Building a new 2cv
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  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Default Building a new 2cv

    Hi all,

    the concept as been circling though the head for a few weeks.

    I am interested if anyone has thoughts on the topic.

    If you google Hermes 2cv you see a car that appears to have been custom built. Am I right in saying that this car would literally be new?

    In a recent rant and rave on my red car, being a jalopy when I got it, I mentioned most parts came from France and Peter Fosselius. Some from David in Tenterfield.

    There are parts available for the 2cv it seems, to construct a car from scratch. A brand new car.

    Does anyone know of others apart from the Hermes car? In theory it is possible, but what would the practicalities be? Could you build a car in France and ship over?

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    Chris Mortimer

  2. #2
    JBN
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    Chris, I built Daffy Duck from and old engine/gearbox with a siezed engine. No chassis (started with a new one). The rear axle was very old (nice welding on the arms). The front axle was more recent (crappy welding on the arms). I had a collection or doors, a bootlid and a bonnet. I also had a hull, with refurbished floors and sills. These are the following items I purchased new from either 2CViking (when he was in Perth) or ECAS.
    1. New chassis
    2. New metal brake lines
    3. New master cylinder
    4. new disc rotors, brake pads, calipers refurbished
    5. Axles sandblasted and ALL bearings renewed (both suspension ans wheel bearings)
    6. New rear drums,slave cylinders, eccentrics, shoes
    7. Refurbished steering rack with new pinion and new ball thingos that the track rod attaches to
    8. New track adjusters
    9. New steering arms and track rod ends
    10. New kingpins
    11. New tyres
    12. New shock absorbers and bump stops
    13. Replaced piston barrels/pistons/rings
    14. Refurbished cylinder heads (needed one new valve)
    15. New clutch and clutch lever and clutch cable
    16. New hood and rear window (from Holland)
    17. new windscreen
    18. Refurbished seats - new cloth seat/back, new rubber bands, new foam, new seat covers


    In the end, I ended up with virtually a new car. One could replace all the body components with new pressings as well. With your car, maybe replace the winscreen surround which includes the hinge for the bonnet. Other areas to note would be rear lower seat belt mounts, rear bump stop mounts, front floor, bottom of rear quarter windows and rear light panel are prone to rust.

    I have another friend, David, who is nearing a complete refurbishment of his 2CV, replacing all components similar to what I did. His will be a very nice street 2CV. Mine was built for Raid and some parts (paint) are a bit rough because it has a hard life, but all the mechanicals and structure were renewed for reliability in remote areas.

    Time and money coupled with persistance are the only criteria required. Whatever money you spend, you will be able to recoup in the future should you decide to sell. A good 2CV is an appreciating object. They will never build anything like them, as they never did build anything like them in the past.

    John

  3. #3
    Fellow Frogger!
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    have fun then trying to register a 2013 2CV with the authorities and insurance companies !!!

    Glenn

  4. #4
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Default 2cv

    Thanks John. You are right and it would be worth just focusing on a car that has potential and go all out and get it like new. But you cannot help but wonder with all the new and reproduction parts on the market, the prospect of building one from scratch cannot be overlooked. It would surely be possible to create a new car.

    But as you say Glenn, try registering one and then insuring. I am a bit ignorant with all of this, but specifically what would be the problem? The car would be roadworthy but getting it complied and registered are not my area of expertise. Could such a car ever be registered and driven normally? That Hermes car looks like a display piece.

    Chris





    Quote Originally Posted by gembee View Post
    have fun then trying to register a 2013 2CV with the authorities and insurance companies !!!

    Glenn

  5. #5
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    Im thinking that if you have some id from an existing car you could say it was that car rebuilt ,pugs i recall my son going through some rigmarole when replacing a chassis on a toyota ute as the original car had been hit up the back bending the chassis ,the replacement one was from a stat right off ,a new number was issued and had to be stamped on and the stamping inspected at the local police station ,at no point was the structural in integrity checked ,they just wanted to make sure it wasnt stolen this was in q.l.d at that time it was not possible in n.s.w ask the relevent questions at your local registry pugs

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    JBN
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    Chris, if you are thinking of doing your red 2CV, for example, this is what I would do:

    1. Remove body from chassis. This separates the body from the mechanicals. You need 4 X 44 gallon drums and two 4" X 2" wood lengths, 2.4 metres long. Slide the wood length between the body and chassis. Four stout blokes can lift the body by the wood beams and park the ends of the beams onto the 44 gallon drums. You can now wheel the mechanicals form under the body.
    2. Remove, each component, clean, repaint and reburbish as neccessary. If the chassis is in good shape, just clean and paint, otherwise replace with a new one. The springpots generally only need repainting with perhaps new rubber buffers and gaiters. If you replace the chassis, punch the old chassis number on the drivers side front arm.
    3. Refurbish the engine. Punch the engine serial number on the drivers side of the crankcase, near the base of the cylinder barrel. In NSW they didn't like the engine number plate supplied by SA Citroen, but they accept the same number punched on the crankcase (humour them).
    4. With the body free of the chassis, strip and refurbish as appropriate. I have mentioned the main areas that may need replacing with new metal bits (readily available from Europe).
    5. Reassemble. Presuming that the car was registered prior to this exercise and presuming that the refurbish is completed before the next registration check is due, just renew the rego as you normally do. It is the same car, but better. Within limits, its what everyone has done to greater or less extent to any 2CVs (or other classics) that they intend to keep in top condition.


    Building a car from new might produce exactly the same result but you will never get it registered. Let the cars registration lapse for 3 or more years and you have to get an engineers inspection and may be up for a lot of crazy additions, depending of how your individual engineer views the ADRs.

    Do not get too carried away with new is better. The best front mudguards are the French built ones. The best suspension arms are the older ones. For me, the best front suspension arms are the ones with batteurs (inertial dampers), often from Amis. Many prefer the original Citroen chassis (< 1986) to the pattern parts available today. In the end, "best" means sound, rust free, cleaned and painted. When you get the body painted, use a good two pack paint. My Dolly-Charlston was painted in 1995 with Glasurit. It still looks better than any new 2CV on the day they left the Citroen factory (paint wise).

    John

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