Xantia; jacking points for hoist?
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  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Default Xantia; jacking points for hoist?

    Due to low usage, my Xantia Activa is getting an interim oil change at a decidedly non-Citroen garage.

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    Does the front crossmember need to be supported (ie: used as the front jacking points) when lifting the car on an industrial hoist? Exactly where should the (4) hoist-pads be sited front & rear to avoid damage?

    I can't find any specific advice or recommendations about this in either my Owners or Haynes manual.

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    With my previous Mercedes W108, the front crossmember including engine and suspension are joined to the unibody rails by two large rubber mounts. If the body is supported only by the sills, the crossmember is effectively left dangling and its combined weight will typically split and destroy these rubber mounts (similar result to the infamous Xantia strut tops) which btw leads to 'undiagnosable' steering wander.

    Years ago I read that if the Holden Camira was hoisted with its crossmember unsupported, there's a risk that the unibody itself may be distorted!

    Thanks for any contribution...

  2. #2
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    I would imagine the jacking points would be fine. The Xantia is a massively strong car. I think all of the torsional strength in it's structure must be required for the activa suspension. You'd be doing well to manage to break anything under it unless you lifted it from somewhere really stupid

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    1000+ Posts jo proffi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nota View Post
    Due to low usage, my Xantia Activa is getting an interim oil change at a decidedly non-Citroen garage.

    Does the front crossmember need to be supported (ie: used as the front jacking points) when lifting the car on an industrial hoist? Exactly where should the (4) hoist-pads be sited front & rear to avoid damage?

    I can't find any specific advice or recommendations about this in either my Owners or Haynes manual.

    ------------------

    With my previous Mercedes W108, the front crossmember including engine and suspension are joined to the unibody rails by two large rubber mounts. If the body is supported only by the sills, the crossmember is effectively left dangling and its combined weight will typically split and destroy these rubber mounts (similar result to the infamous Xantia strut tops) which btw leads to 'undiagnosable' steering wander.

    Years ago I read that if the Holden Camira was hoisted with its crossmember unsupported, there's a risk that the unibody itself may be distorted!

    Thanks for any contribution...
    Simple...... If you dont need to work on the suspension or wheels and are just changing the oil, use a 4 post hoist.
    It is safer for the car and the person below it.

    I'm getting more and more fussy about hoisting my cars, to the point where I make sure I'm there to supervise the placement of the pads.

    If you leave lazy mechs to their own devices you can bet your car is going to lifted poorly by a soft bit of sheet metal (sill/rear beam/ floor pan).

    Jo

  4. #4
    Fellow Frogger
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    Obviously a 2 post hoist. The front jacking points are the place to begin, so you make the hoist arms short at that end to keep most of the weight closer to the hoist pillars. Then adjust the rear arms under the rear jacking points or even just sills if they won't reach. The weight is largely ahead of the front jacking points. You will probably need to raise the suspension to get the hoist arms under the car and then out again at the end.

  5. #5
    JBN
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    I've used a two post hoist. The arms had rubber pads with a groove in them. I put the sill join in the groove and placed the pads to the front of the forward jacking point and to the rear of the rear jacking point. By jacking point, I mean the bit where the car jack goes when you are changing tyres. So the car was raised by the sills, but where the sills join the A pillar and the C pillar.

    I stopped jacking under the subframe when I gotr my first CX. I had been told that that was a particularly weak point (centre of the subframe) and taking all the cars weight using a single trolley jack tended to bend the subframe with bad effects on the steering.

    That said, goodness knows what they do when they jack up your car to replace the tyres. Since most works shops are off limits to the public, one can only hope. I figure my Xantia is fairly strong in that when I first procured it, I had to panel beat the sill join ridge as it had obviously been forklifted at some stage, with the forklift damaging the drivers sills. The car hasn't suffered, but how many fatal diseases so you know that begin with X (as in Xantia)?


    John

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