yay ... No Slugomatics


    Modern Junk:
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  10. #10
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    This is my (very, very dodgy) home made sphere regasser ....





    Every time I think I couldn't possibly make anything worse ............... I outdo myself But hey, it works brilliantly

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    'Cit' homepage:
    Citroen Workshop
    Proper cars--
    '85 Series II CX2500 GTi Turbo I
    '63 ID19 http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/showthread.php?t=90325
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas (last looked at ... about 15years ago)
    '78 GS1220 pallas
    '92 Range Rover Classic ... 5spd manual.

    Yay ... No Slugomatics


    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual

  11. #11
    Fellow Frogger!
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    This is my (LHS) sphere tester/test rig. It uses a ID single cylinder pump with a machined adapter to take a sphere extension fitting. The sphere screws on where the yellow plug is fitted. Works fine for sphere testing and is useful for testing of gross leakage in lines and valves. Only problem is that it seems to be limited to around 900 psi. Consequently I'm about to start building a new rig with a motorised 7 piston pump and regulator so that I can fully test the system and components.
    rogerHydraulic maintenance/repair/overhaul/test equipment etc.-hydtestrig_1.jpg

  12. #12
    1000+ Posts gerrypro's Avatar
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    I can testify that this equipment of Shanes works extremely well. Both the gassing and the testing. This is what inspired me to get off my back side and build my own!
    Cheers Gerry

  13. #13
    1000+ Posts Greg C's Avatar
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    I saw a very simple sphere tester in a guys garage. Just get a rear suspension cylinder, mount on a frame with a hydraulic jack under the pushrod, also mounted firmly. Screw a pressure gauge into the high pressure inlet, fill cylinder with LHM. To test screw a sphere on, and operate the jack. When the pressure reading plateaus that's the sphere pressure.
    Mine

    CX Prestige
    Toyota Prius

    In the family

    Xantia SX

  14. #14
    1000+ Posts gerrypro's Avatar
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    Some enterprising people have various ingenious methods of building a Sphere tester, how about testing say:- a regulator or a brake doseur.
    I saw an article a while ago where a fellow dismantled his regulator and re-shimmed it to raise the cut out pressure. He wanted to avoid the steering going firm due to pressure drop!
    To do this would require a tester to measure both cut-in and cut-out!
    Cheers Gerry

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