2CV brakes
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Thread: 2CV brakes

  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Default 2CV brakes

    I have finished reconditioning the brakes on a 1979 model with drums,new wheel cylinders,new master cylinder (brake fluid type),new pipework,clean reservior.
    Could i use LHM instead of brake fluid?, is it compatible the new rubbers?.

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  2. #2
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Absolutely NOT .... Unless you replaced everything with LHM versions. In that case, absolutely YES. Get it wrong and you'll trash all the seals. Check your invoices and see what version of everything you purchased

    Is a '79 brake fluid. My mothers '84 is LHM. I wonder why they decided to change to LHM ... seems strange given the issues involved with incorrect fluid usage.

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    1000+ Posts gerrypro's Avatar
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    If you renew all the rubbers and seals you can use dot 5 silicon fluid. This will not attack paint work and will not absorb moisture so it is pretty much a forever solution to brake deterioration for infrequently used cars. I use it in my Traction ---- a 1953 Light 15.
    Cheers Gerry

  4. #4
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    Thanks Gerry,i use Castrol SRF (synthetic racing fluid) in the open wheel race cars,dear as poison but never had a problem with it.

  5. #5
    JBN
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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleChevron View Post
    Absolutely NOT .... Unless you replaced everything with LHM versions. In that case, absolutely YES. Get it wrong and you'll trash all the seals. Check your invoices and see what version of everything you purchased

    Is a '79 brake fluid. My mothers '84 is LHM. I wonder why they decided to change to LHM ... seems strange given the issues involved with incorrect fluid usage.

    seeya
    Shane L.
    They changed to LHM when they replaced the front drums with discs. Why did they change to LHM? I guess because ALL their disc brake cars prior to 1980 had used LHM. They probably had no concept of brake fluid used with disc brakes.

    I am glad they did make the change, as my two 2CVs have always lived with BXs and Xantias, so life has been a bit more simple.

    Had I being refurbishing the brakes on a pre 1980 2CV, I could have started with front disc brakes, replaced the brakes lines, master cylinder, rear slave cylinders. The front drums are a pain to adjust, whereas the discs are simple and give excellent braking.

    John

  6. #6
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    How do I tell the condition of my rear drums brakes on an 87 Bamboo, seems they have to come apart , oh dear

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    The rear drum breaks are nothing mysterious. Though theyre often neglected.
    Check the usual things, is there brake fluid leaking from the wheel cylinder? can you adjust the brakes to stop effectively? Do you the brakes squeal on application?
    The usual sort of stuff.
    As always the best way is to remove the drums and have a look. The adjusters are prone to corrosion if theyre not looked at occasionally.
    To access the breaks there is a (usualy) plastic grease cap. Underneath that is a 44mm nut. Once its removed back off the brakes the the drums can be taken off. This is much easier if you have a drum remover tool. Something like this will help http://www.franzose.de/en/Citroen-2C...-KFZ/ANR20135/

  8. #8
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    Thanks Ian will look at the 44 and see if Im brave enough to twist it off

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    The Haynes manual is a generally a good guide to the rear brakes. The 44mm nut is fairly tight, a long lever is very useful.

  10. #10
    1000+ Posts daffyduck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Renburg View Post
    Thanks Ian will look at the 44 and see if Im brave enough to twist it off
    Do yourself a favor and be sure to unpeen the nut first!

  11. #11
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    Sorry I will advice against opening the peened over nut. Any incorrect tool may ruin the thread on the stub.
    The folded edge on the nut is very soft and will open itself when turned. Use a solid 44 mm socket on a solid breaker bar. Remember to support both swing arms with stands so you don't bend the swing arm stops (small pigs tailes resting on the chassis stops)

    2CV brakes-p2070051.jpg

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