GS Fuel Consumption
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  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger! sparkey's Avatar
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    Default GS Fuel Consumption

    Was looking at a site that indicated the GS 1220 was a surprisingly thirsty beast.

    Twin-choke Solex or Weber carburetters difficult to adjust and difficult to improve upon the low to mid-twenties miles per gallon (approx 12lt/100km).

    Is this the case GS owners (past owners)?


    http://www.uniquecarsandparts.com.au...en_gs_1220.htm

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  2. #2
    Simon's Avatar
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    From the useless info file, here are a few Citroen sourced fuel consumption figures for reference:

    1977 GS
    1015cc 6.9l/100km @ 90km/h, 9.7l/100km @ 120km/h
    1220cc 6.8l/100km @ 90km/h, 9.6l/100km @ 120km/h

    1979 GS
    1129cc (8x33) 6.4l/100km @ 90km/h, 8.4l/100km @ 120km/h, Urban cycle 8.7 l/100km
    1220cc 6.8l/100km @ 90km/h, 9.6l/100km @ 120km/h, Urban cycle 11.2 l/100km
    1220cc (C-Matic) 7.4l/100km @ 90km/h, 10.3l/100km @ 120km/h, Urban cycle 10.5 l/100km
    1300cc (4 speed) 6.8l/100km @ 90km/h, 9.7l/100km @ 120km/h, Urban cycle 9.6 l/100km
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  3. #3
    Ashtray Polisher donat's Avatar
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    That seems about right in terms of figures. If you want good fuel economy in a GS, just don't put the pedal down enough to open the 2nd throat. No easy task for me!

    They certainly do vary. Looking at my fuel consumption log, my old 2/72 GS at best got 9.4L/100KM. Mind you, it's a 1015. My current 1015 at best gets 10.9L/100KM and that's mixed city and highway driving week in, week out.

    My ID constantly gets around 9.5L/100KM. And while I'm at it, the SM's most recent figures were 13.9L/100KM from its triple Webers.
    1972 SM
    1989 BX 16 Valve

  4. #4
    1000+ Posts Bruce H's Avatar
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    Doing the regular 900k trip to central Qld decades ago my 1220 wagon used to average 10 litres per 100k, but I did get one of my two ever speeding tickets on one trip, and the tacho rarely dropped below vertical needle. Before I retired it from the daily commute, with a carby requiring overhaul, on 10ks of stop / stop / stop / start / stop city cycle it wasn't unknown for me to get 11 or 12 litres per 100ks.
    My best ever consumption, in the old language, was a car club economy run where I got 40mpg, without freewheeling or other tricks.
    Last edited by Bruce H; 8th February 2013 at 11:20 PM. Reason: Typo
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  5. #5
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    Would be interested to know if this mod mIght improve them economy wise:
    http://www.eddinsmoto.com/id131.htm

  6. #6
    Fellow Frogger! DaveB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by graham66 View Post
    Would be interested to know if this mod mIght improve them economy wise:
    http://www.eddinsmoto.com/id131.htm
    What great work, well explained.
    Cool with a capital K

  7. #7
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    Looking back at VB our 1974 GS wagon with the semi auto gearbox can see over 1500km including driving it home from Sydney to Melb it's averaged 29.86mpg. A high 34.10mpg on one of the highway legs home, a low 24.93mpg in metro running around Melb. Was going to say short running but unless you live on the top of a hill a GS is not the sort of car like a modern car where you'd hop in and drive 400m to the shops to get a pint milk. Mileage figures on Optimax 98 with valvemaster.

    I've had a few small cars, Honda City, Mazda 121 Bubble, current VW Polo 77TSI with DSG. The Polo has averaged 37.41mpg over 12,000km. The Polo engine, gearbox, power steering and air con in a GS would be a marriage made in heaven and would suit the character of the GS very well. Sacrilege or sacre dieu?
    Last edited by J'aime la vie; 11th February 2013 at 10:39 PM.

  8. #8
    Ashtray Polisher donat's Avatar
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    Not to start a fuel argument, but in a GS there's no need for valvemaster or anything similar. 98 octane straight from the spout is all you need.

    I remember in my experiences, a Convertisseur gearbox would spend 15-20% more fuel than that of a 4 speed manual.
    1972 SM
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  9. #9
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    Hi Donat... interesting. So what is it about Optimax or Vortex 98 that allows you to ditch the lead additives like Valvemaster?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by donat View Post
    Convertisseur gearbox would spend 15-20% more fuel than that of a 4 speed manual.
    Around town I recall it being a little thirstier, but highway cycle was negligible.

  11. #11
    Ashtray Polisher donat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J'aime la vie View Post
    Hi Donat... interesting. So what is it about Optimax or Vortex 98 that allows you to ditch the lead additives like Valvemaster?
    1220 motors have hardened seat valves which can manage 98 without any problems.

    http://www.citroenet.org.uk/miscella...leaded.html#GS
    1972 SM
    1989 BX 16 Valve

  12. #12
    1000+ Posts gerrypro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by donat View Post
    1220 motors have hardened seat valves which can manage 98 without any problems.

    http://www.citroenet.org.uk/miscella...leaded.html#GS
    I notice in this table for GS 1220 engines that the dates only go back as far as 1978-----------Mine is a 1972 model and still runs quite happily on 92 RON. As with my CX slightly delaying the advance curve by adding a little more tension to the flyweight springs eliminated the tendency of the engines to pink under load.
    Cheers Gerry

  13. #13
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    Nothing, you still need additives as these fuels are unleaded like the others.
    It does mean though that the octane level is sufficient for earlier engines.
    Graham

    Quote Originally Posted by J'aime la vie View Post
    Hi Donat... interesting. So what is it about Optimax or Vortex 98 that allows you to ditch the lead additives like Valvemaster?

  14. #14
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    My old cars don't get driven much. I feed them 98 simply because the cost of fuel isn't relevant in a car that's driven 40days a year. I used to drive my GS years ago thinking it would use less fuel than a thirsty CX ..... I lived about 5km from work, and pushed the choke fully in as I reached there each day with it running like a pig the whole way. It used much the same fuel as the CX around town but it was a shit of a thing to drive due to the way it ran when it was cold.

    Great little car though. I'd have another in a heartbeat if I found a good one..... straight onto a club permit too. See how much the victorian club permit scheme has helped nutters that like tinkering with old cars

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  15. #15
    1000+ Posts gerrypro's Avatar
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    Yes they take ages to warm up. Especially if the preheat pipes to the carby base have been blanked off--( a common 'fix' to the corrosion of the hot spot housing ).
    There is a good case for using the grille muff that was an optional extra when the car is used primarily for short commutes. It speeds the warm up considerably.
    Cheers Gerry

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