2CV Heater Tubes
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  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger! Inspector Clouseau's Avatar
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    Default 2CV Heater Tubes

    Looking for some advice on replacement heater tubes for the 2CV. I'm not that keen on the original parts and am hoping for a recommendation on alternative tubes. My tubes fell apart yonks ago and I don't even have the sizes; nor lengths . I understand RH drives have different requirements to LHD. Is that correct?
    Any advice gratefully received.
    Thanks

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  2. #2
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    RHD have 1 extra tube feeding the windscreen on the right side. The rest is the same. New tubes not cut to short will last a long time. Biggest problem is not securing them right, one can drop (RHS) on the exhaust burning the car.

  3. #3
    JBN
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    The easiest way to replace them is with new ones.

    The trick I use is to drill a small hole on top of the metal tube that each end of the heater tube plugs in to. Get some wire (I use the flat bit at the bottom of a coat hanger), make a 1/2" right angled bend on one end and insert it into the hole in the metal tube. Then bend it towards the opposite hole, cutting it 1/2" beyond the hole and also bending the last 1/2" at right angles.

    Slip the heater tube over the wire, locate the wire into the appropriate holes and pull the heater tube ends over the metal tubes. This stops the heater tubes from falling off and onto the hot exhaust, but allows then to be removed when necessary.

    Having just spent a frustrating afternoon removing the fuel tank and replacing the sender unit, I am too sore and tired to take any photos. If anyone would want a photo to clarify the above, reply to this thread and I will do so tomorrow.

    John

  4. #4
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    The standard heater tubes work well and fits well. When you first fit them they may seem a little tight, but over time they will still fit well. The foam lining insulates from heat loss and abosorbs engine noise. I use a similar support for the heater tube utilising a cable tie.
    Be aware that if the heater tube does catch fire the insulating foam produces a very heavy acrid smoke. Dont ask me how i know this.

    Ian S

  5. #5
    Fellow Frogger! Inspector Clouseau's Avatar
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    Thanks for the advice. Looks like the standard replacement tubes are the go, then. And secured to avoid fire - it seems that 2CVs have more in common with VW beetles than shape and boxer engines.

  6. #6
    JBN
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    Quote Originally Posted by Inspector Clouseau View Post
    Thanks for the advice. Looks like the standard replacement tubes are the go, then. And secured to avoid fire - it seems that 2CVs have more in common with VW beetles than shape and boxer engines.
    I have had a fire in a 2CV with a heater tube (the special RHD one) and a fire in a VW Beetle when a rock hit underneath the rear seat at the precise point where the 6 volt battery was, forcing the battery up and then having the metal battery top short out the battery.

    In all other comparisons, the 2CV is the superior design, the VW is the superior build quality.

    John

  7. #7
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    Ref. Heater Tubes. I've got a one mtr. length of heater (78mm) insulation from my local plummer.
    Apx. one hour' work. A(sharp) knife cutting, and a bit of gaffa, provided me with a set new heater hoses. Very much reduced engine-noise, and a considerable improvement of cab-heating...
    On top of it. The stuff is fire-resistant...

    Best SÝren MN2CV Heater Tubes-heater-tube.jpg

  8. #8
    JBN
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    I think you should degrease the engine compartment. That shiny silver looks out of place amongst the grunge.

    John

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soeren Nielsen View Post
    Ref. Heater Tubes. I've got a one mtr. length of heater (78mm) insulation from my local plummer.
    Apx. one hour' work. A(sharp) knife cutting, and a bit of gaffa, provided me with a set new heater hoses. Very much reduced engine-noise, and a considerable improvement of cab-heating...
    On top of it. The stuff is fire-resistant...

    Best SÝren MNClick image for larger version. 

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    I will have a look , fireprof eh , that is good and what is it,, some type of foam ?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Renburg View Post
    I will have a look , fireprof eh , that is good and what is it,, some type of foam ?

    How fireproof is the bright yellow cable tie used to secure the fireproof foam duct ???
    There is something amiss in the state of Denmark

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    You might be struggling to make any car 'fire proof'. Do bear in mind with the 2CV the big issue is the possibility of a heater hose working loose and falling onto the exhaust manifold, hence the tie and other suggesions to help prevent this. I can recall visiting a wreckers in the UK and finding no fewer than 3 2CVs, all with burnt out engine bays.

    Also, if you are somewhere 'hot' , don't forget the possibility of leaving them off altogether. In the summer I used to stuff a pair of socks in the bulkhead hole then tape a plastic cap over the end to stop the nice warm breeze that pushes past the heater off flap!

  12. #12
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    Great adaptation Soren, I will be looking into that!

    @ fritzelhund: ? its to prevent the tube from dislodging and resting itself on the exhaust which then causes standard heater pipes to catch on fire... it's fire resistance is of no concern, did you think that parts of 2cv's just spontaneously combust!

    There is something amiss in the state of Brisbane.

    Harley ;-)

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pastinha View Post
    Great adaptation Soren, I will be looking into that!

    @ fritzelhund: ? its to prevent the tube from dislodging and resting itself on the exhaust which then causes standard heater pipes to catch on fire... it's fire resistance is of no concern, did you think that parts of 2cv's just spontaneously combust!

    There is something amiss in the state of Brisbane.

    Harley ;-)

    Yes !! Just my point.

    My concern was the plastic !!! When so many alternatives are available in the form of worm drive hose clips that can be ganged together to make a big enough circle .... or the neater option ... cable ties are also available in stainless steel .. saw some in Bunnings only yesterday. IMHO even a wire twitched around the tube would be a more heat proof solution.
    Cable ties are fantastically versatile, even used as handcuffs, but in the right place..and I consider on a heat transferring tube a less than ideal position. The original cardboard/foil duct stuff was appalling, and was used in Ds as well where the foam lining would disintegrate and be shot into the driver's eyes from the dashtop ducts, especially after a large bluff fronted truck was encountered going in the other direction.

  14. #14
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    Yes mine is secured with 1mm wire and the right one removed in summer and the hole tapped up

    Im using good old 20W 50 valvo in summer
    Last edited by Renburg; 26th November 2012 at 08:48 PM.

  15. #15
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    I can never get the heat exchangers to seal and stop the hot air from comming through.

    During summer i usually leave the tubes in place and block-off the bulkhead end with aluminium foil.

    On occasions when ive been caught out by some hot weather ive stuffed a pair of socks in the bulkhead tube too.

    Ian

  16. #16
    JBN
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    I usually use gaffa tape to block the bulkhead end. Took some photos of my heater tube support system. Not only does it stop the tubes from dislodging, gettting lost, etc, but it also gives them enough support to lay cables and wiring over the top (in this case held in place by at cable tie. The first photo shows the coathanger wire bent and cut to size. The next the bent ends and the small drilled hole and the last the way it looks after the wire is inserted through the tube.


    John2CV Heater Tubes-heater-tube-1.jpg2CV Heater Tubes-heater-tube-2.jpg2CV Heater Tubes-heater-tube-3.jpg

  17. #17
    Fellow Frogger! Inspector Clouseau's Avatar
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    John, that is such a brilliantly simple, failsafe solution. Thanks for the tip.

  18. #18
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    Talking about it. Woman arrives complaining about funny smell. Lucky lady eh, tube was smoking

    2CV Heater Tubes-p6032171.jpg

  19. #19
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    I realize this is an old thread but I'm new to this forum so please bear with me!

    I've been wondering if any of you guys have come up with any solutions to improving the air velocity on the heater of 2CV?

    I was way more comfortably back in the summer with sweat dripping off my forehead with the top rolled back, fresh air vent open at 35C than I was one morning in the fall with the top up, windows closed, heater going full blast at 2C even while running my improvised grill muff made from cardboard to boost the engine temperature. NOTE, I actually ordered a grill muff but for some reason either accidentally ordered the incorrect year or got sent the wrong one by mistake.



    Back in the summer, I was de-greasing my engine compartment with my 1500 PSI pressure washer and did not think to remove the cardboard dump tubes so my pressure washer disintegrated them! But I like these rubber replacements I got from Burton's better.



    For some reason the flapper arm wanted to rub the one on the right hand side. Maybe when I installed the new crossbox, I got the heat exchanger a bit out of adjustment. But at least I got the crossbox lined up with the hanger bolts on the gearbox after about three hours! I fiddled with the flapper arm for about three hours and finally decided to bend the arm up a bit so it wouldn't rub the boot and removed the clip thing that is supposed prevent the cable from popping off.

    I think the heater valves were adjusted properly and in sync when I got this car but to make sure I opened and closed the heater vent several times while sticking my hand in the vent in both positions before I was satisfied that on heat mode all the heat was being dumped into the cabin and in the summertime, all the heat was being dumped into the wheel wells.

    I discovered that the one on the passenger side seems a bit short and may have been leaking air. I stretched it a bit. Also the foam liner seemed to have a few leaks around it. So I used some of that foam rubber used to seal around doors to make up the difference. I like the coat hanger idea and will use this idea to prevent an engine fire. Why did Citroen crimp the tubes going into the cabin? They are about 2" in diameter but where the metal comes together makes them impossible to use those worm clamps.

    One plan I was thinking about doing was use some of that 3" aluminum dryer ducting with some foam around the edges. But someone on another forum told me they tried that and it was like two trumpets blowing into the cabin!

    The heater on my Trabant is not as good as the heater on my water cooled vehicles but better than the heater on my 2CV. You just have to keep moving! Otherwise at idle, I can feel the cabin temperature drop.

    Here was an ill fated attempt I made at installing a 4" blower fan:

    Trabant Heater by James Seabolt | Photobucket

    The fan actually worked better but the noise was deafening! There is an elbow that comes off the heat exchanger with a baffle inside it. Without this baffle in place, it sounded like all the engine noise was being dumped into the cabin!

    I did measure the heat coming into the car. At 4C outside, the air coming into the cabin was 60C. Now if I could just get more air flow, I think this will do the trick.

    Yes I borrowed the passenger side heat tube off my 2CV in one attempt to see if this muffled the engine noise. It did but the ID of the 2CV tube is 2" and this restricted the air flow so I gave up on this idea.

    In the final photo, I used some 3" Mylar dryer ducting material to connect the baffle to the diverter at the bulkhead. For some reason with the elbow seated firmly on the heat exchanger, the short hose would not line up so maybe I had a leak. I've had the exhaust system off this car and maybe I did not get it installed properly. It uses the same type of exhaust clamp to secure the heat exchanger to the exhaust manifold!

    Anyway someone told them they tried to mount a plastic inline fan on their Trabant and the fan melted.

    I've got one more trick up my sleeve with the Trabant but since this is a Citroen forum, I'll stick with the 2CV.

    One thing that I noticed was the boxes that surround the cylinders and exhaust pipes (the heat exchanger) don't seem like they are sealed up all that well and can be wiggled a bit. Would sealing up around these boxes where the exhaust pipes exit make any difference?

    I thought about wrapping some header wrap around the ends of the boxes and metal wire to hold it in place just to see if this would work.
    Last edited by turbofiat124; 10th January 2017 at 07:00 PM.
    1987 2CV faux Charleston edition (One of many other makes)

    Mount Carmel, TN. (Outside Kingsport) USA

    http://s222.photobucket.com/user/turbofiat/library/Citroen%202CV?sort=2&page=1

  20. #20
    JBN
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    I think you should attend church more often and pray to God to raise the temperature in Tennessee in general.

    Whilst we in Australia are basking in 40 Celsius temperatures, you guys are freezing in Artic conditions.

    John

  21. #21
    Member turbofiat124's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBN View Post
    I think you should attend church more often and pray to God to raise the temperature in Tennessee in general.

    Whilst we in Australia are basking in 40 Celsius temperatures, you guys are freezing in Artic conditions.

    John
    But come May, the tables should turn!

    I assume the humidity varies throughout OZ like it does in the US.

    On the east coast, the humidity can be anywhere from 30 to 100% at 35C. On the west coast like in the desert or Rocky Mountains it can be dry (8%) but 45C in the desert and it doesn't feel that much difference. As they say, "It's a dry" heat.

    The main bossman who is from Germany had never lived here like my French boss had and he could not get over that it can be 24C in the day and fall to 4C at night during the fall.
    1987 2CV faux Charleston edition (One of many other makes)

    Mount Carmel, TN. (Outside Kingsport) USA

    http://s222.photobucket.com/user/turbofiat/library/Citroen%202CV?sort=2&page=1

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